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TERRY

Terry Riley

Descending Moonshine Dervishes

    Originally recorded live in Berlin in 1975 and released by Kuckuck in 1982, Beacon Sound reissued the album in 2016 to widespread acclaim. Remastered by Rafael Anton Irisarri in 2016.

    Using just intonation and a modified organ, Riley conjures forth a rich and layered sound that challenges the Western ear, reflecting his associations with Indian classical singer Pandit Pran Nath and La Monte Young, whose 'Well Tuned Piano' was well underway. 'Descending Moonshine Dervishes' is a virtuosic and kaleidoscopic performance, standing as one of the finest works of a revolutionary composer and musician at the height of his powers.

    "'Descending Moonshine Dervishes' dates from 1975 and it belongs to a larger Dervish series of compositions whose origins predate Riley’s two signature works of minimalism, 'In C' (1968) and 'A Rainbow In Curved Air' (1969)… (the piece is) structured around just intonation, which stretches the listening experience into new areas. Played on a Yamaha organ with a bit of tape delay that allows Riley to duet with himself, the music of 'Descending Moonshine Dervishes' is an ear expansion that goes through skittering arpeggios and long, droning notes that indicate something of the many levels that it operates on."

    TRACK LISTING

    1. Part 1
    2. Part 2

    Buddy Terry

    Awareness - 2024 Reissue

    Following the highly-acclaimed release of Feeling Good and Inner Peace compilations, Wewantsounds is delighted to announce the reissue of two superb classic albums in our new Mainstream Records Original Classics series. The releases will be crammed with bonus material. Wewantsounds has gone back to the original negative to reconstruct the original artworks and will add many jaw dropping never-seen photo sessions and CD Bonus material with new liner notes. LPs will be released in glorious gatefold sleeves.

    TRACK LISTING

    1. Awareness (Suite): Omnipotence/Babylon/Unity/Umility [Trio For Two Bassists And Tenor]
    2. Kamili
    3. Stealin' Gold
    4. Sodom & Gomorrah
    5. Abscretions

    Terry

    Call Me Terry

      Call me Terry! It’s been a hot minute since we last heard from Terry, what’s he been up to? Five years on from their last album, ‘I’m Terry’, the Australian post-punk quartet proudly present their new record, ‘Call Me Terry’, for release on April 14th 2023.

      Terry is made up of pairs Amy Hill & Al Montfort, and Xanthe Waite & Zephyr Pavey who started playing together for the fun of it in 2016. Seven years, four albums and three EP’s later, Terry is ready to pick up the phone again. Over the past few years Terry have kept themselves busy - but not only with Terry things. On top of numerous releases with alternating side projects (Constant Mongrel, The UV Race, Primo!, Sleeper & Snake, Chateau, Rocky, the list goes on… ) members of Terry have moved interstate, undertaken studies, had children and started new fields of work.

      Terry began sharing the demos for ‘Call Me Terry’ online with each other in 2020 - as we all did - before getting together in 2021 at their trusty rehearsal space to record the beds. Overdubs were completed at Terry’s homes over the following year. Lyrically, in true Terry fashion, the record wastes no time in scrutinising Australia’s corrupt, colonial history. They sing it loud and sprawl it across the jacket of this record, highlighting the greed, privilege and entitlement of white, wealthy “Australia” which they won’t stand a second for.
      Musically, ‘Call Me Terry’ still has the classic Terry sound; the four vocals singing as one gang, sharp guitars and quirky, burbling synths, the rolling bass and drums, all amidst their clever, dancey pop songs. Since day dot it’s been hard to reference a band that really sounds like Terry, which is always amazing. Truly a sound of their own!

      But the sugar on top here may just be some of their finest horn, string and piano performances to date - all of which never feel crowded, cluttered or over-involved. More just excellent, necessary melodies. Rest assured Al still gives his famed Fuzz Factory a workout - and throws his tremolo into the pedal chain. It goes off. Tremolo is the order of the day for Amy and Xanthe too who also embrace the wobble, whilst Zephyr keeps the pulse of their politico-pop anchored.

      Terry isn’t afraid to call the shots and Terry isn’t afraid to point the finger. Listen to what Terry has to say.


      STAFF COMMENTS

      Barry says: Bright, blistering melodies and perfect vocal harmonies ride atop Terry's unmistakeable cheery post-punk groove. Bringing to mind the lighter side of Joanna Gruesome, but with an off-kilter electronic sway.

      TRACK LISTING

      SIDE A
      01. Miracles
      02. Centuries
      03. Gold Duck
      04. Balconies
      05. Market
      SIDE B
      06. Golden Head
      07. Gronks
      08. Jane Roe
      09. Excuses
      10. Days

      Terry Jennings

      Piece For Cello And Saxophone

        Saltern’s latest offering marks the first-ever release of “lost minimalist” Terry Jennings’ visionary 1960 composition, Piece for Cello and Saxophone, as arranged in just intonation by legendary composer La Monte Young for renowned cellist Charles Curtis. Born in Los Angeles in 1940, Jennings was a close associate of Young, Terry Riley, and Dennis Johnson, and an early adopter of minimalist tendencies, creating slow, sustained music, influenced by jazz, modalism, and late romantic classical music. Jennings died tragically in his early forties, most of his work lost to a chaotic life; however, his forward-looking music quietly exerted a lasting influence on composers including Young and Harold Budd. Composed over sixty years ago, Piece for Cello and Saxophone, foreshadows a number of movements in postwar avant-garde music.

        Despite the title, there is no saxophone on this album. At over eighty minutes, La Monte Young’s justly tuned realization of Piece for Cello and Saxophone for cello alone unifies and extrapolates Terry Jennings’ dense harmonies, creating an extended field of complex sonorities in motion, all brought to life by the immaculate playing of Charles Curtis. The recording captures Curtis in a performance from 2016 reflecting more than twenty-five years of dedication to the piece.

        TRACK LISTING

        A1. Piece For Cello And Saxophone (Part 1)
        B1. Piece For Cello And Saxophone (Part 2)
        C1. Piece For Cello And Saxophone (Part 3)
        D1. Piece For Cello And Saxophone (Part 4) 

        Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band

        Smokin The Dummy

          Recorded exactly two years after acclaimed visual artist and songwriter Terry Allen’s masterpiece Lubbock (on everything), the feral follow-up Smokin the Dummy is less conceptually focused but more sonically and stylistically unified than its predecessor it’s also rougher and rowdier, wilder and more wired, and altogether more menacingly rock and roll.

          Following the 1973 Whitney Biennial, in which songwriter and visual artist Terry Allen and fellow iconic artist Horace Clifford “Cliff” Westermann both exhibited, Allen maintained a lively long-distance correspondence and exchange of artworks and music with Westermann, whose singular and highly influential art he admired enormously. In a February 1981 letter to his friend and mentor, written shortly after the late 1980 release of his third album Smokin the Dummy, while he and his family were living in Fresno, California, Terry explains the genesis of the album title: Westermann died shortly after receiving this letter, enclosed with a Smokin the Dummy LP, the minimalist black jacket of which Allen suggested that Cliff fold into a jaunty cardboard hat if he didn’t like the music. That response was unlikely, since Westermann loved Terry’s music, calling his debut record Juarez (1975) “the finest, most honest and heartfelt piece of music I ever heard.”

          The Panhandle Mystery Band had only recently coalesced during those 1978 Lubbock sessions, Lloyd Maines’s first foray into production. Through 1979, they honed their sound and tightened their arrangements with a series of periodic performances beyond Allen’s regular art-world circuit, including memorable record release concerts in Lubbock, Chicago, L.A., and Kansas City. Terry sought to harness the high-octane power of this now well-oiled collective engine to overdrive his songs into rawer and rockier off-road territory.

          His first album to share top billing with the Panhandle Mystery Band, Dummy documents a ferocious new band in fully telepathic, tornado-fueled flight, refining its caliber, increasing its range, and never looking down. Alongside the stalwart Maines brothers co-producer, guitarist, and all-rounder Lloyd, bassist Kenny, and drummer Donnie and mainstay Richard Bowden (who here contributes not only fiddle but also mandolin, cello, and “truck noise theory,” the big-rig doppler effect of Lloyd’s steel on “Roll Truck Roll”), new addition Jesse Taylor supplies blistering lead guitar, on loan from Joe Ely (who plays harmonica here). Jesse’s kinetic blues lines and penchant for extreme volume were instrumental in pushing these recordings into brisker tempos and tougher attitudes. Terry was feverish for several studio days, suffering from a bad flu and sweating through his

          clothes, which partially explains the literally febrile edge to his performances, rendered largely in a perma-growl. (By this point, he was regularly breaking piano pedals with his heavy-booted stomp.) Like the album title itself, the songs on Smokin the Dummy ring various demented bells. The tracks rifle through Terry’s assorted

          Obsessions especially the potential energy and escape of the open road, elevated here to an ecstatic, prayerful pitch and are populated by a cast of crooked characters: truckers, truck-stop waitresses, convicts, cokeheads, speed freaks, greasers, holy rollers, rodeo riders, dancehall cheaters, and sacrificial prairie dogs, sinners seeking some small reprieve, any fugitive moment of grace.

          A reigning deity of a certain kind of country music since the mid-70s.
          – The New York Times.

          The kind of singular American artist who expresses the fundamental weirdness of his country. – The Wire.

          TRACK LISTING

          A1. The Heart Of California (for Lowell George)
          A2. Cocaine Cowboy
          A3. Whatever Happened To Jesus (and Maybeline)?
          A4. Helena Montana
          A5. Texas Tears
          B1. Cajun Roll
          B2. Feelin Easy
          B3. The Night Café
          B4. Roll Truck Roll
          B5. Red Bird
          B6. The Lubbock Tornado (I Don't Know)

          Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band

          Bloodlines

            On his manifold fourth album, acclaimed songwriter and visual artist Terry Allen contemplates kinship the ways sex and violence stitch and sever the ties of family, faith, and society with skewering satire and affection alike. Bloodlines compiles thematically related but disparate recordings from miscellaneous sources both theatrical and historical: two songs written for plays; two full-band reprises of selections from Juarez; the irreverent hellfire-hitchhiker-on-highway ballad “Gimme a Ride to Heaven Boy” (featuring Joe Ely); and the poignant eponymous ode to the arteries of ancestry and landscape (the debut recording of eight year-old Natalie Maines, later covered by Lucinda Williams).

            Since 1970, when they met in Allen’s studio in his hometown of Lubbock, Texas, one of songwriter and visual artist Terry Allen’s great foils and friends was the sometimes cantankerous but always brilliant art critic and writer Dave Hickey, with whom he sparred on topics musical, visual, and beyond (and to whom this reissue is dedicated in memoriam, in the wake of his passing in 2021.) Hickey, a fellow Texan paddling against the currents of the hermetic New York centric art world, was an accomplished songwriter in his own right, and

            he and Terry pushed each other to refine their respective practices. In 1983, the two were thick as thieves brothers in blood and Hickey’s wry but big-hearted presence haunts the history and periphery of Bloodlines, the album Terry released in June of that year.

            Hickey’s commercial doubts notwithstanding, critical recognition was not in short demand. In a 1984 review of Bloodlines, the L.A. Herald Examiner called Allen “one of the most compelling American songwriters working today … making the most unique art-pop of our time,” elsewhere comparing him not only to Moon Mullican and Jerry Lee Lewis, but also to the Velvet Underground and Philip Glass (probably the first time that unlikely quartet ever appeared together in one sentence). In 1983, against all odds, such sentiments were growing in underground prominence, as Allen’s records gained a fanatical word-of-mouth following they weren’t easy to find in those days.

            Recorded piecemeal at Caldwell Studios in Lubbock, in sessions spanning August 1982 through January 1983, Terry self-released it, like all his previous records, on his own Fate Records imprint. Despite his frustration with the protracted timeline and some anxiety about the correspondingly higher budget, the production on Bloodlines courtesy, once again, of master guitarist Lloyd Maines is slicker, cleaner, and more dynamic than prior efforts, and it reached a broader audience than ever before. UK label Making Waves reissued it in 1985, facilitating semi-reliable European distribution for the first time as well as a 1986 UK tour, on which the great BJ Cole filled in for Lloyd on pedal steel.

            No veteran country songwriter sounds more attuned to the national mood. His songs still feel like little guidebooks for staring down a harsh universe.
            – The Washington Post

            It has always been a fool’s errand to frame Allen in terms of other artists there was nobody like him before he showed up, and the subsequent 40 years have been equally light on plausible peers. – Uncut

            TRACK LISTING

            A1. Bloodlines (I)
            A2. Gimme A Ride To Heaven Boy
            A3. Cantina Carlotta
            A4. Ourland A5. Oh Hally Lou
            B1. Oh What A Dangerous Life
            B2. Manhattan Bluebird
            B3. There Oughta Be A Law Against Sunny Southern California
            B4. Bloodlines (II)

            Terry Edwards And The Scapegoats

            My Wife Doesn't Understand Me (RSD22 EDITION)

              THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2022 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

              Available on vinyl for the first time. A double LP, playing at 45rpm for superior sound quality. The accompanying download includes radio edits of live favourite 6-8-1 (The Burn-Up) and Blue Funk, plus Ructions (60s Stereo Mix) and Qualm-Free Zone. Black vinyl. Not numbered. Recalibrated artwork in Black/White/Silver. A collectors edition.

              Terry De Castro

              A View To A Kill (RSD21 EDITION)

                THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2021 EXCLUSIVE AND WILL BE AVAILABLE INSTORE ON SATURDAY JUNE 12TH ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

                IF THERE ARE ANY REMAINING COPIES THEY WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT 6PM ON THE SAME DAY (SATURDAY JUNE 12TH).


                Wedding Present bass player covering Duran Duran James Bnd theme and Wedding Present track

                Terry Hall

                Home

                  Let's talk about denial.Let's talk about self-awareness.Let's talk about romantic idealism.And let's talk about pop music.Let's talk about Terry Hall and his strange relationship with all of these things: about his ability to create life-affirming pop music and about the fact that his exceptional gift was recognised by a long line of his peers before, finally, Terry Hall could no longer ignore it either.Let's talk about the album where the penny finally dropped.A record which believes in the dream of perfect love despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.Let's talk about 'Home', the first solo album by Terry Hall. Twenty-six years have elapsed since the original release of 'Home', but this Record Store Day sees its long overdue debut on vinyl.It might have been the first album which saw Hall step forward from a group identity, but 'Home' was Hall's ninth in various guises since the emergence of The Specials' self-titled LP in 1979.It had taken Hall a while to find his feet as a songwriter.With Jerry Dammers so prolific in that regard, Hall found himself in a strange position at the end of that group's collective lifetime.The Specials had made him a pop star, but he didn't feel like one.By the release of Fun Boy Three's second album 'Missing' (1983), the competition was Wham!, Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet and Culture Club.Nothing wrong with any of those, but Hall would see himself staring back from the pages of a magazine alongside all the aforementioned names and experience what he called "a total cognitive disconnection". 'Home', then, was the culmination of a long process which saw Terry Hall separate his lack of love for the job of pop star from his adoration for pop itself.In solving that conundrum, it sounds like a weight has been lifted from Hall.Like a code has finally been cracked.Somehow emblematic of that process is the album's lead single 'Forever J', a song that Hall had started writing about his wife Jeannette almost a decade previously, but only finally came together when Hall presented it to the album's producer Ian Broudie (The Lightning Seeds) as the sessions got under way.Alloyed to a disarmingly beautiful chorus, this ticker-tape flurry of unguarded intimacies might just be the most perfect pop song of an era that wasn't exactly lacking in competition ñ and although it didn't crack the top 40 at the time, it cemented the affection in which an emerging generation of proficient popsmiths held him: Jarvis Cocker did his own remix of the song and Damon Albarn sang Hall's praises at every opportunity.In commencing the record, 'Forever J' sets the tone for what follows on the remainder of 'Home'.Yes, it's a solo album, but the engine of these performances is a stellar "house" band comprised of Craig Gannon (The Smiths, Aztec Camera, The Bluebells), Les Pattinson (Echo & The Bunnymen) and Chris Sharrock (The Icicle Works, The La's). This illustrious roll call is one that extends to the songwriters with whom Hall collaborated on the record.Co-written by Nick Heyward, 'What's Wrong With Joy' is a synergy of seeming incompatible components: its life-affirming power pop livery freighting a cargo of self-doubt ("I've got a bag full of promises I can't keep/And a hundred reasons why I don't sleep") and good intentions ("All I wanna do is make your dreams come true") to the affections of anyone who hears it.Andy Partridge steps forward to share the credit on 'Moon On Your Dress" and 'I Drew A Lemon': the latter a rebuke to the man who will never love her the way our lyrical protagonist pledges to; the former a longtime favourite among fans of both Hall and XTC for the sanguine self-deprecations that manage to captures something of both artists' relationship to the world around them. And, of course, if you have Ian Broudie manning the console, it would be obtuse not to write a song or two together.With a friendship dating back to the early days of The Specials (the young Broudie saw Hall's pre-Specials outfit The Coventry Automatics open for The Clash in 1978) the measure of the pair's chemistry stretches beyond Broudie's production role to encompass two of the album's indisputable highlights.Featuring the unforgettable couplet, "If ifs and ands were pots and pans, you'd be a kitchen", 'You' sees its protagonist trying to persuade his subject to see in him what he sees in her.The other Broudie co-write on 'Home' will need no introduction to most pop fans.'Sense' is the song which gave its name to The Lightning Seeds' second album, giving the group their third top 40 hit in 1992.The version sung here by Hall though benefits from the Sharrock's pugnacious Keith Moon-isms and, of course, the buccaneering fretboard work of Craig Gannon. It's Gannon, too, whose fingerprints can be found on a clutch of other songs which give a little more back with each repeated play.'Home' may have emerged in the era that saw the term 'Britpop' enter the cultural lexicon, but there's a fragrant melodic classicism at the heart of Gannon and Hall's collaborations that can also be found in the work of Hall's "other" 80s songwriting vehicle The Colour Field, with its nods to French chanson.It's there on 'Forever J' and it's also abundant on Hall/Gannon originals like 'No No No' and 'I Don't Got You'. And yet, for all of that, there's something about Hall's voice that is, to quote the latter song, "as English as the weather".You can hear it all over 'Home', and it works both to the advantage of this album and the listener.Like the expression of the man staring at you on the sleeve, there's an outward sense of reserve in these performances which belies the lyrical tensions hinted at in many of its songs.Hall's marriage was coming to an end when 'Home' was recorded, but these songs are manifestly the work of someone who still believes in happy ever after.Just about.They're also the work of someone who has come to an accommodation with his relationship to pop.To coin a neologism, you might say that this was the record where our hero finally learned to "own it".And if your love of great pop mirrors that of Terry Hall, 'Home' is a record you might also consider owning.

                  Terry Edwards

                  Stop Trying To Sell Me Back My Past

                    THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2020 RELEASE AVAILABLE ONLINE ONLY AS PART OF THE AUGUST 29TH DROP DAY AT 6PM.
                    LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.


                    Reissue of long deleted covers EPs (Mary Chain, The Fall, Miles Davis) plus the great lost EP of Cure covers which never got an official release on vinyl.Also includes the punk rock trilogy of Damned, Pistols and Clash covers.Part of the 2020 Diamond Edition of releases and concerts celebrating Terry Edwards' 60th birthday.

                    Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band

                    Just Like Moby Dick

                      Iconic and iconoclastic Texan songwriter and visual artist Terry Allen’s heartbreaking, hilarious new album, his first set of new songs since 2013’s Bottom of the World, features the full Panhandle Mystery Band, including co-producer Charlie Sexton (Dylan, Bowie, Blaze), Shannon McNally, and Jo Harvey Allen; mainstays Bukka Allen, Richard Bowden, and Lloyd Maines; and co-writes with Joe Ely and Dave Alvin. The connections to Melville’s masterpiece are metaphorical and allusive, as elusive as the White Whale. The masterly spiritual successor to Lubbock (on everything), Just Like Moby Dick casts its net wide for wild stories, depicting, among other monstrous things, Houdini in existential crisis, the death of the last stripper in town, bloodthirsty pirates (in a pseudo-sequel to Brecht and Weill’s “Pirate Jenny”), the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (in the “American Childhood” suite), a vampire-infested circus, mudslides and burning mobile homes, and all manner of tragicomic disasters, abandonments, betrayals, bad memories, failures, and fare-thee-wells.

                      Just Like Moby Dick, his first set of new songs since 2013’s Bottom of the World, takes its title from the archetypal monster of American literature and the American imaginary. (Coincidentally—or not—his label Paradise of Bachelors also takes its name from a Herman Melville story.) “Memory shot her crystals as the clear ice most forms of noiseless twilights,” Melville writes, and for most of the novel, Moby Dick himself remains hidden, haunting Ahab as a crystalline monster of fathomless memory, a terrible fever dream from the depths. The whale remains a specter on Allen’s record too, appearing explicitly only in the briny final line of the last song “Sailin’ On Through,” and on the artist’s Side D vinyl etching and CD insert drawings, where he lurks menacingly beneath the roiling seas of Thomas Chambers, the 19th-century maritime painter whose floridly freaky nautical scenes adorn the album jacket.

                      RIYL: David Byrne, Guy Clark, Bob Dylan, John Prine, Silver Jews, Sturgill Simpson, Townes Van Zandt.

                      TRACK LISTING

                      A1. Houdini Didn't Like The Spiritualists
                      A2. Abandonitis
                      A3. Death Of The Last Stripper
                      A4. All That's Left Is Fare-Thee-Well
                      B1. Pirate Jenny
                      B2. American Childhood I: Civil Defense
                      B3. American Childhood II: Bad Kiss
                      B4. American Childhood III: Little Puppet Thing
                      C1. All These Blues Go Walkin' By
                      C2. City Of The Vampires
                      C3. Harmony Two
                      C4. Sailin' On Through

                      I’m going to set Carpe Diem as my alarm for the next week and see how that makes me feel. It will be replacing an alternation of Werewolves of London and Baby, It’s You. After a week the familiarity might feel kind of insane but kind of nice. Ad nauseum to the coffee. Yeah! Terry is into repetition. Terry often feels like the daily grind but set inside a Loony Tune. They can be slightly nasty and violent, but funny at the same time. I laugh at Terry riffs a lot. The lyrics are droll, yes, but have you heard the riffs? It’s like they’re tickling you. It’s like Terry has got his great big fingers under my arms. But this is all part of a strangely conceived plan. I would almost say that Terry is highly conceptual. Possibly the most conceptual band I’ve been around, possibly in my whole life. Like… what’s really going on here? Why am I listening to jingles and feeling so moved?

                      My favourite songs on Terry’s new album ‘I’m Terry’ (the band’s third record in three years), are Under Reign, it’s a creepy one, sandwiched between other new faves The Whip and Crimes. There’s a theme of dominance and submission here, but kinda unremarkable and ignorable, like knowing you're enslaved by your streaming service but just gently putting that out of your mind for another week. Terry is domesticity. Terry romances the mundane. This is how romance ekes out a triumph amidst mundanity. That’s what Billy Bragg’s New England and Squeeze’s Up The Junction do. Terry’s suburban escapism moment is Ciao Goodbye. Listen to Ciao Goodbye on an arterial road under the yellow streetlights of a weeknight. Terry has never been this beautiful. Terry may never be beautiful again, definitely not on this record. The next song is psycho.

                      That’s what I like about Terry, there are few rules in Terry’s world. They seem to make a song out of whatever sounds good to them. I literally don’t know what they’ll do next. They aren’t a genre study. The only stylistic consistency is in their hat wear. I’ve never been in a band like this. I’ve been in a band that simultaneously studied genre and also hats. But never only hats. Have you noticed the reggae undercurrent in Terry? There is one. This is good. Terry are kinda like Steely Dan or 10cc. Both bands make me queasy after a certain point. Terry probably also make me a bit queasy, singing about police beatings and nationalism and all that. But they’re not out to hurt you. They’re like the kindly bearer of bad news. There’s some awful shit going on in this country. Terry knows. Terry puts it in terms that speak to me. It’s a tragicomedy. I want to laugh and sometimes I want to consider crying. But I don’t think I will. I’m pretty certain Terry isn’t perverse, they’re just the harbinger of the encroaching perverse world. I’m pretty certain Terry wants to be my friend, and your friend. Our friend, Terry. Lee Parker, 2018. 


                      STAFF COMMENTS

                      Barry says: With the recent reissue of the Moldy Peaches' eponymous lo-fi indie opus, they've reignited a previously roaring fire for clanging guitars and crashing drums, and it just so happens that Terry are the 'If They Could Play Their Instruments' version of the aforementioned. A similar whimsical sensibility, but underpinned with the tuneful twists and turns of a band know what makes a perfect progression. Brilliantly balanced and delivered.

                      TRACK LISTING

                      01. Carpe Diem
                      02. Bureau
                      03. The Whip
                      04. Under Reign
                      05. Crimes
                      06. Oh Helen
                      07. Jane Roe
                      08. Fortress
                      09. Ciao Goodbye
                      10. For The Field

                      Terry

                      8 Girls

                        Terry's second seven inch with three new songs exploring themes of patriarchy in politics, mass consumption versus lifestyle choices and the dating scene.

                        '8 Girls' is a pop nugget that references female politicians including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop, controversial leader of the One Nation party Pauline Hanson and Senators Penny Wong and Jacqui Lambie, who on the cover looks to be dressed as a sumo wrestler.

                        Divide Terry into four and you get Al Montfort (UV Race, Total Control, Dick Diver), Amy Hill (Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band) and Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell Street Bombings).

                        Originally released on a short run by Aarght records in Australia, this version on transparent vinyl housed in a reverse board sleeve, limited to 400 copies!


                        TERRY

                        Remember Terry

                          Terry is a latent man of mystery. Terry is also a band from Melbourne, Australia. Divide him in half and you split the genders, into quarters and you get Amy Hill (also of Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band, Primo), Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell St Bombings) and Al Montfort (UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control). Guitars, bass, drums, all four sing. Terry are busy people and Terry is a particularly active project too, having released two EPs and a full length album (‘Terry HQ’) last year on Upset The Rhythm.

                          After returning from summer 2016’s European tour, Terry set about writing a new album of songs. These are now grouped together as ‘Remember Terry’, an album full of wish fulfilment, critiqued characters, memorial muscle and historical hustle.’Start The Tape’ is a not quite two-minute careen through what Terry are best known for; gang vocals, chased-down melodies and acerbic commentary. “The Boys in Blue are no nonsense, but no nonsense just won’t hold up” they assert throughout the song, amid unbridled drum rolls and keyboard sirens.

                          Terry draw on their everyday realities to make personal conclusions; “I can’t live here, I can’t leave here” they collectively sing through the strummed guitars and skittling synths of ‘Heavin Heavies’. Somehow the serious nature of the themes handled in their songs are only further emphasised by the tuneful, arguably ‘sing-along’ treatment Terry usually employ. ‘Give Up The Crown’, ‘The Colonel’ and ‘Gun’ are other prime examples of this, packed full of assembled vocal harmonies, contagious riffs and rhetoric.

                          With tracks like ’Glory’ and ‘Homage’, Terry allow us for the first time to see a more laid-back side of his personality. Supplemented with fluorescing synth lines and adopting an unhurried pace, both songs lull you into a false sense of pleasantry, only to pack a greater punch when lyrics like “Off his bloody head goes” or “No head, no choice, no land, no time, no crime, no good” surface. ‘Take Me To The City’ is a similarly evocative stroll through the “bright night city lights”, with Amy and Xanthe listing their nightlife observations over languorous guitar lines and programmed drums. Their “all they talk about..” refrain drifts off effortlessly into dazed disclosures. Terry prefer to make a profound point in a quiet way, hectoring bypassed for self-revelation. The truth is in there, just skating below the surface of their glammy, country-stepping punk/pop odysseys, we only have to listen carefully.

                          ‘Remember Terry’ is a fitting follow-up to last year’s celebrated debut album. Ideas are pursued and new ground explored. Throughout this expansion of sound and subject-matter though, Terry remain committed to telling it straight, reporting from the frontline of the political made personal. ’Remember Terry ‘ was recorded by Terry at Grace Lane and Terry HQ through the first few months of 2017. Digitised by Nick Kuceli. Mixed and Mastered by Mikey Young.


                          TRACK LISTING

                          01. Rio
                          02. Start The Tape
                          03. Take Me To The City
                          04. Risk
                          05. Give Up The Crown
                          06. Heavin’ Heavies
                          07. Glory
                          08. Gun
                          09. The Colonel
                          10. Homage

                          Steve Reich / Terry Riley

                          Six Pianos / Keyboard Study #1

                            Played by: Gregor Schwellenbach /Hauscka/ Daniel Brauer / Paul Frick / Erol Sarp / Lukas Vogel (Grandbrothers) John Kameel Farah.

                            After the widely noticed performance at the „Acht Brücken Festival 2016” at Cologne's Philharmonic Hall, Gregor Schwellenbach, Hauschka, Erol Sarp (of „Grandbrothers“), Daniel Brandt, Paul Frick (both of „Brandt Brauer Frick“) and John Kameel Farah will be releasing their interpretation of Steve Reich’s „Six Pianos” as a studio recording via FILM. The re-recording of this piece is an interpretation of Reich’s composition but still far more than just that – it is a modern approach to his idea behind it.

                            The basic idea came up at the beginning of the 70s at „The Baldwin Piano & Organ Company“ in New York. During a rehearsal phase Steve Reich spent in this very piano store, the idea emerged of writing a composition for all the grand pianos available to him at the company. By the time of the finished piece, the actual number of pianos had settled down to six, whereof „Six Pianos” developed in 1973.

                            On the occasion of his 80th birthday, the six pianists declare their love to Steve Reich and his composition with this release. Shaped by electronic club music as well as their classical education, they form „Six Pianos” in dignified modernity and top it off with today’s sound esthetics and technical recording possibilities.

                            What you will be hearing is not the recording from the „Kölner Philharmonie” (Cologne Philharmonics) but the ensemble play of six different grand pianos in six different locations, throughout Germany. Each pianist performed his part on his piano using his typical studio equipment and passed the recording over to the next one. Thus the six characteristic and individual timbres of the performers overlay to create the overall picture – „Six Pianos” the way it should be looked at in 2016.

                            „Pianists are soloists and lone warriors by nature”, as Gregor Schwellenbach once said. But the initiator not only won over solo artists to the greatest possible extent such as Hauschka or John Kameel Farah but also musicians from „Brandt Brauer Frick“ and „Grandbrothers“ as well as their ensemble partners: Jan Brauer mixed „Six Pianos” in the studio while Lukas Vogel provided delays for the b-side.

                            „Keyboard Study #1“ by Terry Riley is a worthy b-side opposed to Reich’s composition. The piece is kind of a building set of ever lengthening, repetitive patterns played against each other with the right and left hand displaced. The composition proposes various possible combinations for the performer to choose from and repeat at will. And what the performers have chosen proves Gregor Schwellenbach’s assumption: „Especially Terry Riley’s and Steve Reich’s music are open doors for pianists socialized by pop music and their audience.”


                            Terry Malts’ third album ‘Lost At The Party’ is a long time coming, 3 years to be precise. But the time was spent well. Between stints of touring and local shows, Bassist/ vocalist Phil Benson and guitarist/vocalist Corey Cunningham wrote and re-wrote songs over the course of a year in Los Angeles where Cunningham had moved since the release of their last album, 2013’s Nobody Realizes This Is Nowhere.

                            The idea was to broaden the Terry Malts concept and create a kaleidoscopic pop album that has a mixture of moods, each song turning to a different sound inspired by the records the band have loved over the years. The driving punk (Buzzcocks, The Undertones) that has been a cornerstone of the group’s sound sits snugly with songs steeped in indie-pop and power-pop (The Chills, Dwight Twilley). Once the band was ready to record they enlisted Monte Vallier (Soft Moon, Weekend, Swell) to co-produce at his Ruminator Audio studio in San Francisco.

                            It is the group’s first album recorded in a studio. 2012’s Killing Time & "Nobody Realizes This Is Nowhere" were both recorded in various practice spaces by guitarist Corey Cunningham and the group was intent on shaking the lo- fi tag. The freedom of the studio allowed the band to expand on their sound with the addition of 12-string electric guitars, piano, organ, and sound effects. From driving opener “Used To Be” through jangling ballad “Gentle Eyes” to first single “Seen Everything” and haunting closer “When The Nighttime Comes,” Terry Malts have put the augmented sonic palette in the service of some of their strongest tunes yet. The resulting album, Lost At The Party is a lovingly-crafted love letter to pop music in all it’s forms.

                            TRACK LISTING

                            Used To Be
                            Won’t Come To Find You
                            Gentle Eyes
                            Your Turn
                            It’s Not Me
                            Waiting For The Bomb
                            Seen Everything
                            And Suddenly
                            Come Back
                            Playtime
                            When The Nighttime Comes

                            Love is a highway, but you’re not likely to find Terry there anymore. He’s on the train. Terry saw the light, and he put on his sunhat. Ring Ring…‘If you're carsick, get outta the car!’
                            There’s only room for one big pug in this doggy daycare. Terry’s taken to the night. Thank you nurse, I'll see myself out.

                            LOOK! There he is, peeping through the cracks in your screen. Nuanced. Mercurial. Free.Blowing you a kiss. Marcel Marceau, Shmarshel Shmarsheau! But Terry…. How unforgettable.

                            What will you do when the cloud gives way? When the map leads you to a pile of potatoes? We wuz wrong. Hit me with your algorithm stick!

                            Siri, is death an illusion? Siri, am I locked in a prison of my own making? Don’t pull that thread kiddo.Siri’s gone. Talk about truth! But when you're ready for real answers…Talk about TERRY.


                            Terry

                            Talk About Terry

                              The new band from Al Monte from Total Control, UV Race, Dick Diver etc.

                              Second Pressing on CLEAR VINYL, 300 only... 

                              Terry is getting ready, combing his hair, buttoning his jacket, turning the key in the door. “I’m doing fine” sings Terry out loud, he knows. Divide him into four and you get Al Montfort (UV Race, Total Control, Dick Diver etc.), Amy Hill (Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band) and Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell Street Bombings).

                              Inevitably, Terry likes to make a noise. Drums, guitars and all his voices come into play, making a solid raft for Terry’s melancholic musings to navigate the languid rapids. This all unravels at its own pace, conducting a conversation with the commonplace. ‘Talk About Terry’ marks the band’s first venture into the recorded domain collecting together three of the greatest misshapen glam pop tunes Melbourne, Australia has to offer. Let’s sit up at the table. Let’s start the dialogue now, as Terry is well on his way.




                              ‘Terry Malts use a time honoured pop formula, but rarely has a new band crammed such sheer excitement’ Louder Than War

                              Follow up to 2012 debut Killing Time, Nobody Realizes This is Nowhere a punchy record packed with buzzsaw guitars and surprisingly catchy melodies. Recorded by the band and mixed with long-time associated Monte Vallier (Weekend, Wax Idols, Soft Moon).

                              Reminiscent of forbears such as The Undertones, Buzzcocks and Descendants, packed with upbeat tunes but don’t let that fool you; the lyrics from bassist/vocalist Phil Benson are smart but very, very dark. Guitarist Corey Cunningham just plain shreds, piling on layered attacks of buzz, howl and scree. Holding down the bottom is the rock steady drumming of Nathan Sweatt.

                              From ripping opener to ‘Two Faces’ through alienated first single ‘I Was Not There’ right down to closer ‘So Serious’, Nobody Realizes This is Nowhere is a bold step for Terry Malts and one of the great punk records of 2013.

                              TRACK LISTING

                              1. Two Faces
                              2. Human Race
                              3. Life’s Not A Dream
                              4. I Was Not There
                              5. They’re Feeding
                              6. Buy Buy Baby
                              7. No Tomorrow
                              8. Walking With You
                              9. Well Adjusted
                              10. Comfortably Dumb
                              11. So Serious

                              After careful, weeklong consideration, San Francisco trio Terry Malts went forth to record a debut LP as per the request of Slumberland Records. Displaying a slick, intelligent take on modern chainsaw pop, Killing Time certainly lives up to its name! Who are Terry Malts? A Yellow Pages private dick has gleaned the following: Corey Cunningham (guitar, backing vox), of Dickson, Tennessee-by-way-of-a-cardboard-box-in-Toronto, was asked to housesit in Fresno, CA. Duties fulfilled, he shot north on a graffiti trip to 924 Gilman Street and immediately bonded with fellow men's room "artists" Phil Benson (bass guitar, lead vox) and the unfortunately named Nathan Sweatt (drums, backing vox). Hands shook, vibes exchanged; the trio felt compelled to distill their energy into a unified voice.

                              The Terrys' gospel is succinct, direct, sincere and timed expertly with next year's looming apocalypse: life is hopeless, enjoy! With a live reputation that bleeds funky "punk" attitude, the trio crammed this urgency into the Terry Malts studio edition. Recorded by a machine, then expertly mixed by human being Monte Vallier (Swell, Half Church), Killing Time may compel you to type the following buzzwords into your blog (which, I love, by the way!): catchy, husky, hunky, sharp, blue-collar, rocking, hockey-rock, working-class, perfect, near-perfect, nothalf- bad, and / or not-bad. It's an album, it's a lifestyle, it's a 34-minute hour of pure, unadulterated Malts... all right?


                              Terry Riley

                              In C

                                A new remastered edition of the wonderful ambient and experimental work by composer Terry Riley, 'In C'. One of the great modern musical works, Riley composed this influential piece in 1964, performing it for the first time in San Francisco later that year with an ensemble that included fellow innovator Steve Reich within its ranks.

                                'In C' was first released on record in 1968, the result of a recording session with musicians from the Centre of Creative and Performing Arts at Buffalo University, New York. Upon its release, the album caused a sensation in the world of modern music and is now regarded as a major triumph of 20th Century composition.

                                The work inspired composers such as Philip Glass and influenced rock musicians such as Pete Townshend of The Who and Pink Floyd.

                                This Esoteric Recordings reissue is remastered, fully restores all original album artwork and features a new essay.

                                San Francisco's Terry Malts follow up their smash 'I'm Neurotic' single with another blazing three-song EP. Their ecstatic live shows and immaculate power pop songwriting have transformed this irreverent punk trio into one of the most talked about SF bands in ages. Mashing up the best bits from stellar forebears like The Undertones, Buzzcocks and Descendents, Terry Malts haven't forgotten that one of the key elements of punk has always been fun. All three songs on 'Something About You' are full of fuzzy / crunchy riffs, galloping drums and sing-along vocal hooks. The title tune speeds by at a brisk clip, full of "ooh ooh" backing vocals and classic SoCal punk vibes. "No Sir, I'm Not a Christian" might be the catchiest statement of atheism one will ever hear. "Fun Night" is a current live favorite, always sure to get the kids in the crowd jumping around; fast and furious, its feedback-laden guitars are the exclamation at the end of the excellent single. Another future classic from Terry Malts!


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