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BUREAU B

Die Wilde Jagd

Die Wilde Jagd

    Music from the "Rauhnächte" - DIE WILDE JAGD go hunting in the thicket of Neo-Krautrock, Electronica and Synthpop.

    Every year anew, during the Rauhnächte (those harsh nights between Christmas and Twelfth Day), the Wild Hunt (Die Wilde Jagd) rides across the country: raucous, jeering hunters from the nether world, whose path it is better not to cross. This is an ancient Germanic myth, which, in slightly varied form, is known in many parts of Europe and whose name Ralf Beck and Sebastian Lee Philipp have aptly chosen for their new project. The two first met in 2006 in Düsseldorf's Salon des Amateurs , a meeting place for new and established experimental musicians and artists, also known as Germany's "postpunk Hacienda". It seems no coincidence that Düsseldorf is the duo's founding city: their music is full of subtle references to local acts, such as Kraftwerk, NEU!, DAF, Liaisons Dangereuses, Pyrolator, the Krupps and Propaganda. Since their first meeting, Beck and Philipp regularly come together during the time of the Rauhnächte to record in Beck's well-equipped studio. Using the numerous analog keyboards and recording devices assembled there, and combining them with a diverse range of percussion instruments, they create their own "hunting music", which at times sounds unsettling, like swampland or a dark forest, but also urgent and pressing, like incandescent lasers or a hypnotic dance. Their soundscape is marked by repetitive guitar loops, electronic percussion, drums and synthesizers. Booming tom-toms and medieval-sounding flutes herald the start of the hunt. Whispering, reciting voices conjure up the spirits of the woods, while synthetic sounds, melodies and noises flit about before they are re-captured, structured and grounded by crystalline beats and pulsating bass lines.

    About the musicians: Ralf Beck is a musician and producer from Düsseldorf. He has released several albums as part of the duo Nalin & Kane, as well as under the name Unit 4. He collects old synthesizers and effect pedals and has already worked together with Karl Bartos. In his studio Uhrwald Orange he has recorded music by Propaganda, Kreidler, Black Devil Disco and many more.

    Sebastian Lee Philipp is part of the Berlin-based electro-wave duo Noblesse Oblige and composes music for theatre and radio plays. Between 2001 and 2006 he lived in London where he ran the club night "Caligula" and performed as a DJ.

    Schneider Kacirek

    Radius Walk

    Another dose of whirring rhythms and dark drones courtesy of Stefan Schneider and Sven Kacirek. This time around they have introduced the beguiling tones of Swedish singer Sofia Jernberg on three pieces, taking their music to a new level.Since their debut release, they have toured extensively with the likes of John McEntire (Tortoise, The Sea and Cake).A fascination with repetitive rhythm is the common thread which runs through the musical development of both musicians: listen to Stefan Schneider in his other projects, the bands Kreidler and To Rococo Rot and his albums with Hans-Joachim Roedelius. Further evidence can be heard on Kacirek's solo albums, in particular on his much-lauded "Kenya Sessions". 

    Martin Rev

    Clouds Of Glory

      Martin Rev is best known as one half of the seminal duo Suicide (with Alan Vega). Listening to his solo albums, it becomes clear that Rev was responsible for the group’s music. Suicide mirrored the reductive and radical traits of the contemp- oraneous punk scene that was in the process of emerging, but their electronic, minimalist form of language was so unique, so innovative, that they would become a major influence on the likes of Daft Punk, Air and Aphex Twin. Alongside his work with Suicide, Martin Rev continued as a solo artist, releasing his eponymous debut album in 1980 on New York’s Infidelity label. Rev’s early solo excursions can be traced back to the original ideas which can be found – in modified form – in Suicide songs: as instrumental versions which have been texturally enriched, like a familiar figure which has nevertheless taken on a completely new existence.

      Clouds of Glory
      His second solo effort, was released on the French label New Rose in 1985, although the recordings on Clouds Of Glory actually dated back to the earlier part of the decade, following on from the Suicide sessions for the duo’s second album. Martin Rev remembers: “Clouds of Glory was produced from visual and musical sketches I had in mind which then coincidedwith an invitation by Marty Thau, previously Suicide’s manager, to take advantage of studio time he had accumulated from other projects. The essence of my ideas was then realized in the studio. Clouds was started in 1981 and completed in 1984 when additionalstudio time was made possible to complete it, based on the offer by New Rose Records.” In spite of Clouds Of Glory having been recorded with the sameequipment as the Alan Vega / Martin Rev Suicide album, it occupies a completely different space, evoking the solemnity of religious music through its underlying meditative tone. “I look now upon the album as part of a personal journey into the frontier of music; a process which is never ending in its revealing of possibilities to satisfy my musical aspirations.”

      Martin Rev

      Cheyenne

        Martin Rev is best known as one half of the seminal duo Suicide (with Alan Vega). Listening to his solo albums, it becomes clear that Rev was responsible for the group’s music. Suicide mirrored the reductive and radical traits of the contemp- oraneous punk scene that was in the process of emerging, but their electronic, minimalist form of language was so unique, so innovative, that they would become a major influence on the likes of Daft Punk, Air and Aphex Twin. Alongside his work with Suicide, Martin Rev continued as a solo artist, releasing his eponymous debut album in 1980 on New York’s Infidelity label. Rev’s early solo excursions can be traced back to the original ideas which can be found – in modified form – in Suicide songs: as instrumental versions which have been texturally enriched, like a familiar figure which has nevertheless taken on a completely new existence.

        Cheyenne
        Although it was not released until 1991, Martin Rev’s third solo album features a wealth of material from the year 1980. For “Cheyenne”, Rev created instrumental versions of many of the tracks which had formed the basis of the second Suicide LP entitled “Alan Vega / Martin Rev”. The sphere of Martin Rev’s influence and the relevance of his music may well be related to the fact that he was one of the first artists who succeeded in grasping the abstraction of electronic music, infusing it with a sense of immediacy built on raw energy. Whilst the likes of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass and Kraftwerk were busy digging in the electronic music garden, Martin Rev found inspiration in the streets of New York. Rev’s music is informed by characteristic influences of the city, a place where doo-wop harmonies intermingle with the hiss and hum of the metropolis, dissolving into a collage of noise. So it is that dreamy, chiming melodies blur into ominous whirrs and drones emanating from rhythm machines and layers of distorted synthesizer. This polarity between convergence and alienation describes something deeply American, as reflected in the track names and the cover image of a rodeo rider: “The idea came from the way the tracks sounded as instrumentals. They took on a different visually descriptive dimension, even more so in combination. The visualization was an immediate sound- scape of the American landscape. That’s where the titles and cover came from.” Many of the pieces found on Cheyenne can be traced back to the sessions for the second Suicide album Alan Vega / Martin Rev (1980) which was produced by Ric Ocasek, singer for The Cars. Almost a decade passed before Martin Rev got around to editing and developing the material. “Most of the album was recorded in 1980, but the remaining few tracks from 1988 into the early 90’s. The 80’s tracks all went under a concerted editing process, to make them work for me even better as instrumentals. I didn’t get around to that until there was an offer to release them, which was in the early 90’s as well.” Indeed, Cheyenne plays out like a rural, yet intense road movie, crossing a landscape rich in beauty and contradictions.

        Young Scientist

        Results, Not Answers

          When you think of the music to have emerged from Seattle, grunge and Sub Pop are probably the first things that come to mind. But Seattle was already home to a vibrant alternative music scene back in the 1970s. One of the most prominent synthesizer acts of the period was the trio Young Scientist. Influenced by the likes of Cluster, Harmonia and Tangerine Dream, they released their music exclusively on cassette. We are delighted to present their superb debut album from 1979, the hypnotic-meditative-cyclical "Results, Not Answers" on vinyl for the very first time!

          Solarize

          Nachtwerk (1991-1998)

            Since 1981, Wilfried Franzen and Thomas Grotz have been developing their own version of experimental pop music, which oscillates between song structures, noise, and psychedelic trance. Bass and keyboards form the instrumental substructure of the duo’s compositions, which are enriched with guitars, violin, piano, electronic percussions, and samples. After self-publishing various cassettes and cds, "Nachtwerk" is the first official release of SOLARIZE, which presents selected pieces from the years 1991 to 1998.

            Bernard Xolotl

            Last Wave

              French electronic music from California: "Last Wave", the fifth solo album by the artist and musician Bernard Xolotl, was originally released on cassette in 1982. He named himself after the Aztec god of lightning and death. His music is influenced by the Berlin school of electronic music. This reissue includes a previously unreleased bonus track (not on vinyl)! As a teen, Bernard Xolotl (born 1951 in France) was introduced to electronic music through the works of musique concrete composers like Pierre Henry and Pierre Schaeffer, although he found the early recordings of Pink Floyd to be more inspirational. During the early 1970s, Xolotl began creating music of his own, working in studios across Europe and the US before settling in California in 1974, where he slowly built his own studio. Between 1978 and 1981 he recorded four solo cassette albums. On his album "Last Wave" Xolotl expanded his musical palette with many new instruments such as the Yamaha CS60 and the PPG.

              Bernard Xolotl on the creating process of "Last Wave": The first "Last Wave" I started early on while still living in San Francisco, as a simple and longish piece which could be used as a background for the concerts I was giving with Daniel Kobialka and Richard Horowitz, both of whom I saw almost every day at that time. However, after I moved to the residential suburb of Marin to build up my studio, I kept adding tracks to it so it just became part of my next album. This was going to have more instruments and progressively, I got to do everything myself, playing and recording one track at a time. But mixing there was still out of the question, so I had to wait for the right opportunity to use the proper San Francisco studio with the best reverbs and acoustics. This took several years in the end and was the last album I didn't mix at home.

              Following the vaguely poppy shapes of 1980's album East West, his fith album L'Ethique saw ex-Heldon guitarist and synth wizard Richard Pinhas return to bigger and bolder band-like methods. After the release he disappeared from the limelight for nearly a decade and returned in the 1990s.

              Interviewed by "Electronics & Music Maker" magazine in 1982, Richard Pinhas spoke in buoyant terms about the future of his recording career. Having just unveiled his fifth solo album, L'Ethique, he was already scheming towards its follow-up. The next record. It would see him shift from analogue-based methods to digital systems. He expected the album to arrive in 1984. Little did anybody know that the mooted record would not actually materialise.

              The year after that interview took place, Pinhas was plunged into a long period of depression. "I stopped everything and didn't think I would ever come back to music," he remembers. "I decided music was no longer for me. I'd said what I had to wanted to say, and it was done. It was out of my head and out of my life." Thus, he sold all his synthesisers and tried to survive on their profits along with royalties from his back catalogue. L'Ethique now looked as though it was Pinhas' final artistic statement. It was a strong collection to go out on. L'Ethique saw Pinhas return to bigger and bolder band-like methods. His collaborators included bassist Bernard Paganotti and Clément Bailly, both of whom performed stints in the prog band Magma. Moog player Patrick Gauthier made a reappearance too. The line-up brought a phat and forceful feel to the crunching jazz-rock fusion of 'Belfast' and 'Dedicated To K.C.', a vibrant space-rock stomper that lurks on some distant planet between the extraterrestrial habitats of King Crimson, Pink Floyd and Hawkwind.

              Part 1 of 'The Western Wall' has a particularly fast tempo. Interspersing these rockers sit some mellower moments. The title of the gorgeous synth rumination 'Melodic Simple Transition' seems far too modest. Despite its dark and brooding synth chords, the second instalment of 'The Western Wall' has a strangely calming effect on the senses. Pinhas disappeared from the limelight for nearly a decade under the weight of his depression. On the strength of this record, not to mention the works that preceded it, there's little wonder that so many labels and promoters were falling over themselves to persuade Pinhas to return to music, which he eventually did in the 1990s. "The real miracle is that I reconnected with the music-making process," says Pinhas on overcoming his reclusive years. "It is easy to fall, but very difficult to come back."

              Carl Matthews

              Call For World Saviours

                Mesmerizing D-I-Y electronic music from Cumbria, UK. Influenced by the Berlin School but, even more, by Tim Blake. Released 1984 on cassette only. This is the first time vinyl!

                Carl Matthews is by no means immune to the maelstrom of geo-caching notebooks. Krautrock (tick), guerrilla D-I-Y cassette-era artist (tick), under-rated UK electronic composer (tick). Man with a beard, surrounded by synths. (tick). Best of all, he was once described as the Edgar Froese of Cumbria.

                Is there a suspension bridge which connects Carl Matthews to the mainland European tradition of Harmonia, Cluster and Tangerine Dream? 

                Fourth solo album by French spacerock mastermind Richard Pinhas. 'East West' was his first and only album to be released by a major label (CBS). Some say it is his most commercial one, Pinhas doesn't see it that way. East West contained some surprises for those who were used to Heldon’s extended jams or the sparse and moody atmosphere of the previous year’s Iceland.

                East West’s average track length is four minutes, indicating greater accessibility. It also has a David Bowie cover, although Pinhas naturally chose one of the thin white duke’s more avant-garde moments: the foreboding 'Sense Of Doubt' from Heroes. East West’s synth-centric tracks, resemble siblings to the groundbreaking work of Kraftwerk. Others evoke Brian Eno or Tangerine Dream but hold their own distinct flavour.

                Richard Pinhas is one of the most important French electronic space rock musicians. Following five albums with Heldon, his band, he released solo records from 1977 on. His transition to 'solo' material gave the guitarist and synthesist an opportunity to work on material that was a little lighter and less constrained. 'Chronolyse' was his second solo album. At the time of "Chronolyse"’s gestation, Pinhas had been listening to a lot of classical music. Bach, Scarlatti and Wagner were key. So too were the new wave of American minimalist composers; Philip Glass in particular. After the out of this world "Variations" on the A-side, skip to the flip for the Dune inspired tone poem "Paul Atreides".

                Started as the so called 'Krautrock Guerrilla' in 2012, six years later the Berlin combo Camera are releasing their fourth full-length album. Customarily associated with the likes of NEU! and La Dusseldorf it is time to allow Camera to break free of the krautrock tradition and accept that they are very much doing their own thing now. Motto: "It's not repetition, it’s discipline"

                FORMAT INFORMATION

                Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                "Sowas von egal" is a collaboration between the Hamburg record label Bureau B and the Hamburg party series Damaged Goods. The divergent trajectories of a record company on the one hand and DJs on the other are happily aligned through a love and passion for seeking out, collecting, releasing and playing rare, remarkable music which simply needs to be heard.
                The Damaged Goods DJs created the party as a danceable party where they could play music beyond the regular and repetitious repertoire of (dark) electro clichés. The focus is on seldom heard post punk and synth wave from the 1980s. Many of the old records had only been pressed in small quantities, often sold exclusively at the respective bands' gigs. More than 30 years later, it is almost impossible to get hold of these tracks... until now. 

                STAFF COMMENTS

                Patrick says: I've declared my undying love for Neue Deutsche Welle many times before, so you'll understand I was very happy to see this Bureau B comp land in my lap. What's more, I don't know a single track on here, and it's full of killers!

                Qluster

                Elemente

                  "Elemente" - album number seven from the third incarnation of the legendary krautronic project Kluster/Cluster springs a surprise with a minor sensation: sequencer lines! Using an array of exclusively analogue instruments, Hans-Joachim Roedelius, Onnen Bock and Armin Metz have recorded eight tracks which, at one and the same time, are intrinsically hypnotic and sublimely beautiful.

                  FORMAT INFORMATION

                  Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                  Dennis Young

                  Synthesis / Electronic Music 1984-1988

                    Dennis Young is best known as the percussionist of the New York band LIQUID LIQUID, which is known for their piece "Cavern" from 1983, which in turn became very well known because Grandmaster Flash sampled it and used it as the basis for their hit "White Lines". But Young was more than just a member of the band, he produced plenty of his own music, much of it reflecting his passion for analog electronics. He was fascinated by the pioneers of the genre. In 2016 Bureau B released "Wave", a collection of pieces Young had issued on cassettes between 1985-1988. "Synthesis", by contrast, features tracks from 1984-1988 which have never been previously released.

                    Heldon

                    Third (it's Always Rock 'n' Roll)

                      Third album from the French spacerock electro combo masterminded by Richard Pinhas. Heldon's darkest work lays another stone in their sonic mosaic: synths,drones, fuzz and trippy improvisations. Intense Heldon!! There's something wicked happening on Heldon's third album It's Always Rock and Roll. Richard Pinhas' essential attack of searing guitar and space-bound synthesizer didn't change radically after the first two Heldon albums, 1974's Electronique Guerilla and 1975's Allez-Teia. But there's dark energy coursing through this double album, a chilly aura that makes even the quietest pieces shiver with tension. "We recorded this after having met with Philip K. Dick in California for two days," recalls Pinhas. "It was such an event for a 23-year old; he was to me one of the last real prophets. We talked about Jung, we talked about a lot of things. Maybe this encounter gave birth to all of Heldon Third." 

                      Heldon

                      IV (Agneta Nilsson)

                        Originally released 1976. The fourth Heldon album "Agneta Nilsson" sees Richard Pinhas and his changing entourage of musicians delve even deeper into Heldon's sonic universe. Their trusted array of hypnotic synthesizer sounds is underscored in places by drums and/or guitar. Mind-expanding stuff! Agneta Nilsson opens with a mind-paralyzing track that proves stillness can have a pulse. "Perspective I" spends ten minutes poring through tectonic layers of heavy sound, piling everything so thick that the song becomes like quicksand for your brain. It's one of the most daunting works in the Heldon catalog, made all the more impressive by how simple it is. It's just sounds put together and turned up. It's the vital alchemy of Pinhas's wizardry, deployed with maximum force.

                        Schlammpeitziger

                        Damenbartblick Auf Pregnant Hill

                          Schlammpeitziger came through in the same 90s wave of German eclectronica as Oval, Mouse On Mars, To Rococo Rot, Mike Ink etc..

                          Uncut - 8/10 review Feb 2018 - 'Blissed out electronic reveries'.

                          FORMAT INFORMATION

                          Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                          Cluster

                          Qua

                            The last studio album by the legendary krautronic duo (Dieter Moebius/Hans-Joachim Roedelius), recorded 2009 in Ohio by Tim Story "Seventeen miniature worlds, some icy, some warm, all infused with that Cluster elusiveness and unpredictability. Playful, dark, funny, human, Qua captures that deceptive Cluster heartbeat - unmistakably modern but utterly timeless."

                            Sounds of celestial beauty and infernal force: Brockmann // Bargmann (Ex-Camera) celebrate keys, guitars and effects Esteemed for their improvisational audacity, hurtling forwards to a motorik beat, there is another side to the Berlin "Krautrock Guerilla" trio Camera which sees them explore landscapes of sound. This is exactly what the two founder members Franz Bargmann (guitar) and Timm Brockmann (keyboards) present to us on their purely instrumental debut album "Licht". Harmonic and melancholic, tender and tough, planar and rhythmic - yet never dull.

                            STAFF COMMENTS

                            Barry says: Half-way between the vast progressive sound sculptures of Pink Floyd and the astral arpeggios and twinkling oscillators of Kraftwerk lie Brockmann // Bargmann (and Camera). Grand, climaxing pieces built upon subtle foundations of ambience and percussion, blooming into soaring otherworldly cosmic trips. If you like Caverns Of Anti-matter, this is a cert.

                            FORMAT INFORMATION

                            Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                            Moebius Story Leidecker

                            Familiar

                              Dieter Moebius (1944-2015) - one half of the legendary duo Cluster and the godfather of electronic krautrock - was one of the most important protagonists of avant-garde electronic music in Germany. The Americans Tim Story and Jon Leidecker are two electronic musicians who could not be more different to one another. Story is known for his warm soundscapes whilst Leidecker has made an name for himself, or rather for his "Wobbly" pseudonym, with experimental adventures in sound. He is also a member of the music and art collective Negativland.

                              Harald Grosskopf & Eberhard Kranemann

                              Krautwerk

                                Harald Grosskopf and Eberhard Kranemann transmit cosmic sonic visions of today, tomorrow and beyond in one of the most exciting collaborations in recent years. Harald Grosskopf played on the early Klaus Schulze albums and recorded with Ashra..  Eberhard Kranemann co-founded the electronic bands Kraftwerk, NEU!

                                FORMAT INFORMATION

                                Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                                Conrad Schnitzler

                                Filmmusik 2

                                Part 2 of the double release - now with historically correct titles In the year 1975 Conrad Schnitzler recorded various pieces of music to accompany films which had yet to be made. Fittingly, he labelled this collection of songs "Filmmusik". Only one of the tracks - "Gute Fahrt" (Nice Journey) - would ultimately be paired with a film, now traceable on the internet for all to see. The music is included on Part 1 of our Filmmusik double release, erroneously entitled "02/1980". Why the incorrect title? The tapes which served as source material for our two Filmmusik releases were copied onto two data carriers then mislabelled. To be precise, one label was accurate - "Filmmusik 1975 A" - but the other, "Filmmusik 1980 B", was not. All the tracks had been created in the same year, so it should have read "1975 B". In the absence of actual song titles, we simply gave them numbers. Ignorant of the above mentioned film at the time, we called the track "02/1980", when we should have called it "02/1975 B" or, as we would later discover, "Gute Fahrt". Shortly after we released "Filmmusik 1", Jin Kawai, curator of the official Schnitzler website www.fancymoon.com, contacted us to set us right. In 2009, whilst sorting through reels of film (some shot by Schnitzler himself) and music to upload to the site, Kawai was particularly drawn to one piece entitled "Gute Fahrt". Were there any more tracks like this? Schnitzler told him there were and sent Kawai all of the other recordings. One half of "Filmmusik 2" comprises tracks from the 1975 series, the other half is a 23 minute piece with the title "Lichtpunkte und schwarze Zeichen". This music was actually written for a film (which can also be found on the internet, naturally) in 1978. We were delighted to find it in 2015 and enthusiastically searched the Schnitzler archives for more of the same. This led us to the (in some cases, incorrectly labelled) 1975 recordings and the rest is history.

                                Various Artists

                                Magnetband

                                EXPERIMENTELLER ELEKTRONIK-UNDERGROUND DDR 1984-1989
                                compiled by Jestram, Konden, Lippok, Papenfuß

                                CD and LP including linernotes by Alexander Pehlemann. 

                                Inspired by Punk and Post Punk, vibrant scenes dedicated to independent self-actualisation by means of sound circulated on self-distributed cassettes, in the 80s the cheapest and fastest medium, were developing not only in the FRG but also in the GDR (=DDR). The artefacts from that era tell of a stance of refusal in practice, and of the possibility to charge up on a high level, in spite of everything. "Magnetband" features 14 exciting experimental-electronic pieces from the GDR that originally have been released between 1984 and 1989 on cassettes only.

                                Cluster

                                Cluster Kollektion 06: 1971-1981 Compiled By John McEntire

                                The first ever (!) compilation of Cluster recordings is released in the KOLLEKTION Series. Compiled by John McEntire (Tortoise / The Sea & Cake).

                                Cluster's influence on the development of electronic music cannot be overstated. The original trio of Conrad Schnitzler, Hans-Joachim Roedelius and Dieter Moebius released two seminal albums as Kluster before Roedelius and Moebius replaced the K with a C and continued as a duo. They produced eight albums in their most innovative period between 1971 and 1981, two of them together with another pioneer of electronic music, Brian Eno.

                                Cluster anticipated much of what would later emerge in such varied styles as industrial, ambient, electro and even synthpop. Some call Cluster's music avant-garde, others Krautrock or Kosmische Musik. Few would dispute their immense influence on the music of younger generations, even though commercial success largely eluded them. Hence their first album, as a microcosm of their entire oeuvre, made the list of "100 Records That Set The World On Fire (While No One Was Listening)" in "The Wire" magazine, the ultimate purveyor of good taste.

                                About John McEntire: Drummer/percussionist; recording engineer/producer. Founding and current member of Tortoise and The Sea & Cake; former contributing/touring member of Red Krayola and Gastr Del Sol. Extensive international touring with these groups and many others. Recording/remixing projects include work with: Modest Mouse, Yo La Tengo, Broken Social Scene, Stereolab, Teenage Fanclub, Jaga Jazzist, The High Llamas, The Fiery Furnaces, Spoon, Blur, and hundreds more. As a member of Tortoise, numerous collaborations with artists such as Tom Ze, Daniel Lanois, Bonnie "Prince" Billy, Cluster, The Ex, Fred Anderson, and Mouse On Mars. Owner/operator of Soma Electronic Music Studios in Chicago, IL since 1995.

                                STAFF COMMENTS

                                Barry says: What can be said about Cluster (Kluster/Qluster) that hasn't already been said? Inspiration behind a thousand analogue dreams, and purveyors of the most influential electronic vibes of the past 50 years. Here lies a collection, previously un-collated of some of their greatest works.

                                From 1971 to 1977, Peter Baumann was a member of the legendary Berlin band TANGERINE DREAM. The group were pioneers of the so called Berliner Schule (Berlin School) which had such a profound impact on electronic music. He produced a number of momentous albums at his Paragon Studio (by the likes of Conrad Schnitzler, Cluster, Hans-Joachim Roedelius) and also enjoyed success as a solo artist. His first two solo works are now being reissued with extensive liner notes and rare photographs. The influence of Tangerine Dream can clearly be heard on "Romance 76", although the arrangements are comparatively minimalist-a state of affairs for which David Bowie can be held partially responsible (see below).

                                With Peter Baumann on board, Tangerine Dream grew into one of the most influential bands in electronic Krautrock, sited somewhere between experimental electronica and progressive rock. Open to new ideas, Baumann's positive aura and eagerness to experiment galvanized the band's music almost instantaneously. His catchy melodies, rich in positivity, propelled Tangerine Dream into the charts.

                                After five years of chart appearances and extensive touring through Europe and North America, punctuated by several albums-including "Atem", John Peel's nominated import album of 1973-Baumann called time on his solo career with "Romance 76". "We found some time between tours and record productions, so Edgar recorded a solo disc and helped Christoph and me to develop our own music too. 'Romance 76' resulted from the urge to create new music. I felt we had begun repeating ourselves in Tangerine Dream and I was keen to discover new things, to carry on experimenting. Improvisation had been common to us all, but on your own it isn't quite so simple. I started to work on my own pieces." This shift in focus led him to leave Tangerine Dream towards the end of 1977. He and a friend set up the Paragon Studio in Berlin, which would earn a prominent place in music production history, but that's another story.

                                Still a member of the band in 1976, Baumann rented a hall in the ufaFabrik, Berlin to record "Romance 76". Sonic similarities to Tangerine Dream can be explained by the fact that the group used the same space for gig rehearsals, giving Baumann access to their instruments. The distinctive sound of a modular synthesizer system christened "The Big One" can be detected on "Romance 76", for example, along with a Mellotron.

                                Some tracks on the album, such as "Romance" and "Phase By Phase", are relatively minimalist in character. This airiness lends the unusual synth sounds space to unfold in all their glory. A state of affairs for which David Bowie is partially responsible, as Baumann recalls: "We were in Berlin and met him for dinner, then he would call in while I was recording the album, listening carefully to what I was working on. I explained to him what still needed to be done, but Bowie suggested: 'Leave it as it is, there's enough there already.'" At which point Baumann decided to look at the tracks in question as finished.

                                The beat hammers like the pulse of a pair of lovers on the run from a gang of racist thugs - the sound is manic, but from it speaks a seemingly insurmountable inner strength. This arch of tension is home to Camera. The Berlin band is rightly compared with icons of seventies Krautrock such as Neu! and La Düsseldorf, with a tight and driving sound, yet they are still somehow unpredictable. Hardly any other band understands how to mutate tiny musical nuances into volcanic eruptions like they do. Camera is a motor running at full throttle, where an explosion could occur at any second. Once you have embarked on this crazy journey, you will be fascinated by the alternating current somewhere between a flash flood and roller coaster running off the rails. The cascades of sound convey a blurry image of a boundless desire to revolt, with each blink of an eye threatening to end in purgatory, yet it is damned near indestructible.

                                Michael Drummer is the ethereal Indian paleface who pummels his drums at every show as if we're in the midst of a 17th Century incarnational ritual. In Steffen Kahles, who hails from the world of film music, he has found the musical partner he needed to enrich the tribal kraut beat with diverse motifs and bold sounds. On the third Camera album "Phantom of Liberty", we hear the clever use of playful sounds such as synths that beam us back into the Commodore 64 computer games of 1984; or slightly cranky keyboard pads, as if created by deliberately manipulating the speed of an old tape machine. With "Phantom of Liberty" Camera show that they have become more mature and complex without losing any of their tremendous energy.

                                STAFF COMMENTS

                                Laura says: This third album from Berlin trio Camera continues along a similar, if slightly more meandering, Kraut-rock path as their previous releases, a path already well trodden by the likes of Neu! and La Düsseldorf. The scope of their sound has expanded this time around though, and along with the pummelling drums and motorik rhythms we expect, there are a whole host of keyboard experiments going on: fluid synth washes, spacey swooshes, bleeps and squiggles. At times it sounds like they're soundtracking an 80s computer game, and at others the eerie electronics would be the perfect backdrop to a sci-fi movie. They've definitely upped their game on this album.

                                FORMAT INFORMATION

                                Vinyl comes with CD version of the album enclosed.

                                Adelbert Von Deyen

                                Sternzeit

                                  Adelbert von Deyen is a protagonist of the so-called Berlin School (Berliner Schule) of electronic music. On his debut album Sternzeit, he takes his time to develop sound structures, often drifting, floating blissfully into tonal interference. The listener also requires time and patience, but will be rewarded with a Zen-like state of contemplation. Adelbert von Deyen's musical backstory follows a less than typical path.

                                  He recalls: "To make the best use of my evenings, I finally bought a second-hand synthesizer, various electronic keyboard instruments and a tape machine, plus a few bits and pieces you need to make music. If I didn't have enough money, I asked the bank. During the day I worked as a retoucher for a newspaper and in the evenings, I composed my celestial electronic sounds, invariably deep into the night. It took me around eight months to finish my first compositions. I made tape copies which I sent out to various record companies. I struck lucky straight away: Sky Records in Hamburg were interested in my music and my first record was granted a worldwide release in 1978. I called it Sternzeit and I painted the cover myself."

                                  This was indeed a stroke of luck for a newcomer like Adelbert von Deyen. Founded by Gunter Kurber in 1975, the label had already hosted acclaimed releases from electronic and Krautrock stars like Michael Rother, Hans-Joachim Roedelius and even Brian Eno. A decent level of public interest was thus guaranteed.

                                  The Sternzeit album was issued as catalogue number SKY 019, one of the early releases on the label.In principle, many elements on this first album reappear on the two which followed (to be reissued January 2017): rich analogue layers, the swirling winds of the ARP Odyssey, masterful synth effects sprinkled so delicately.

                                  The second side of the record is devoted to a single track which is based on an incessant organ tone and played with vibrato, engendering a hypnotic sense of weightlessness. Keyboarders often taped down keys on their organs or synthesizers to create such effects back in the day. Adelbert von Deyen is an unconventional musician. When he performs, he sits down with his back to the audience, focussed on his arsenal of equipment. The way he has unreservedly followed his passions for music and artistic creativity speaks volumes about his free-thinking nature. Adelbert von Deyen mixed and produced this album in his own small studio on a Revox A77 tape recorder.

                                  Cluster

                                  1971-1981

                                    All original albums plus one unreleased (Konzerte 1972/1977), remastered by Willem Makkee Booklet featuring essays on each album and rare photos.

                                    Cluster’s influence on the development of electronic music cannot be overstated. The original trio of Conrad Schnitzler, Hans-Joachim Roedelius and Dieter Moebius released two seminal albums as Kluster before Roedelius and Moebius replaced the K with a C and continued as a duo. They produced eight albums in their most innovative period between 1971 and 1981, two of them together with another pioneer of electronic music, Brian Eno. Cluster anticipated much of what would later emerge in such varied styles as industrial, ambient, electro and even synthpop. Some call Cluster’s music avant-garde, others Krautrock or Kosmische Musik.

                                    Few would dispute their immense influence on the music of younger generations, even though commercial success largely eluded them. Hence their first album, as a microcosm of their entire oeuvre, made the list of 100 Records That Set The World On Fire (While No One Was Listening) in The Wire magazine, the ultimate purveyor of good taste.

                                    The box set contains all eight of the regular LPs which represent their main phase, plus a previously unreleased album of two live recordings from the years 1972 and 1977. All of the albums have been remastered by Willem Makkee. Asmus Tietchens has contributed an exclusive text on the evolution and significance of the band. The booklets also include essays on each individual album.

                                    FORMAT INFORMATION

                                    LP Box Set Info: 180g vinyl box set, limited to 1000 copies worldwide.

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                                    CD Box Set Info: Limited to 1500 copies worldwide.

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                                    Conrad Schnitzler

                                    Kollektion 05: Compiled By Thomas Fehlmann

                                    Things come full circle. In 1976 Thomas Fehlmann arrives in Hamburg to study art at the HfBK. In 1979 he attends a guest lecture by Conrad Schnitzler, who demonstrates to students how the 'extended definition of art' established by Joseph Beuys can be applied to music. This proves to be a crucial element in Fehlmann's decision to become a musician. And now, over 35 years later, he has compiled Bureau B’s fifth collection: 16 pieces from the early 1980s by the man who broadened his horizons, Conrad Schnitzler. The gateway to Schnitzler's sonic cosmos has been flung wide open.

                                    Conrad Schnitzler (1937-2011), composer and concept artist, is one of the most important representatives of Germany's electronic music avant-garde. A student of Joseph Beuys, he founded Berlin's legendary Zodiak Free Arts Lab, a subculture club, in 1967/68, was a member of Tangerine Dream (together with Klaus Schulze and Edgar Froese) and Kluster (with Dieter Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius) and also released countless solo albums. Thomas Fehlmann rose to prominence in the seminal band Palais Schaumburg with Holger Hiller. Their debut album in 1981 was a milestone in German post-punk music. In 1988 Fehlmann founded the Teutonic Beats label and in 1990 he became a member of The Orb. He has played an important role in Berlin's electronic and club scenes ever since, as a musician, producer, remixer and DJ.

                                    Thomas Fehlmann on this Kollektion: "So the question is, are we talking about a 'mix' or what is the most accurate way to define this kind of compilation? If 'mix' overreaches slightly, the fact remains that I have strung together various pieces from Conrad Schnitzler's white period - the CON series - in a seamless arrangement which creates its own state of dramatic tension. The tracks retain their original form and tempo. This is not a study in montage. I have restricted myself to picking the right moment to move from one piece to the next, cross-fading. Okay, I did edit one track. Mixing implies a deeper incursion into the source material, dismantling and reconstructing it in new combinations. I would have found that too crude a method when each individual piece carries its own unequivocal message. The sound is the sound of Conrad Schnitzler. I was looking for a form which would condense Conrad Schnitzler's versatility, his inventiveness and wit into a single journey. The new running order adds a certain friction to the aura of each as new connections are made. My choices were musical, not chronological, bathing these works from the early 1980s in new sensuous light. It is quite remarkable to see how intensely the sparks still fly. Preparing this collection closes an elementary circle in my life, without which I may have followed a completely different path."


                                    Harald Grosskopf is best known as drummer in the band Ashra and for Klaus Schulze and as an electronic musician. Following “Synthesist” (1980), “Oceanheart” was his second solo album. It may sound like a child of the 1980s, but in a compositional sense it is related to the Berliner Schule / Berlin School of the 70's
                                    .
                                    Tired of the rock format and excited by the freedoms promised by electronic music, Harald Grosskopf quit Wallenstein, a conventional rock band, in the mid-seventies to turn his attention to electronica. Grosskopf thus became the first drummer to specialize in the electronic music field. He played drums on Klaus Schulze’s albums “Moondawn” and “Body Love” and on YOU’s “Electric Day”. When Manuel Göttsching from Ash Ra Tempel asked him if he would consider enrolling as the regular drummer in the group now rechristened Ashra, he did not need to think about it for long. Grosskopf changed course again in the eighties, this time in pursuit of commercial success: he played in the NDW (Neue Deutsche Welle) group Lilli Berlin and backed Joachim Witt on his best-selling “Silberblick” LP, which featured the hit “Goldener Reiter”.

                                    Sky, the record company, were more than a little disappointed with the performance of Grosskopf’s first solo effort “Synthesist”, so there was no great sense of urgency as far as its successor was concerned. “They even halved my advance!” Grosskopf recalls. “Oceanheart” was released some six years after “Synthesist”. “The album title reflects my love of transcendental meditation, of course it might be taken for watery esoterics.” (A similar vibe was evident in the cover art, hence fresh artwork has been created for the reissue.) Musical equipment for the production was limited by the label’s ongoing thrift programme. The first “Oceanheart” recordings took place “under the roof” in the Lilli Berlin Studio, Kreuzberg. They were completed at the Spandauer Studio by former Tangerine Dream member Christoph Franke. “We mixed everything down and recorded the drums there.” Harald Grosskopf again played everything himself, except for the tablas. In keeping with its predecessor, “Oceanheart” was no bestseller, but, like “Synthesist”, it attained cult status, rediscovered in recent years through the internet by a younger generation. Harald Grosskopf himself needed time to appreciate the work: “I only really discovered the musical quality of ‘Oceanheart’ years later. I finally realized that I had created something quite special.” - Christoph Dallach

                                    Kreidler / Automat

                                    Split EP

                                      THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2014 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

                                      2014 sees the 20th anniversary of German electronic pioneers Kreidler. There'll be a tour, a movie by Heinz Emigholz and new album release “ABC” (which has been recorded in Tbilisi, Georgia). Featured here is an unreleased outtake from the album session. Jochen Arbeit, Achim Färber and Georg Zeitblom have been collaborating under the name Automat since the end of 2011. Their debut album will be available from 4th April 2014, featured here are three unreleased outtakes from the album. The song “Berlin Wall” is a collaboration with Throbbing Gristle’s & Psychic TV’s Genesis Breyer POrridge.

                                      Electronic duo Ulrich Schnauss (A Long Way to Fall, A Strangely Isolated Place) and Mark Peters (of the band Engineers) return with a second collaborative album titled Tomorrow is Another Day, released by Bureau B. This second project offers a sublime exploration into their signature expressionistic landscapes while exploring the potential of a collaborative model in which Schnauss's keyboards and Peters's guitar work together in juxtaposition.

                                      Ulrich Schnauss, born in the industrial port town of Kiel in northern Germany in 1977, emerged in Berlin's drum 'n bass scene in the mid-1990s. Mark Peters was born in Liverpool in 1975 and embraced a deeply euphonic pop aesthetic that incorporated intricate formal structures. The two musicians met years ago when both were making shoegaze music and formed a close friendship. Schnauss joined Peters's band Engineers as a keyboardist in 2010. After the collapse of the second-wave shoegaze movement in the early 2000s, both musicians drifted away from the genre's dreamy, shimmering aesthetic and returned solidly to their own musical roots. Peters has subsequently explored classic, guitar-based music and Schnauss has returned to his origins as an electronica producer.

                                      Tomorrow is Another Day represents a maturing of the pair's creative process. Following their first collaborative album titled Underrated Silence (2012), which seamlessly blends the two instrumental voices into an integrated sonic landscape that delivers surprisingly intense emotion beneath the surface of its delicate composition, Schnauss and Peters subsequently began to craft a musical exchange in which each musician's contribution was emphasized in contrast to the other's voice. The differences in Schnauss' and Peters's musical backgrounds are highlighted and embraced as their two voices emerge in dialogue. Here, the synths are drier, the guitars more discreet. The shifting tonality of the music's richly layered patterning defines its composition with punctuated gestures as melodic lines emerge in sharper relief. With neither musical style overpowering the other, the effect is that of two equally masterful voices in coherent conversation, celebrating the dynamic nature of instrumental combination and exploring a new method of creative approach - one that allows for concurrence and dissent, in turn.

                                      Kreidler was founded in Düsseldorf in 1994 by Thomas Klein, Andreas Reihse, Detlef Weinrich and Stefan Schneider (who left to form To Rococo Rot) Kreidler have been asked to remix artists such as Depeche Mode, Einstürzende Neubauten and Faust among 20 others and cooperated with artists like Klaus Dinger (NEU!), Add (N) to X, Young Gods, Theo Altenberg, Momus, Leo Garcia, Pyrolator and Chicks on Speed

                                      'Den' is Kreidler's eleventh regular album It could be said that 'Tank' - Kreidler's critically acclaimed previous album - is a drum album. Not in the sense of the brute force of a Ginger Baker or a John Bonham, but more in terms of the elastic muscularity of a Budgie, a Robert Görl or a Klaus Dinger. So in the case of 'Den', if attempting yet another such broad categorization, one might draw attention to the album's viscous musicality. Indeed, for recording and mixing, Kreidler chose to work at LowSwing, a studio renowned for its round sonic character, with the magnificent Guy Sternberg at the controls. The album's opening track 'Sun' displays an inspired beauty that is perhaps reminiscent of Eno during those periods in which he was interested in songwriting. Pan-Asian counter-melodies interplay around the stoic but light architecture of 'Deadwringer'. And 'Rote Wuste' is a mysterious painting, spanning a vast emotional arc between it's dark beginnings and the possibility of a conciliatory resolution. The heavily grooving 'Cascade' finds an utterly mesmerized Alex Paulick on guitar - just how many chord changes does Andreas Reihse get through? But one nice aspect of Kreidler is that those kinds of things hardly matter. Kreidler never burden the listener with strict didacticism. Everything flows naturally.

                                      The blue album from 1974 and was Schnitzler's second solo LP. Digipak reissue with liner notes by Asmus Tietchens, rare photos and six bonus track (CD + download only) On the red album, Konrad Schnitzler laid down the direction his musical artistry would take. The blue album ("Blau") offered confirmation of his intent. Maybe the "Rot" and "Blau" tracks were recorded in the same session. Structure, sound and timbre of both LPs are so similar as to suggest that this was the case (an unverified assumption nevertheless!). Far more important than this historical pedantry is the fact that Schnitzler included two brand new compositions on "Blau" which followed on seamlessly from the previous album. Quite simply, he had found his way, a course from which he would not stray as long as he lived.

                                      The so-called Berlin School (Berliner Schule) - with Konrad Schnitzler one of their number - had developed its own style of minimalist music. Clearly distinct from Anglo-American pop music, and no less removed from the minimalist art music of Steve Reich or Philip Glass, the focus here was on electronics and elementary rhythmics. The Berlin musicians showed no great interest in instrumental or vocal virtuosity, nor were they in thrall to exuberant interleaving of rhythm. With the aid of synthesizers and studio technology, they were bent on breaking into territory hitherto considered the province of a privileged elite, clouded in mystery and secrecy, resonating with uncharted sounds and noise. "Blau" is an archetypal example of this very phenomenon. Schnitzler's style was really too idiosyncratic ever to set a precedent, but he was, and still is, one of the most significant inspirations for pop music in more recent times. Already a figure of prominence, perhaps he will one day be elevated to the status of a legend.

                                      D.A.F.

                                      Ein Produkt Der Deutsch-Amerikanischen

                                        The debut by Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaft was a feat of musical pioneering. Later to find global fame as a duo, DAF's 1979 line-up of Robert Gorl, Wolfgang Spelmans, Kurt Dahlke (Pyrolator) and Michael Kemner created what was quite possibly the worlds first noise-rock album. Radical, brutish, instrumental.

                                        Originally released in 1979 on Warning Records (later Ata Tak)

                                        Reissue in digipak with liner notes, rare photos and memorabilia.

                                        True DAF connoisseurs will, of course, be aware of the early phase of the Dusseldorf-Wuppertal combo. But most fans of the subsequently world famous duo may well be taken aback when confronted with their debut album: forceful synth bass sounds, snappy rhythms, Gabi Delgado and leather all conspicuously absent. In their place, pure instrumental, unstructured noise-rock, played by long-haired and moustachioed types! A band can barely have undergone a more extreme metamorphosis. Gabi Delgado joined the band before the band discarded the name of YOU and christened themselves Deutsch- Amerikanische Freundschaft. A tape machine and two microphones were set up in Wolfgang Spelmans living room and ten days of unbounded improvisation ensued. And thus it was completed, Produkt der Deutsch- Amerikanischen Freundschaft ; 22 tracks, ranging from 19 seconds to three minutes in length. The influence of Can is clearly audible. Considering the fact that other prominent noise-rock bands such as Chrome, Flipper or even Sonic Youth recorded similar music at a much later date, this 'product of Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaf¨ should certainly be recognized as a pioneering work. Possibly even the first noise-rock album.

                                        Produced by the team at Machines With Magnets who have worked with Lightning Bolt, Clap Your Hands, Say Yeah, Fang Island and Battles

                                        Roedelius

                                        Roedelius Plays Piano

                                        In 1985 Hans-Joachim Roedelius was invited by Brian Eno (with whom he worked in the 70's on the Cluster & Eno projects) to play a solo piano show in London. Bureau B have now restored the only recording made of this very special performance, and here it is.

                                        Breathtakingly beautiful piano from the year 1985 - released for the very first time!

                                        In 1985, Hans-Joachim Roedelius was still perceived by the music community as an electronic artist. Yet ever since taking delivery of his Bösendorfer grand piano in 1983, his interest had grown in the most royal of instruments: the piano. Whilst staying with Brian Eno in 1985 (they had collaborated earlier in the seventies), Roedelius composed a wealth of new material on his friend's two grand pianos (or, as Roedelius would say: the music flew to him). He organized a series of concerts to introduce his new musical direction, with the Bloomsbury Theatre in London amongst the venues. Guests included Brian Eno and The Edge, with Roedelius taking the belated opportunity to use the artwork to thank them accordingly for their support. For Roedelius, this London concert remains one of the highlights of his career.

                                        The musicians: Ulrich Schnauss, born in Kiel in 1977, now residing in London, three solo albums released to date, Engineers keyboard player and an in-demand remixer (Mojave 3, Depeche Mode, Lunz/Roedelius, to name just a few). Mark Peters, born in Liverpool in 1975, bass player, guitarist, vocalist and songwriter in the British band Engineers, also three album releases to their name thus far.

                                        The music: synthesizer, piano, guitar and drum computer, a reduced, yet bacchanal instrumental combination of ambient, electronica and shoegaze sounds. Transporting the sound of shoegazer aesthetics into an electronic context, this is how Ulrich Schnauss once described his artistic goal. Influenced by bands such as My Bloody Valentine, Slowdive, Cocteau Twins and Chapterhouse on the one hand, yet wholly at ease with the electronica of bands like The Orb, Bionaut, Orbital, 808 State and unequivocally appreciative of veterans of the genre, Tangerine Dream or Manuel Gottsching for example. A brother in spirit of Robin Guthrie one might say, an apposite epithet for Schnauss. His collaborative partner Mark Peters might also be considered his soul brother. Through his band, Engineers, he has similarly found success in following the footsteps of his musical paragons. Engineers have released wonderful albums of dream pop, infused with the same spirit as the solo efforts of Schnauss.

                                        Hans-Joachim Roedelius

                                        Gift Of The Moment - Geschenk Des Augenblicks

                                          Tenth solo album, first released in 1984. His most commercially successful album to date.

                                          On “Gift of the Moment” Roedelius broke away unequivocally from purely electronic music. If “Lustwandel” and “Jardin au fou” had seen the process set in motion, this was the album that completed the transition. Following the “Selbstportraits”, which had at least been created through the use of electric organ and synthesizers, Roedelius focussed on the grand piano, sometimes accompanied by a cello, violin and guitar. Distant echoes of a not so distant musical past could only be detected in the occasional appearance of sparse chords played on a polyphonic synthesizer. The album wore a veil of delicate melancholy: no vibrant folk dances, no colourful carousels, no cheerful melodies. Instead, Roedelius offered a calm, almost detached form of music, openly acknowledging romantic heritage. “Gift of the Moment” eluded contemporary definitions of the “experimental” concept, as Roedelius was now experimenting in new, eclectic areas, too weighty, too grainy to be labelled “Proto New Age”. Roedelius was not striving for perfection, but for authenticity, a music stripped of disguise; and to this end he left little playing errors in the mix, fading out tracks rigorously to eliminate any bigger blunders.

                                          Originally released in 1971 on Philips, reissued later (with a different cover and different running order) on Sky. On Bureau B for the first time with the original running order and original Philips cover.

                                          The band: founded in 1971 by Hans-Joachim Roedelius and Dieter Moebius, both key figures in the German experimental scene for electronic and ambient music.

                                          The music: abstract, meandering streams of sound and noise. Epochal, experimental electronics - "Cluster 71" was the duo's debut album. According to The Wire "Cluster 71" is one of the 'One Hundred Records That Set The World On Fire'. Very few albums from Germany can lay claim to this honour. "Cluster 71" is a monster: the debut work from the year 1971 (actually just called Cluster) contains a mere three tracks (untitled) and is quite an ordeal for untrained ears - back then, at least. Yet the album pointed the way forward like no other electronic opus.

                                          1980 album from post Can project.

                                          Phantom Band is: Jaki Liebezeit (Can etc.), Rosko Gee (Can, Traffic), Helmut Zerlett (eg Dunkelziffer, Unknown Cases), Dominik von Senger (eg Dunkelziffer, Damo Suzuki Band/Network), Olek Gelba, Sheldon Ancel.

                                          Guest musician: Holger Czukay

                                          The music on “Phantom Band”: Can-style monotonic polyrhythms meets afrobeat, funk, jazz, disco, reggae, dub.



                                          The musician: Hans-Joachim Roedelius, born 1934; first release in 1969 with Kluster (with Dieter Moebius and Konrad Schnitzler). Active ever since as a solo artist and in various collaborations (with D. Moebius/Cluster, with Moebius and Michael Rother/Harmonia, with Brian Eno, to name just a few). One of the most prolific musicians of the German avant-garde and a key figure in the birth of Krautrock, synthesizer pop and ambient music.
                                          The music: easy, quiet analog-electronic music miniatures.
                                          "Wenn Der Südwind Weht (When The South Wind Is Blowing)" (1981) was his 7th solo album.

                                          Originally released in 1976; melodic and atmospheric, the blend of electronic rhythms and quirky bubbly sounds combined with piano and a few bits of guitar here and there to create pure bliss.

                                          'The evocative toybox melodies (usually the Roedelius compositions) on 1974's "Zuckerzeit" reached their peak with "Sowiesoso", courtesy of ambling pieces like "Dem Wanderer", the title track, and the vaguely Oriental "Halwa". The drum programs are still irresistibly simplistic (not to say simple), but even when Sowiesoso stretches out into primarily beatless terrain ("Es War Einmal", "Zum Wohl"), the album retains its power.' (All Music Guide)

                                          Classic Krautrock reissue, originally released in 1979. Cluster are one of the most important protagonists of the electronic avant-garde. Some credit them with having invented ambient music, others as pioneers of synthesizer pop, whilst to some they are firmly embedded in the Krautrock universe. There is some truth in all of these ideas. Although Cluster and 'rock music' are seldom mentioned in the same breath, their early works in particular are marked by a lack of structure and futuristic, cold soundscapes typical of the Krautrock variation known as 'Kosmische'. "Großes Wasser" was cluster's fifth album as a duo. New technology was deployed with an exactness designed to refine their (by this time – these recordings are from 1978) sophisticated and fully developed musical ideas. More than ever before in Cluster's history, acoustic elements can be heard, with the dulcet tones of the Paragon's Steinway grand piano taking centre stage. Electric bass, guitar, percussion and voice are all embraced. Consequently, "Großes Wasser" is anything but a solely electronic album. It is, however, one of those rare LPs, whose musical substance transcends its own age, still not sounding outdated. This is what really makes it so special.

                                          "Jardin Au Fou" is the second solo album by German keyboardist Hans-Joachim Roedelius, best known for his work with Cluster, Harmonia, and Aquarello. Recorded from April through July, 1978 at Paragon Studios in Berlin, it was produced by former Tangerine Dream member Peter Baumann and released by the French label Egg in 1979. The original release included 10 tracks but the final short piece, "Final", was left off the tracklisting on the original album cover.

                                          FORMAT INFORMATION

                                          CD Info: The CD features 6 additional tracks: three of the new tracks are remixes of material from the original recording while three others are newly released.


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