Search Results for:

SPACETALK

It had taken him almost three years to record, but in 1985 Jake Hottell finally finished his debut solo album, Break The Chains. Inspired by his opposition to fracking, anger at government corruption and a series of profound spiritual experiences, a hundred copies of the album were pressed and given away to radio stations, friends and local business interests in Hottell's home state of New Mexico.

The album would have remained an obscure footnote in musical history had it not been for the efforts of Jeremy Spellacey and Danny McLewin. Between them, they tracked down Hottell to hear his story, offering the former electronics engineer and Nashville-based music producer the chance to get his music to a whole new audience. Now, some 34 years after the private press edition was produced, Spacetalk is reissuing Break The Chains for the very first time.

Hottell began recording the album in 1982 after reading Your Body's Many Cries For Water, a best-selling book by Dr Fereydoon Batmanghelidj about the health benefits of clean, purified water. Remembering the poisonous, methane-laden water that came out of his mother's taps in the 1970s – a by-product of extensive fracking activity in the area around the family farm – Hottell wanted to create a set of tracks that registered his concerns, reflected his recent spiritual experiences (many of which he still finds it difficult to discuss today) and offered a meditative listening experience.

The resultant set is suitably cosmic and emotive, with Hottell cannily fusing gentle drum machine rhythms and dreamy synthesizer motifs – influenced, he says, by a love of the contemporaneous new age output of former jazz label Windham Hill Records – with his own glistening guitar passages, which sit somewhere between the homespun riffs of country music and the classical guitar solos that have long been a sonic staple of Spanish styles such as Flamenco.

Many of the tracks have stories attached. "Horizon" features a profound spoken word vocal from local man Darald McCabe – whose homemade purified water helped Hottell recover from serious illness – while "El Rio dos les Delores" was composed after discovering that fracking was taking place on a local Native American reservation. "The Truth Is All I Want", meanwhile, reflects Hottell's growing exasperation at the extent of corporate greed and government corruption in the United States. There's also the unreleased track 'Sapphire' which came to light whilst discussing the album reissue with Jake.

This new edition of Break The Chains has been painstakingly re-mastered while extensive new liner notes shed light on the remarkable musical and personal experiences that inspired Hottell to create an obscure, overlooked classic. 

For the third volume of compilations curated by confirmed crate diggers, Spacetalk invites you to take a trip to the magical Mediterranean resort of Club Meduse in the company of Beachfreaks Records co-founder Charles Bals.

A creative director, designer and curator by trade, Bals spends the majority of his spare time searching for superb, unknown, small-run music releases made between the 1970s and 1990s. While some of these are made available for other enthusiasts to buy via Beachfreaks' mail-order service, many more make it into the racks of Bals' private collection. With Club Meduse, Bals is sharing rare, hard-to-find and just plain brilliant gems from his personal stash for the very first time.

For Club Meduse, Bals was inspired by countless magic childhood summers spent playing amongst the rocks, beaches and warm seas of the Cote D'Azur. The compilation, then, is a soundtrack to the greatest soft-focus, sunlit teenage summer holiday you've never had, with a gaggle of forgotten musicians and overlooked artists for company.

Take a barefoot stroll from the campsite to the beach with Ara Macao, whose warm and lucid "Canyon" is a softly-spun delight, before splashing in the crystal clear waters to the accompaniment of The Clean-Hands Group and their 1984 Balearic blue-eyed soul gems "Night Fly" and "Shake It On".

As the sun comes down, clamber across the cooling rocks with the tumbling, sun-kissed guitar solos and sparkling analogue synthesizer motifs of The Keyboys' leisurely "Savannah" ringing in your ears, before using the words of Gemini's "Take A Chance" – undoubtedly the most Balearic record to emerge from Sweden in the last 50 years – to get flirtatious under the moonlight.

Should you fancy a dance down the camp disco, Bals' selections will gently ease you onto the dancefloor and into the gaze of the boy or girl of your dreams. The fuzzy Italo-boogie of the C.V.Q Band's "Whatever You Do (Instrumental)" will get you going, while Miss's 1984 French electro gem "Hip Hop" should guarantee a celebratory conclusion to the night's party. 

With only a handful of sought-after private press 7” singles to their name, Morrison Kincannon are all but unknown outside record collecting circles. Yet Norman Morrison and Terry Kincannon wrote and recorded some superb songs during the 1970s and early ‘80s, desperately hoping for the break that would see them released on vinyl. Now, at last, their time has finally come. Morrison and Kincannon first started working together as teenagers almost 50 years ago. Every Saturday, they would get together to jam and write songs. This led to recording sessions at a friendly studio in San Francisco and a management and publishing deal with Manny Greenhill, a man who had previously nurtured the careers of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Sadly, their hoped-for-success never came, and by the early 1980s both members had re-focused on work and family. As the years rolled by, their original multi-track recordings lay idle in Morrison’s loft, seemingly never to be released.

All that changed when Morrison received an email from Spacetalk Records two years ago, asking about the possibility of reissuing “To See One Eagle Fly”, the B-side to one of their 7” singles that has long been a favourite of label co-founder Danny McLewin. Once a deal had been done, Morrison mentioned that he had hours of unissued recordings in his loft; a treasure trove of ultra-rare multi-track master tapes that could be freshly mixed and mastered for release. When the Spacetalk Records’ team finally got a chance to listen, they were astonished by the timeless quality of the songs. Put simply, they just had to be released.

The resultant album is a stunning set: an intoxicating glimpse into the world of two previously unheralded master songwriters whose musical vision encapsulates all that was good about Californian music during the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Rooted in the American folk revival and folk-rock movement of the late ‘60s, the album’s 15 thoughtful, heartfelt songs are laden with sly nods to the likes of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Ned Doheny, Michael Deacon, Cy Timmons, Gene Clark and Buffalo Springfield. The tracks were recorded at various times between 1970 and ’82 and gives a small glimpse of the duo’s total body of unissued work. The release comes with extensive liner notes telling the remarkable story of two lifelong friends and musical collaborators who thought their moment had passed. 

STAFF COMMENTS

Andy says: Incredibly rich soul, folk, West Coast groove-rock that inexplicably fell between the cracks. The songs are impeccable, the vibe pure, hippy, LA mellowness.How was this never released!?

When Psychemagik’s Danny McLewin decided to launch Spacetalk Records, he didn’t just want to reissue rare material. From the start, one of his stated aims was to deliver fresh new versions of obscure cuts from his record collection. It’s perhaps fitting, then, that the label’s second 12” breathes new life into a suitably little-known gem: Avant Garde’s 1982 Euro-boogie B-side, “Everybody’s  Lover”. The track was originally featured on the flip of the seven-piece Dutch outfit’s second and final 7”, “Walking Back To Happiness”. It has been a feature of McLewin’s DJ sets for years, inspiring countless track ID requests from excited clubbers. Earlier this year, Danny set out to track down the songwriter-turned-producer behind the record, Avant Garde mastermind Hans Van Hemert. Happily, the search was a fruitful one; not only did Van Hemert own the rights to the song, but he’d also kept hold of the tapes from the original recording sessions. With the Dutchman’s agreement, McLewin asked old friends Jaz and Party Dad, and label co-owner Paul ‘Mudd’ Murphy, to put their own spin on the supersmooth ’82 original. Predictably, they’ve done a bang-up job. On the A-side you’ll find Jaz & Party Dad’s version, which is little less than the extended 12” version that “Everybody’s Lover” always deserved. Smooth, soulful and tactile, the duo’s rework makes full use of the Dutch band’s wonderful vocals, loved-up chords, sparkling synth flourishes and killer bassline, adding a touch of delay to the beats for added ‘80s boogie effect. Murphy takes a different approach on the flip, drawing influence from the pioneering 1980s “proto-house” dubs of acclaimed New York producers Paul Simpson, Winston Jones, Boyd Jarvis and Timmy Regisford. Delay-laden guitar flashes and synthesizer flourishes echo in and out of the mix, whilst saucer-eyed pads rub shoulders with reverb-heavy beats and Avant Garde’s rolling bassline. It’s one of Murphy’s most confident remixes of recent times, and makes a fitting partner to Jaz & Party Dad’s vocal-heavy A-side interpretation.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: The Spacetalk voyage continues with a pair of prime reworkings of Avant Garde's sleazy yet soulful white funk bomb 'Everybody's Lover'. Whether you turn to the slow rolling vocal extension from Jaz & Party Dad or the beefed up bump of Mudd's Dub, you'll have everything you need to make the dance floor move. Totally essential tackle here!

After launching with a killer reissue of a private press gem from Morrison Kincannon, Spacetalk presents its’ first compilation: a superb selection of soul, disco and boogie obscurities curated by noted Parisian crate-digger and DJ Jeremy Underground. "Beauty" has its’ origins in a chance encounter between Jeremy and Spacetalk co-founder and Psychemagik Danny McLewin at Bestival last summer. Having completed his regular festival set - keeping the dancefloor moving with his more familiar house and US garage sound - Jeremy was treating the crowd at Maceo’s, the renowned backstage bar usually found at Glastonbury, to a tasty selection of soul, disco and boogie obscurities. Danny was impressed, introduced himself to the My Love Is Underground label founder, and several hours later the duo had hatched a plan for Spacetalk’s first compilation. A renowned digger, the Parisian is no stranger to putting together high quality compilations, having previously mined his house collection for two volumes of My Love Is Underground on Favorite Recordings. "Beauty", though, is the first collection to showcase the depth and variety of his record collection. Stuffed full of rare, hard-to-find and little-known gems, it confirms the Frenchman’s status as one of Europe’s most open-minded record collectors. Amongst its’ 15 tracks you’ll find the Creative Arts Ensemble’s spiritual soul-jazz gem “Unity”, the samba sunshine of Leila Pinheiro, the folksy, Latin-tinged breeziness of Ron Rinadli’s “Mexican Summer”, and the dewy-eyed, late night soul of Nu-Cleus’s ridiculously hard-to-find “Needing A Woman”. The beating heart of the compilation, though, is a selection of heady, heart-warming cuts that blur the boundaries between Philly soul, disco, jazz-funk and boogie. These include the sparkling, synth-laden 1981 boogie of “Do Your Dance” by Shades Of Love (whose members included future ‘80s soul/disco star Meli’sa Morgan), the jazz-funk inspired library grooves of Christer Norden’s “Lay Back”, and the smooth, post-boogie soul of Richardi Mac’s superb “Told You So”. Oh, and “Let Love Flow” by Jamaican singer Sonya Spence, a deliciously sweet and loved-up disco-soul shuffler infused with the distinctive swing of the Caribbean.
These are just some of the highlights; repeat listens will uncover new favourites, hidden gems, and impossible-to-find cuts from the crates of one of Europe’s most celebrated DJs.


STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: After two breathless sets of rare and raucous house for his ‘My Love Is Underground’ series, renowned Parisian digger Jeremy Underground shows off his softer side with this impeccably curated selection of soul, jazz and boogie on the newly minted Spacetalk. Swapping the stomping 4/4 of his previous work for samba sway and disco shuffle, the Frenchman raids his racks for a dozen of the deepest and most obscure soul and jazz cuts around, captivating minds and moving feet in the process.


Latest Pre-Sales

171 NEW ITEMS

The 29th @dinkededition will be announced tomorrow at 11am. Keep those 👀 peeled and get ready to make those pre ord… https://t.co/BxPUtV5tGv
Wed 21st - 3:44
This Sunday we celebrate the launch of our beer ‘Nickel In The Slot’ which has been brewed in collaboration with… https://t.co/VymKBBCfc3
Wed 21st - 3:41
We have three copies to give away of the @KimletGordon 'Sketch Artist' 12" (individually stamped and Ltd to 500 cop… https://t.co/fyELjZ45Y4
Wed 21st - 7:56
Founding member of @thesonicyouth @KimletGordon returns with her new album on @matadorrecords Formats include a… https://t.co/UWzEaWC5Gz
Tue 20th - 2:01
E-newsletter —
Sign up
Back to top