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OK:KO

While My Sequencer Gently Bleeps

OK

    Stefan Schwander of course is a man of many names and visions (such as Harmonious Thelonious, Repeat Orchestra and A Rocket in Dub) and here's his latest one: While My Sequencer Gently Bleeps comes up with "OK" on new Hamburg-based label Unsure. As While My Sequencer Gently Bleeps Schwander strips down his equipment even further and refines his longstanding idea of creating reduced minimalistic tracks radiating warmth, digging deep and delivering the groove.

    The five tracks on "OK" all follow one basic flow: big basslines, elegant chords and transparent arrangements, rhythms as compelling as unobtrusive. Schwanders love for dub shimmers through the tracks, just as his pop-trained flair for seductive harmonies.
    Beautiful groovy music from Düsseldorf to the world. On and on and on.

    TRACK LISTING

    A1 Amber
    A2 Emptiness

    B1 Felt
    B2 Hesitation 
    B3 Burton 

    Kiefer

    It's OK, B U

      Kiefer’s new album sees the LA based artist return to his roots, playing keys and making beats.

      ‘It’s Ok, B U’ combines the hallmarks of Kiefer’s sound - masterful piano playing, mesmeric beats and vibrant melodies - with serious emotional heft.

      In addition to being a celebrated solo artist, Kiefer is a Grammy-winning producer who has worked with the likes of Drake and Anderson .Paak.

      TRACK LISTING

      I Could Cry
      Panic
      My Disorder
      Dreamer
      High
      Falling
      I Wish I Wasn’t Me
      Head Trip Feat. Luke Titus
      Hips
      Doomed
      August Again
      I Was Foolish, I Guess
      Glowing Feat. Pera Krstajic
      Forgetting U
      It’s Ok, B U
      I Mean That

      Helsinki quartet OK:KO releases their third album "Liesu" with We Jazz Records on 15 April. The band, led by drummer/composer Okko Saastamoinen and including saxophonist Jarno Tikka, pianist Toomas Keski-Säntti and bassist Mikael Saastamoinen (of Superpostion & Linda Fredriksson "Juniper") is a scene favourite in Finland and has recently garnered some international attention with their melodic, dynamic and original approach. The OK:KO sound is adventurous yet accessible, and contemporary yet rooted in the lineage of acoustic small group jazz.

      When listening to OK:KO, you can feel that their influences also come from out of the musical realm. After all, isn't this just how it should be? Making music from your own life. Here, you can tell that the landscape of rural Finland, its poetic, at times even melancholy beauty, is ever present. It's folk song country. But don't be fooled, these guys form a real flesh and blood jazz band. That means that the music just starts when the first note hits, and onwards from there, we're in for a wild ride.

      Whether punchy like on "Anima", solemn like on "Arvo", or just trekking out there a skiing lane of their own like on "Vanhatie", what you'll get is pure OK:KO. Melodic, interactive, honest and forward-reaching contemporary jazz music. That is something we appreciate – a lot!

      Vinyl editions available on opaque white / black vinyl, with inside-out 3mm spine sleeve and a polylined black inner sleeve.

      TRACK LISTING

      1. Anima
      2. Rieju
      3. Kirkkis
      4. Arvo
      5. Vanhatie
      6. Yösalmi

      Wuso

      You'll Be Ok, I Promise

        The ever-super Pure Life Tapes bring us another (two) slabs of future-facing dystopic 'tronica from Martin-Schultz aka wuso 命.

        We kick things off with the thundering bass and cinematic throng of 'Lost In Translation', deftly moving from tense crescentic synth pulls to bursts of neon activity, slipping into 80's synth territory with snappy sidechaines and gated reverbs, nicely ofset by the more introspective twinkling ambience of follower, 'Trapped In The Future'. It's both 'Trapped...' and follower 'The Digital Mine' that really show the depth of expression that can be wrought from relatively unadorned synthesis, with pulses of delay and filter sweeps being the mainstay of both pieces, eventually culminating in a militaristic procession of driving saw stabs and woozy lead lines. 

        Closing out the a-side, the duo of 'Too Late To Care' and 'A New Found Loss' swim with crystalline echoes, speeding up and slowing down the delays resulting in a chaotic but enchanting soundtrack redux, with the latter especially diving deep into filmic industrial electronics. 

        We begin the B-Side with the shadowy 'Flawed Desire', both eerily gothic and enduringly mechanised, it takes the established sound and further tears it apart into its constituent parts, resulting in an almost diametrically opposed juxtaposition of spine-tingling modern classical ambience and bolschy rave. 

        It's the closing tracks that really seal the concept, pulling together the disparate sounds into a rounded and evocative whole. 'Drifting' is probably as heavy as the collection gets, both pummelingly heavy and atmospherically dense. The closing trio skilfully offset the moments of light with intimidating unease, glimmers of light piercing the fog of electronic malaise. 
         

        STAFF COMMENTS

        Barry says: Another absolutely stunning package from super-label Pure Life. The music itself as is evocative as the packaging is beautiful, perfectly conceived and impeccably produced, this is an essential purchase for any of you who like a bit of soundtrack synth (if not, why not?)

        TRACK LISTING

        1. Lost In Translation 03:48
        2. Trapped In The Future 04:14
        3. The Digital Mine 03:48
        4. Too Late To Care 03:03
        5. A New Found Loss 05:58
        6. Flawed Desire 05:25
        7. Drifting 04:11
        8. Something About... 03:35
        9. Try 04:01
        10. You'll Be Okay, I Promise 05:26

        Drive-By Truckers

        The New OK

          Originally conceived as a quarantine EP collecting material recorded in Memphis during sessions for ‘The Unraveling’, the project quickly grew to include provocative new songs written and recorded over what Drive-By Truckers co-founder Patterson Hood calls “this endless summer of protests, riots, political shenanigans and pandemic horrors.”

          Tracks such as Hood’s ‘Watching The Orange Clouds’ - inspired by the protests which followed George Floyd’s murder by Minneapolis police - and a fiery cover of The Ramones’ classic ‘The KKK Took My Baby Away’ (vocals by bassist Matt Patton) were exchanged between Hood, cofounding singer / songwriter / guitarist Mike Cooley, bassist Patton, keyboardist / multiinstrumentalist Jay Gonzalez and drummer Brad Morgan and then mixed by long-time Drive-By Truckers producer David Barbe.

          TRACK LISTING

          The New OK
          Tough To Let Go
          The Unraveling
          The Perilous Night
          Sarah’s Flame
          Sea Island Lonely
          The Distance
          Watching The Orange
          Clouds
          The KKK Took My Baby Away

          Honey Hahs

          OK

            The Honey Hahs are three sisters from South London somewhere between Nunhead and Peckham. Their average age is 11 and a ½ years old. Rowan plays guitar and piano, Robin plays bass and Sylvie plays drum. They all sing and harmonise.

            Radiohead

            OK Computer - OKNOTOK 1997-2017

              Rescued from defunct formats, prised from dark cupboards and brought to light after two decades in cold storage… OKNOTOK will be issued on June 23rd through XL Recordings, coinciding (roughly) with the original 1997 release date(s) of Radiohead’s landmark third album OK COMPUTER.

              OKNOTOK features the original OK COMPUTER twelve track album, eight B-sides, and the Radiohead completist’s dream: “I Promise,” “Lift,” and “Man Of War.” The original studio recordings of these three previously unreleased and long sought after OK COMPUTER era tracks finally receive their first official issue on OKNOTOK.

              All material on OKNOTOK is newly remastered from the original analogue tapes.

              STAFF COMMENTS

              Barry says: I can't think of anyone that wasn't floored by Radiohead's transformation from grungy gloom mongers to the indie/electronic greats they have become today, and this was the turning point. Liberally spread with their trademark morosity but with an unheard technical ability, ‘OK Computer’ was a stinging criticism of modernity delivered via a new sonic language. Now, twenty years after its landmark release, the band revisits this masterpiece with the definitive version. Alongside the original twelve track LP we’re treated to eight B-sides and a trio of previously unreleased tracks from the same era. This isn’t just an LP, it’s a historical document.

              Radiohead

              OK Computer

                THE PICCADILLY RECORDS ALBUM OF THE YEAR 1997

                This is the album that started to show their real potential and their first use of electronics (which mix beautifully with their older rawer rock style). The album that pushed them to the very top.

                STAFF COMMENTS

                Martin says: There can be few greater endorsements for anything than winning over a convinced sceptic. I started off from the premise that I didn't like this corporate indie sellout, but that, I am happy to say, proved an utterly impossible position to maintain after I actually heard it. Every last track is an utterly mesmerizing glimpse into blighted existence; a beautifully rendered, multilayered kaleidoscope of angst. 'Classic' is an overused word, but this is precisely the kind of idea it was coined for.

                TRACK LISTING

                1. Airbag
                2. Paranoid Android
                3. Subterranean Homesick Alien
                4. Exit Music (For A Film)
                5. Let Down
                6. Karma Police
                7. Fitter Happier
                8. Electioneering
                9. Climbing Up The Walls
                10. No Surprises
                11. Lucky
                12. The Tourist


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