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PYE CORNER AUDIO

In the beginning, there was just a box of tapes and “Fate’s Gentle Hand”

It was the autumn of 2010, and an anonymous figure known only as the Head Technician, an employee of Pye Corner Audio Transcription Services ('Magnetically aligning ferrous particles since 1970'), found himself at an auction in the village of Coldred, pop. 110. He was on the hunt for tobacco pipes when he chanced across a trio of boxes listed in the auction catalog, which described their contents only as 'archived magnetic recordings'. The sole bidder, he won the lot, and upon receipt of his purchase took possession of an unspecified number of mouldering cassettes and ¼" reel-to-reel tapes. The collection contained no identifying information save for a single phrase scrawled on each box: “Black Mill Sessions”. And so, armed with razors, eyedroppers, and a bevy of solid-state circuitry, the Head Technician sat down at his machines and got to work.

Whether anyone believed it or not, this was the framing device surrounding Pye Corner Audio’s "Black Mill Tapes Volume I: Avant Shards", which took the mysterious tactics of artists like Boards of Canada and Burial and raised them exponentially. Much like the narrator of a 19th century novel, the anonymous Head Technician purported merely to be the messenger of secondhand sounds. These were not compositions, we were told; they were tape transfers - 'transcriptions' of an unknown author, slathered in electronic voodoo, black majik circuit bends and hinting at that cult-philosophical stance that perhaps the Ancient Egyptians were much more civilized than we initially thought - perhaps harnessing electricity from thin air and colluding with extra-dimensional beings some 10,000 years ago... who knows? but the music contained here is like some embryonically DNA-strand that could well have existed in our (artificial)intelligence since our evolution began. 


STAFF COMMENTS

says: The final (!!!) part of PCA's "Black Mill" series. DO NOT SLEEP cultists! Pye Corner Audio is one of the head sorcerers of electro-voodoo and this concluding part of his epic opus cannot be missed!

TRACK LISTING

A1. Became Self Aware
A2. Exhumed
A3. Electronic Rhythm Number Thirteen
A4. Theme Number Five
B1. Return To Synth Mountain
B2. Arlonica
B3. Theme Sixty Eight

You know us Piccadilly cats are gonna keep it ALFOS 4 LYFE, and this record right here is a total doozy, straddling the ol' Indie-Dance divide like an ad-hoc bridge built out of Bez, copies of Screamadelica and Pollock-patterned bucket hats. For you see, the hazy, Roses-esque jangle of Andy Bell’s debut solo album "The View From Halfway Down" has been radically reworked by synth-wielding maverick Pye Corner Audio. 
The resulting EP offers squirming acid lines, thunderous 4/4, baggy breaks and hallucinogenic dreamscapes, all topped by the shifting shimmer of Andy's mystic vocals, themselves twisted into a whole new language. If that weren't enough to have you reaching for the glow sticks, Andy's also added an edit in his GLOK alias.

STAFF COMMENTS

says: Spectacularly psychedelic dancefloor tackle here as PCA unspools Andy Bell atop a plethora of spangled synthery. Indie Dance in its most essential form and totally recommended for the ALFOS / Baggy brigade. File next to Beyond The Wizard's Sleeve, Weatherall and Unkle.

TRACK LISTING

1. Indica (Pye Corner Audio Remix)
2. Skywalker (Pye Corner Audio Remix)
3. Cherry Cola (Pye Corner Audio Remix)
4. Love Comes In Waves (Pye Corner Audio Remix)
5. I Was Alone (Pye Corner Audio Remix)
6. Indica (Pye Corner Audio Remix – GLOK Re-edit)

Pye Corner Audio

Black Mill Tapes (10th Anniversary Box Set)

    In the beginning, there was just a box of tapes and “Fate’s Gentle Hand.”

    It was the autumn of 2010, and an anonymous figure known only as the Head Technician, an employee of Pye Corner Audio Transcription Services (“Magnetically aligning ferrous particles since 1970”), found himself at an auction in the village of Coldred, pop. 110. He was on the hunt for tobacco pipes when he chanced across a trio of boxes listed in the auction catalog, which described their contents only as “archived magnetic recordings.” The sole bidder, he won the lot, and upon receipt of his purchase took possession of an unspecified number of mouldering cassettes and ¼" reel-to-reel tapes. The collection contained no identifying information save for a single phrase scrawled on each box: “Black Mill Sessions.” And so, armed with razors, eyedroppers, and a bevy of solid-state circuitry, the Head Technician sat down at his machines and got to work.

    Whether anyone believed it or not, this was the framing device surrounding Pye Corner Audio’s Black Mill Tapes Volume I: Avant Shards, which took the mysterious tactics of artists like Boards of Canada and Burial and raised them exponentially. Much like the narrator of a 19th century novel, the anonymous Head Technician purported merely to be the messenger of secondhand sounds. These were not compositions, we were told; they were tape transfers—“transcriptions” of an unknown author, slathered with hiss and thick with ambiguity. “Some of the tapes displayed an unusual amount of degradation and …an unsettling amount of background noise, whether electrical in nature, or otherwise,” wrote the Head Technician. “I chose to edit around the worst of the unusual break-ups, but some still remain.”

    It was a good yarn, and the music was better still. Like his contemporaries Demdike Stare and Ghost Box, Pye Corner Audio seemed to be tapping into some hidden energy current, channeling spirits via electrical means. The pioneering transmissions of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop could be detected lurking within the music’s staticky swirl; so could the ominous throb of John Carpenter’s film soundtracks. Drones and flutes commingled with chugging machine beats; miasmic clouds of haunted tone alternated with death disco. It all sounded eerie, otherworldly, possibly occult—yet also, in tracks like the glimmering “We Have Visitors,” accented with a hint of mischief.

    Over the next few years, Martin Jenkins—for that, after all, was the Head Technician’s name—would go on to release three more volumes of Black Mills Tapes. Among the dozens of releases he has put out since 2010, they remain among the most beloved in his catalog. Those original, digital-only releases—a rarity when they came out—reappeared on cassette, courtesy Seattle’s Further Records, in 2012; in 2012 and 2014, the now-defunct Type label would anthologize all four volumes. Now, 10 years after Avant Shards first appeared, Lapsus collects all four volumes —now remastered— along with a fifth disc of unreleased material and a limited booklet. The musical landscape has changed considerably in the past decade, but what is remarkable about the Black Mills Tapes material is that it hasn’t aged a day; its retro-futurist transmissions sound just as mysteriously compelling as they did the first time around. While they purport to faithfully transcribe the sound of yesterday’s technology, they end up being something more: a record of what we wish the past sounded like—a rickety tape transfer of desire itself, spooled and boxed, just awaiting discovery. 

    TRACK LISTING

    Disc 1 - Black Mill Tapes Volume 1: Avant Shards
    Disc 2 - Black Mill Tapes Volume 2: Do You Synthesize?
    Disc 3 - Black Mill Tapes Volume 3: All Pathways Open
    Disc 4 - Black Mill Tapes Volume 4: Dystopian Vectors
    Disc 5 - Black Mill Tapes Volume 1: The Lost Tapes

    Full Tracklisting

    1. Volume 1 - Transmission One: Lonesome Vale 01:50
    2. Volume 1 - We Have Visitors 03:50
    3. Volume 1 - Folk Festival 01:06
    4. Volume 1 - Electronic Rhythm Number Three 05:00
    5. Volume 1 - A Dark Door 02:21
    6. Volume 1 - Theme Number Four 02:06
    7. Volume 1 - Electronic Rhythm Number Eight 05:06
    8. Volume 1 - Building Twelve, Room One 01:29
    9. Volume 1 - Theme Number Nine 02:34
    10. Volume 1 - Transmission Three: Briar Lane 01:53
    11. Volume 1 - Gathering 03:35

    12. Volume 2 - Mirror Sequence 02:45
    13. Volume 2 - Electronic Rhythm Number Seven 03:41
    14. Volume 2 - Transmission Four: Crooked Hill 04:21
    15. Volume 2 - Electronic Rhythm Number Four 03:50
    16. Volume 2 - Through The King's Wood 02:10
    17. Volume 2 - Recrypt 04:04
    18. Volume 2 - Theme Number Six 01:09
    19. Volume 2 - Toward Light 07:46
    20. Volume 2 - Sine Times Nine 02:46
    21. Volume 2 - Ecneuqes Rorrim 02:47

    22. Volume 3 - Pathway Six 02:29
    23. Volume 3 - Electronic Rhythm Number Five 05:03
    24. Volume 3 - Transmission Seven: Pathways Open 01:57
    25. Volume 3 - Inside The Wave 04:55
    26. Volume 3 - Memory Wiped 01:32
    27. Volume 3 - Building Obscured By Mist 02:11
    28. Volume 3 - Electronic Rhythm Number One 05:51
    29. Volume 3 - Foreshadowed 01:53
    30. Volume 3 - Hexden Channel 07:15
    31. Volume 3 - Transmission Two: Pathways Closed 01:08
    32. Volume 3 - Electronic Rhythm Number Eighteen 07:32
    33. Volume 3 - Theme Number Eight 01:53

    34. Volume 4 - Transmission Five: The Old Place 01:36
    35. Volume 4 - Dystopian Vector Part One 05:54
    36. Volume 4 - Transmission Thirteen: Line Of Sight 01:04
    37. Volume 4 - Electronic Rhythm Number Nine 04:48
    38. Volume 4 - Theme Number Seven 03:22
    39. Volume 4 - Electronic Rhythm Number Two 03:33
    40. Volume 4 - Electronic Rhythm Number Twelve 06:06
    41. Volume 4 - Transmission Nine: Black Light 02:53
    42. Volume 4 - Void Bound 05:04
    43. Volume 4 - Dystopian Vector Part Two 03:04
    44. Volume 4 - Evil Surrounds 04:45
    45. Volume 4 - Cont No Stop 03:07

    46. Volume 5 - Became Self Aware
    47. Volume 5 - Exhumed
    48. Volume 5 - Electronic Rhythm Number Thirteen
    49. Volume 5 - Theme Number Five 04:11
    50. Volume 5 - Return To Synth Mountain
    51. Volume 5 - Arlonica
    52. Volume 5 - Theme Sixty Eight

    Martin Jenkins, more commonly known as the artist Pye Corner Audio, epitomizes Lapsus' commitment to cutting edge sound experimentation. In 2017, he beguiled the electronic music community by releasing the 'Where Things Are Hollow' EP, on Lapsus Records. The Barcelona label is delighted to announce the release of ‘Where Things Are Hollow 2’, consisting of three brand new original cuts and a remix from none other than John Talabot.

    'Where Things Are Hollow 2' explores a spectral and hypnagogic terrain, establishing an electronic sound that at times invokes Jenkins’ more dance friendly facet -'Self Synchronize', 'Weather The Storm'– while also offering his familiar iridescent dreamlike ambient textures –'Phase B'– that featured prominently on his first EP. This second EP also includes a remix from John Talabot, unquestionably one of Spain’s most internationally recognised names over the last decade, who exquisitely reimagines 'Resist' -a song from the first EP-, transforming it into a cross between EBM and hypnotic techno. From a graphic design perspective, renowned artists Alex Trochut and Basora have once again collaborated on this project, repeating the formula that made the artwork for "Where Things Are Hollow" such a collector's item.

    TRACK LISTING

    A1. Self Synchronise
    A2. Weather The Storm
    B1. Resist (John Talabot Remix)
    B2. Phase B


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