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TEMPLES

Temples

Hot Motion

    It is one of the brilliant facets of recorded music that while it can frame forever in time one of humanity’s most fluid art forms, those captured sounds themselves can go on to become an active launchpad for the ideas, memories, emotions and feelings of those listening. Returning with their third album, Hot Motion, Temples have not just provided a strong demonstration of this dual static/frenetic nature, but they’ve created a record that revels in this beautiful contradiction.

    A brilliantly crafted, thoughtfully recorded collection, the album’s propulsive, seemingly immediate songs soon reveal an impressive depth of ideas and energy with subsequent listens because, as its title warns, Hot Motion is not a record that stands still.

    “I’m excited for people to experience these songs for the first time,” declares singer and guitarist James Bagshaw. “They are constructed in such a way that the album should feel relatively instantaneous, but we did not water down our creative ideas. Getting that balance can be hard, perhaps on the last record on some songs we used too many layers to create depth, but making this album we discovered that depth doesn’t simply come by layering things, it can come from the intensity of an idea.”

    While proud of 2017’s electronically orchestrated Volcano, the trio – completed by bassist Tom Walmsley and guitarist Adam Smith – feel they have reconnected with the verve and spirit of their debut, 2014’s Sun Structures, although Hot Motion proves as unique and forward-thinking as any Temples album.

    “There’s something more primal about this record,” suggests Walmsley of its energy. “We didn’t want to complicate things. We wanted it to have a more robust feel to it and focus more on guitars. Having less on there, but making everything sound as big as possible. I’ve always wanted our records to sound quite grand and larger than life, but we achieved that with some more earthy sounds in this time.”

    As with the band’s first two LPs, the group recorded the album themselves in Northamptonshire, although this side of Temples as evolved too. “We’ve gone from bedroom to living room to a dedicated space. We could all set up in the same room and allow things to play out a lot more like a band. That played a huge part in the sound of the record,” says Walmsley, although despite the extra room Hot Motion remains a home recording like its predecessors.

    "The room is a 300 year-old outbuilding at my house,” continues Bagshaw. “I spent two years fixing it up because it had a leaky iron roof on it. It was nice to work in a space which had a little charm to it but still felt like home recording.”

    That space fed directly into Temples vision. While retaining their enviably poppy instincts, the band created a host of brand new guitar sounds for this record and also took a lead from the “simplicity” of some 70s rock recordings which ensured the fundamentals behind each track are organic and original. “We were hiding less behind synth sounds and delays, which meant that the pureness of the melodic construct of each song was more thought through,” explains Bagshaw. “There was an element of less is more in some places.”

    A glorious technicolour infuses much if the album, but there is a David Lynch-like undertone that adds a gravity to Hot Motion’s soaring moments. “It felt like there was a darker edge to what we were coming up with and we wanted to make sure that carried through across the whole record,” says Walmsley. “It’s not a ten track, relentless rock record from start to finish, it’s got a lot of light and shade and more tender moments, but that heavier, darker sound for us is something we wanted to make sure was in there and explore further.”

    The exemplar of this is the opener and title track Hot Motion. Starting with a seemingly innocent, crunked ice cream van-like riff, the song quickly bounds through a sonic landscape of shadowy valleys and exalted highs as the track captures Temples at their inventive best, and shares an expansive, irresistible energy with the listener.

    “Hot Motion is the feature piece,” declares Walmsley. “It was one of the first songs we put together for the record and it felt like it had all the marks and inspiration that we wanted the whole record to have, that was an important track.” Bagshaw agrees, suggesting that it set a tone for the next phase of Temples’ development. “Hot Motion is a better song than I ever dreamed it could be,” he says. “There was something in essence of that song to conjure with.”

    From the impressive opening, the rest of Hot Motion similarly boats an initial immediacy before unfurling greater depth and ideas, although each song cascades onto its own unique territory. Tracks like The Beam, It’s All Coming Out and Step Down offer swirling, enticing mini journeys, while the groove on Context “huge and a bit of a nod to an old school hip hop vibe” according to Bagshaw. “Songs like The Howl and Holy Horses have a slightly harder, heavier than we’ve done before,” adds Walmsley. “It felt like it was very important to retain that element on the record because it allowed us to open up with tracks like Atomise.”

    Lyrically too, this record has seen Temples embrace “purer, primal” feelings.

    “I’m really proud of You’re Either On Something lyrically because I feel deeply connected with the words – they’re so truthful,” admits Bagshaw. “On that track, I can hear influences of stuff that I listened to when I was growing up. There’s almost a nostalgia to that track, even though it’s very forward-looking. Equally, while the words on [album closer] Monuments are a little cryptic, it’s very much about the time we live in. I wouldn’t say it’s a political song but you can’t help but write about the things that are happening otherwise you’d just be a hermit.”

    Fizzing with ideas, bursting with kinetic energy and balancing an immediate impact with an enduring, timeless intensity, Hot Motion is an album that very much provides a snapshot one of Britain’s most progressive bands’ soul, while offering its audience a starting point for their own flights of emotion and imagination. Indeed, one of its creators is jealous that he cannot experience it anew too.

    “This record has really got me excited,” declares Bagshaw. “I really want to be on the receiving end of it more than any other record we’ve done. While we were making it I was thinking I wanted to be able to hear what it sounded like without working on it – I’d love to hear this out of the context in which it was made. I was really longing for that as we worked on each song, so I’m excited for people to experience these songs for the first time.”

    Don’t delay this life-affirming trip, Hot Motion awaits.

    FORMAT INFORMATION

    2xColoured LP Info: Limited transparent red and black marble edition.

    Indies Exclusive LP Info: Limited indies only zoetrope version. US import. Forest green & tan mixed vinyl with red & yellow splatter. Standard weight. Includes animated zoetrope labels, gatefold jacket, double-sided fold-out poster, custom inner sleeve, and digital download card.

    Temples

    Hot Motion + WRISTBAND

      PRE-ORDER THE LP OR CD FOR 1 FREE WRISTBAND FOR AN EXCLUSIVE EVENING OUTSTORE GIG AT THE SOUP KITCHEN IN MANCHESTER ON MONDAY 30TH SEPTEMBER. WE ALSO HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF WRISTBAND ONLY PURCHASES AVAILABLE. 

      It is one of the brilliant facets of recorded music that while it can frame forever in time one of humanity’s most fluid art forms, those captured sounds themselves can go on to become an active launchpad for the ideas, memories, emotions and feelings of those listening. Returning with their third album, Hot Motion, Temples have not just provided a strong demonstration of this dual static/frenetic nature, but they’ve created a record that revels in this beautiful contradiction. 

      A brilliantly crafted, thoughtfully recorded collection, the album’s propulsive, seemingly immediate songs soon reveal an impressive depth of ideas and energy with subsequent listens because, as its title warns, Hot Motion is not a record that stands still. 

      THIS SHOW IS STRICTLY OVER 18's - PLEASE BE AWARE THAT ID MAY BE REQUIRED AT THE VENUE.

      WRISTBANDS CAN BE COLLECTED WITH YOUR PURCHASE FROM DAY OF RELEASE. WE ADVISE SELECTING THE 'PICK UP INSTORE' OPTION AT CHECKOUT RATHER THAN RISKING POSTAGE DELAYS AS THE GIG IS VERY CLOSE TO RELEASE DATE.


      FORMAT INFORMATION

      Coloured LP Info: Limited transparent red and black marble edition.

      Indies Exclusive LP Info: Limited indies only zoetrope version. US import. Forest green & tan mixed vinyl with red & yellow splatter. Standard weight. Includes animated zoetrope labels, gatefold jacket, double-sided fold-out poster, custom inner sleeve, and digital download card.

      Wristband Only Info: IMPORTANT - this gives you access to the gig on Monday 30th September ONLY. It does not entitle you to a copy of the album. Max 2 per person.

      Since its inception in 2016, Isle Of Jura has joined the elite ranks of Music From Memory, Stroom, Growing Bin and Left Ear, treating us to a string of essential reissues as well as the finest in original Balearic, ambient and bedroom boogie productions. After killer reissues of Escape From New York, Holy Ghost Inc., Q and Brian Bennett and the ace "Transmission One" compilation of rarities & edits, Kevin Griffiths launched the Temples of Jura sub-label with a split 12" of original music from Len Leise and himself. Now the label head returns to his Jura Soundsystem moniker to give us an extended EP / mini album of Balearic beat, dreamy dub, future primitive funk and medicated boogie. 
      Griffiths opens the set with the percolating bassline, naunced percussion and mythic vocal of "Carafe Denim", a hypnotic bit of proto house which I imagine plays nicely next to the aforementioned Holy Ghost Inc. Next up, "Mamma Capes" grooves top down along the coast road, all synth mallet circles, bongo laced percussion and headband guitar riffs #WellBalearic.
      After the spirit lifting palate cleanse of ambient interlude "Monster Skies", we skip to the B-side, soaking up the squelching bass, well tempered synth lines and e-funk flavours of "Boogie Tune", a future facing hit of retro...boogie in tune with the recent sound of Naples. I can't get enough of the shaker-laced drum-box shuffle of "Parrot Rhythmic Space Jam", a slow rolling bomb with rubbery bass, spaced out electronics and a hint of the tropics which reminds me of those early Andras Fox productions. Harnessing the finest ingredients of 80s esoterics, "The Lantern Story" brings the curtain down with a swell of muted trumpet, acoustic guitar and immersive delay - an audio massage for modern life.

      Kikagaku Moyo started in the summer of 2012 busking on the streets of Tokyo. Though the band started as a free music collective, it quickly evolved into a tight group of multi-­‐instrumentalists. Kikagaku Moyo call their sound psychedelic because it encompasses a broad spectrum of influence. Their music incorporates elements of classical Indian music, Krautrock, Traditional Folk, and 70s Rock. Most importantly their music is about freedom of the mind and body and building a bridge between the supernatural and the present. Improvisation is a key element to their sound.

      The shifting dimensions of Masana Temples, fourth album from psychedelic explorers Kikagaku Moyo,are informed by various experiences the band had with traveling through life together, ranging from the months spent on tour to making a pilgrimage to Lisbon to record the album with jazz musician Bruno Pernadas. The band sought out Pernadas both out of admiration for his music and in an intentional move to work with a producer who came from a wildly different background.

      With Masana Temples, the band wanted to challenge their own concepts of what psychedelic music could be. Elements of both the attentive folk and wild-­‐eyed rocking sides of the band are still intact throughout, but they’re sharper and more defined.

      More than the literal interpretation of being on a journey, the album’s always changing sonic panorama reflects the spiritual connection of the band moving through this all together. Life for a traveling band is a series of constant metamorphoses, with languages, cultures, climates and vibes changing with each new town. The only constant for Kikagaku Moyo throughout their travels were the five band members always together moving through it all, but each of them taking everything in from very different perspectives. Inspecting the harmonies and disparities between these perspectives, the group reflects the emotional impact of their nomadic paths. The music is the product of time spent in motion and all of the bending mindsets that come with it.


      After curating a slew of totally essential reissues, Adelaide's Jura crew kick off a new offshoot, Temples Of Jura, catering for original artist material from a variety of genres. Their inaugural 12" brings us an intergalactic journey into dubspace piloted by Melbourne sensation Len Leise and the Jura Soundsystem themselves. Bouncing out the A1 with a boing of spring reverb and a swirl of space echo, "Dear Adrian" is Len Leise's tribute to On-U soundbwoy and dub pioneer Adrian Sherwood. Though the track grunts and moans like a Sherwood classic, Len's trademark blend of sunny melody and organic texture moves things in a more Balearic direction. Jura Soundsystem make their debut with a dub tryptich, spinning "Udaberri Blues" into three distinct versions. Rootsy and grooving, the track boasts a gorgeous psychedelic guitar line, echo drenched vocals and trippy fx, which truly come into their own on the uber-Balearic and entirely beatless "Space Mix". First among equals however is the MASSIVELY baggy, pilled up pump of the Dub Version, an immersive chugger in tune with Holy Ghost Inc.'s "Walk On Air". 

      STAFF COMMENTS

      Patrick says: Isle Of Jura take a break from their expert reissue program with a four track grand slam of sonic excellence, served on a dub tip. Len Leise gets loose with the pedal board, paying homage to UK dub king Adrian Sherwood, while the Jura Soundsystem steal the show with Balearic smash "Udaberri Blues". Expect to hear the "Dub Version" rip 'Nado apart in the very near future.

      Twenty years ago Cypress Hill was on top of the world, with two chart topping albums and several number one singles. Upon its release on Halloween, "Temples of Boom" might have illustrated their total disregard for the commercial success they’d enjoyed up until that point. This album was darker. The beats were spookier. The lyrics were grim. Even the album cover had a gloomier look, which is saying a lot when looking back at Black Sunday’s cover. It seemed that instead of riding the success of their previous two platinum albums they were heading in the opposite direction, pop culture be damned. Then something strange happened: "Temples of Boom" went platinum. B-Real, Sen Dog, and Muggs had put out an album that was all about them, not the mainstream or Columbia Records, and it worked. The fans remained steadfastly open to something new. 

      FORMAT INFORMATION

      2xLP includes MP3 Download Code.

      It doesn’t take too long with Volcano to realise that, while all the things that made the band special the first time around remain intact, a noticeable evolution has taken place. It’s there from the outset: the beefed-up beats of Certainty reveal an expanded sonic firmament, one in which bright synth hooks and insistent choruses circle around each other over chord sequences that strike just the right balance between nice and queasy. “If there’s a sense of scale,” says lead singer James Bagshaw, “It was really just a result of implementing a load of things that we didn’t know about the first time around.” Co-founding member and bassist Thomas Walmsley describes a record in which “we discovered a lot as we went along, and the excitement at having done so radiates

      One thing you do notice is that it’s harder to spot the influences this time around. It would be disingenuous to evade the psych-pop tag, for sure, but mystical language has been supplanted by something a more direct – and while those influences are still there, it’s no longer possible to pick them out. They’ve been broken down and blended together – fossilised into a single source of creative fuel, so that what you can hear this time around, sounds like nothing so much as Temples. This is the sound of a band squaring up to their potential.

      STAFF COMMENTS

      Andy says: More synthy than their debut but crucially just as hyper-melodic, Temples bring the magic of a bygone era right into the present with huge aplomb. It's a beautiful thing.

      FORMAT INFORMATION

      Coloured LP Info: Neon orange indies exclusive.


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