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LIGHT IN THE ATTIC

Gold Leaves / Lee Hazlewood

Wont You Tell Your Dreams

    Limited edition 7" series on "smokey grey" vinyl with custom LITA juke-box style sleeve in a poly bag with custom die-cut sticker.

    Other artists in the series include Iggy Pop & Zig Zags covering Betty Davis, Mark Lanegan covering Karen Dalton, and Sweet Tea (feat. Alex Maas of the Black Angels & Erika Wennerstrom of the Heartless Bastards) covering Wendy Rene. More releases in the series to be announced.

    For the 10 Year Anniversary 45's Series, Gold Leaves record a hazy take on Lee Hazlewood's "Won't You Tell Your Dreams." Found on the flip side is Hazlewood's version, which was originally included on his solo album Requiem For An Almost Lady, released in 1971 on his label LHI.

    A-side is produced by Gold Leaves, engineered by Chris Early, and recorded in Seattle in September 2012.

    B-side features Lee's original version as remastered by John Baldwin for our recent compilation Lee Hazlewood - The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes, & Backsides (1968-71).

    TRACK LISTING

    Side A:
    Won't You Tell Your Dreams - Gold Leaves

    Side B:
    Won't You Tell Your Dreams - Lee Hazlewood

    One can hardly imagine the genre-busting, culture-crossing musical magic of Outkast, Prince, Erykah Badu, Rick James, The Roots, or even the early Red Hot Chili Peppers without the influence of R&B pioneer Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can’t be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli to Ludacris have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music.

    There is one testimonial about Betty Davis that is universal: she was a woman ahead of her time. In our contemporary moment, this may not be as self-evident as it was thirty years ago – we live in an age that’s been profoundly changed by flamboyant flaunting of female sexuality: from Parlet to Madonna, Lil Kim to Kelis. Yet, back in 1973 when Betty Davis first showed up in her silver go-go boots, dazzling smile and towering Afro, who could you possibly have compared her to? Marva Whitney had the voice but not the independence. Labelle wouldn’t get sexy with their “Lady Marmalade” for another year while Millie Jackson wasn’t “Feelin’ Bitchy” until 1977. Even Tina Turner, the most obvious predecessor to Betty’s fierce style wasn’t completely out of Ike’s shadow until later in the decade.

    Ms. Davis’s unique story, still sadly mostly unknown, is unlike any other in popular music. Betty wrote the song “Uptown” for the Chambers Brothers before marrying Miles Davis in the late ‘60s, influencing him with psychedelic rock, and introducing him to Jimi Hendrix — personally inspiring the classic album ’Bitches Brew.’

    But her songwriting ability was way ahead of its time as well. Betty not only wrote every song she ever recorded and produced every album after her first, but the young woman penned the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty’s career would be her unbending Do-It-Yourself ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn’t fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal.

    In 1973, Davis would finally kick off her cosmic career with an amazingly progressive hard funk and sweet soul self-titled debut. Davis showcased her fiercely unique talent and features such gems as “If I’m In Luck I Might Get Picked Up” and “Game Is My Middle Name.” The album Betty Davis was recorded with Sly & The Family Stone’s rhythm section, sharply produced by Sly Stone drummer Greg Errico, and featured backing vocals from Sylvester and the Pointer Sisters.

    TRACK LISTING

    If I'm In Luck I Might Get Picked Up 
    Walkin Up The Road 
    Anti Love Song 
    Your Man My Man
    Ooh Yea 
    Steppin In Her I. Miller Shoes 
    Game Is My Middle Name 
    In The Meantime

    Betty Davis

    They Say I'm Different - 2023 Repress

      One can hardly imagine the genre-busting, culture-crossing musical magic of Outkast, Prince, Erykah Badu, Rick James, The Roots, or even the early Red Hot Chili Peppers without the influence of R&B pioneer Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can’t be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli to Ludacris have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music.

      There is one testimonial about Betty Davis that is universal: she was a woman ahead of her time. In our contemporary moment, this may not be as self-evident as it was thirty years ago – we live in an age that’s been profoundly changed by flamboyant flaunting of female sexuality: from Parlet to Madonna, Lil Kim to Kelis. Yet, back in 1973 when Betty Davis first showed up in her silver go-go boots, dazzling smile and towering Afro, who could you possibly have compared her to? Marva Whitney had the voice but not the independence. Labelle wouldn’t get sexy with their “Lady Marmalade” for another year while Millie Jackson wasn’t Feelin’ Bitchy until 1977. Even Tina Turner, the most obvious predecessor to Betty’s fierce style wasn’t completely out of Ike’s shadow until later in the decade.

      Ms. Davis’s unique story, still sadly mostly unknown, is unlike any other in popular music. Betty wrote the song “Uptown” for the Chambers Brothers before marrying Miles Davis in the late ’60s, influencing him with psychedelic rock, and introducing him to Jimi Hendrix - personally inspiring the classic album 'Bitches Brew'.

      But her songwriting ability was way ahead of its time as well. Betty not only wrote every song she ever recorded and produced every album after her first, but the young woman penned the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty’s career would be her unbending Do-It-Yourself ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn’t fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal.

      Her 1974 sophomore album 'They Say I’m Different' features a worthy-of-framing futuristic cover challenging David Bowie’s science fiction funk with real rocking soul-fire, kicked off with the savagely sexual “Shoo-B-Doop and Cop Him” (later sampled by Ice Cube). Her follow up is full of classic cuts like “Don’t Call Her No Tramp” and the hilarious, hard, deep funk of “He Was A Big Freak.”

      TRACK LISTING

      Shoo-B-Doop And Cop Him 
      He Was A Big Freak 
      Your Mama Wants Ya Back
      Don't Call Her No Tramp 
      Git In There 
      They Say I'm Different 
      70's Blues 
      Special People

      Hiroshi Yoshimura

      Green

        * First ever reissue of this groundbreaking ambient work.
        * Produced in full cooperation with Yoshimura’s estate.
        * Unseen original handwritten track notes by Yoshimura.

        Barely known outside of his home country during his lifetime, the late Japanese ambient music pioneer Hiroshi Yoshimura has seen his global stature rise steadily in the past few years. The 2017 reissue of his lauded debut, Music For Nine Post Cards, along with a slow building cult internet following has helped ignite a renaissance in his acclaimed body of work, much of which has never been released outside of Japan. Known for his sound design and environmental music, Yoshimura worked on a number of commissions following the 1982 release of Music For Nine Post Cards, including works for museums, galleries, public spaces, TV shows, video art, fashion shows, and even a cosmetics company.

        Originally released in 1986, GREEN is one of Hiroshi Yoshimura’s most well-loved recordings and a favorite of the artist himself. Recorded over the winter of 1985-86 at Yoshimura’s home studio, the compositions unfold at an unhurried pace, a stark contrast to the busy city life of Tokyo. As Yoshimura explained in the original liner notes, the album title in the context of this body of work is not meant to be seen as a color, but is rather used to convey “the comfortable scenery of the natural cycle known as GREEN”—which perfectly encapsulates the soothing and warm sounds contained on the album, although it was created utilizing Yamaha FM synthesizers, known for their crisp digital tones.

        This edition marks the first reissue of the highly sought-after and impossible to find album. It features the original mix preferred by Yoshimura himself, previously available only on the initial Japanese vinyl release (a limited edition remixed version of the album, with added sound effects, was released on CD in the US). Additionally, this release is the first in our ongoing series, WATER COPY, focusing on the works of Hiroshi Yoshimura.


        Karen Dalton

        In My Own Time - 50th Anniversary Edition

          Karen Dalton’s 1971 album, In My Own Time, stands as a true masterpiece by one of music’s most mysterious, enigmatic, and enduringly influential artists. Celebrating the album’s 50th anniversary, Light in the Attic is honored to present a newly remastered (2021) edition of the album on LP, CD, cassette, and 8-Track.

          All audio has been newly remastered by Dave Cooley, while lacquers were cut by Phil Rodriguez at Elysian Masters.

          A newly expanded booklet—featuring rarely seen photos, liner notes from musician and writer Lenny Kaye, and contributions from Nick Cave and Devendra Banhart—rounds out the CD (32-pgs) and LP (20-pgs) packages.
          The Oklahoma-raised Karen Dalton (1937-1993) brought a range of influences to her work. As Lenny Kaye writes in the liner notes, one can hear “the jazz of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday, the immersion of Nina Simone, the Appalachian keen of Jean Ritchie, [and] the R&B and country that had to seep in as she made her way to New York."

          Armed with a long-necked banjo and a 12-stringed guitar, Dalton set herself apart from her peers with her distinctive, world-weary vocals. In the early ‘60s, she became a fixture in the Greenwich Village folk scene, interpreting traditional material, blues standards, and the songs of her contemporaries, including Tim Hardin, Fred Neil, and Richard Tucker, whom she later married. Bob Dylan, meanwhile, was instantly taken with her artistry. “My favorite singer in the place was Karen Dalton,” he recalled in Chronicles: Volume One (Simon & Schuster, 2004). “Karen had a voice like Billie Holiday and played the guitar like Jimmy Reed.”

          Those who knew Dalton understood that she was not interested in bowing to the whims of the record industry. On stage, she rarely interacted with audience members. In the studio, she was equally as uncomfortable with the recording process. Her 1969 debut, It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best, reissued by Light in the Attic in 2009, was captured on the sly when Dalton assumed that she was rehearsing songs. When Woodstock co-promoter Michael Lang approached Dalton about recording a follow-up for his new imprint, Just Sunshine, she was dubious, to say the least. The album would have to be made on her own terms, in her own time. That turned out to be a six-month period at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, NY.

          Producing the album was bassist Harvey Brooks, who played alongside Dalton on It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best. Brooks, who prided himself on being “simple, solid and supportive,” understood Dalton’s process, but was also willing to offer gentle encouragement, and challenge the artist to push her creative bounds. “I tried to present her with a flexible situation,” he told Kaye. “I left the decisions to her, to determine the tempo, feel. She was very quiet, and I brought all of it to her; if she needed more, I’d present options. Everyone was sensitive to her. She was the leader.”

          Dalton, who rarely performed her own compositions, selected a range of material to interpret—from traditionals like “Katie Cruel” and “Same Old Man” to Paul Butterfield’s “In My Own Dream” and Richard Tucker’s “Are You Leaving For The Country.” She also expanded upon her typical repertoire, peppering in such R&B hits as “When a Man Loves a Woman” and “How Sweet It Is.” In a departure from her previous LP, Dalton’s new recording offered fuller, more pop-forward arrangements, featuring a slew of talented studio musicians.

          While ‘70s audiences may not have been ready for Dalton’s music, a new generation was about to discover her work. In the decades following her death, a slew of artists would name Karen Dalton as an influence, including Lucinda Williams, Joanna Newsom, Nick Cave, Angel Olsen, Devendra Banhart, Sharon Van Etten, Courtney Barnett, and Adele. In the recent acclaimed film documentary Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, Cave muses on Dalton’s unique appeal: “There’s a sort of demand made upon the listener,” he explains. “Whether you like it or not, you have to enter her world. And it’s a despairing world.” Peter Walker, who also appears in the film, elaborates on this idea: “If she can feel a certain way in her music and play it in such a way that you feel that way, then that’s really the most magical thing [one] can do.” He adds, “She had a deep and profound and loving soul…you can hear it in her music.”


          TRACK LISTING

          Something On Your Mind
          When A Man Loves A Woman
          In My Own Dream
          Katie Cruel
          How Sweet It Is
          In A Station
          Take Me
          Same Old Man
          One Night Of Love
          Are You Leaving For The Country
          Something On Your Mind (alternate Take)
          In My Own Dream (alternate Take)
          Katie Cruel (alternate Take)
          One Night Of Love - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971
          Take Me - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971
          Something On Your Mind - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
          Blues On The Ceiling - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
          Are You Leaving For The Country - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
          One Night Of Love - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971

          Lou Reed

          Words & Music, May 1965

            Light in the Attic Records, in cooperation with Laurie Anderson, proudly announces the inaugural title in their ongoing Lou Reed Archive Series: Words & Music, May 1965.

            “To hear a tape containing their earliest demos, recorded on May 11, 1965, and locked away until now, is to hear traces of things rarely associated with The Velvet Underground: blues and folk, earthy and traditional, uncertain and hesitant… yet bristling with that rusty, caustic, Lou Reed spirit. It is a revelation.” – Will Hodgkinson, MOJO'.

            Light in the Attic Records, in cooperation with Laurie Anderson, proudly announces the inaugural title in their ongoing Lou Reed Archive Series: Words & Music, May 1965. Released in tandem with the late artist’s 80th birthday celebrations, the album offers an extraordinary, unvarnished, and plainly poignant insight into one of America’s true poet-songwriters. Capturing Reed in his formative years, this previously unreleased collection of songs—penned by a young Lou Reed, recorded to tape with the help of future bandmate John Cale, and mailed to himself as a “poor man’s copyright”—remained sealed in its original envelope and unopened for nearly 50 years. Its contents embody some of the most vital, groundbreaking contributions to American popular music committed to tape in the 20th century. Through examination of these songs rooted firmly in the folk tradition, we see clearly Lou’s lasting influence on the development of modern American music – from punk to art-rock and everything in between. A true time capsule, these recordings not only memorialize the nascent sparks of what would become the seeds of the incredibly influential Velvet Underground; they also cement Reed as a true observer with an innate talent for synthesizing and distilling the world around him into pure sonic poetry.

            Featuring contributions from Reed’s future bandmate, John Cale, Words & Music, May 1965 presents in their entirety the earliest-known recordings of such historic songs as “Heroin,” “I’m Waiting for the Man,” and “Pale Blue Eyes”—all of which Reed would eventually record and make indelibly influential with the Velvet Underground. Also included are several more previously-unreleased compositions that offer additional insight into Reed’s creative process and early influences. Produced by Laurie Anderson, Don Fleming, Jason Stern, Hal Willner, and Matt Sullivan, the album features newly-remastered audio from the original tape by GRAMMY®-nominated engineer, John Baldwin. Rounding out the package are new liner notes from acclaimed journalist and author, Greil Marcus, plus in-depth archival notes from Don Fleming and Jason Stern, who oversee the Lou Reed Archive, while the release has been designed by multi-GRAMMY®-winning artist Masaki Koike.

            ● All tracks previously unreleased.
            ● Produced in partnership with Laurie Anderson and the Lou Reed Archive.
            ● Inaugural release in Light in the Attic’s Lou Reed Archive Series.
            ● Features the earliest-known recordings of “I’m Waiting for the Man,” “Pale Blue Eyes" and “Heroin" as made famous by The Velvet Underground.
            ● Includes seven unheard Lou Reed compositions.
            ● Remastered from the original analog tapes by GRAMMY®-nominated engineer John Baldwin.
            ● Package designed by multi-GRAMMY®-winning artist Masaki Koike.
            ● Vinyl pressed at RTI.
            ● LP available on Standard Black Wax plus a Special Limited Color Edition.
            ● LP & CD include booklets featuring lyrics, archival photos, and liner notes by Greil Marcus, Don Fleming and Jason Stern (LP: 20-pgs, CD: 60-pgs)
            ● CD & Cassette include six unheard tracks recorded between 1958 and 1964, including early demos, a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right,” and a doo-wop serenade recorded in ‘58 when the legendary singer-songwriter was just sixteen-years-old


            TRACK LISTING

            I'm Waiting For The Man - May 1965 Demo
            Men Of Good Fortune - May 1965 Demo
            Heroin - May 1965 Demo
            Too Late - May 1965 Demo
            Buttercup Song - May 1965 Demo
            Walk Alone - May 1965 Demo
            Buzz Buzz Buzz - May 1965 Demo
            Pale Blue Eyes - May 1965 Demo
            Stockpile - May 1965 Demo
            Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams - May 1965 Demo
            I'm Waiting For The Man - May 1965 Alternate Version (CD/Cassette Only)
            Gee Whiz - 1958 Rehearsal (CD/Cassette Only)
            Baby, Let Me Follow You Down - 1963/64 Home Recording (CD/Cassette Only)
            Michael, Row The Boat Ashore - 1963/64 Home Recording (CD/Cassette Only)
            Don't Think Twice, It's All Right (Partial) - 1963/64 Home Recording (CD/Cassette Only)
            W & X, Y, Z Blues - 1963/64 Home Recording (CD/Cassette Only)
            Lou's 12-Bar Instrumental - 1963/64 Home Recording (CD/Cassette Only)

            Lou Reed

            Words & Music, May 1965 - Deluxe Edition

              ● All tracks previously unreleased.
              ● Produced in partnership with Laurie Anderson and the Lou Reed Archive.
              ● Inaugural release in Light in the Attic’s Lou Reed Archive Series.
              ● Features the earliest-known recordings of “I’m Waiting for the Man,” “Pale Blue Eyes" and “Heroin" as made famous by The Velvet Underground.
              ● Includes seven unheard Lou Reed compositions.
              ● 45 RPM 2LP set pressed on Audiophile-Quality 180-gram vinyl at RTI (NON-RETURNABLE)
              ● Features the only vinyl release of “I’m Waiting for the Man – May 1965 Alternate Version”.
              ● Remastered from the original analog tapes by GRAMMY®-nominated engineer John Baldwin.
              ● Package designed by multi-GRAMMY®-winning artist Masaki Koike.
              ● Includes bonus 7-inch record, housed in die-cut picture sleeve containing the first-ever vinyl release of six unheard tracks recorded between 1958 and 1964, including early demos, a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right,” and a doo-wop serenade recorded in ‘58 when the legendary singer-songwriter was just sixteen-years-old.
              ● Saddle-stitched, die-cut 28-page book featuring lyrics, archival photos, and liner notes by Greil Marcus, Don Fleming and Jason Stern.
              ● Archival reproduction of letter written by Reed to Delmore Schwartz, circa 1964.
              ● Includes CD containing complete audio from the package, housed in die-cut jacket.
              ● Entire package housed in stylized, die-cut gatefold LP jacket manufactured by Stoughton Printing Co.
              ● Foil numbered and limited to 7,500 copies worldwide. 

              Released in tandem with the late artist’s 80th birthday celebrations, the album offers an extraordinary, unvarnished, and plainly poignant insight into one of America’s true poet-songwriters. Capturing Reed in his formative years, this previously unreleased collection of songs—penned by a young Lou Reed, recorded to tape with the help of future bandmate John Cale, and mailed to himself as a “poor man’s copyright”—remained sealed in its original envelope and unopened for nearly 50 years. Its contents embody some of the most vital, groundbreaking contributions to American popular music committed to tape in the 20th century. Through examination of these songs rooted firmly in the folk tradition, we see clearly Lou’s lasting influence on the development of modern American music – from punk to art-rock and everything in between. A true time capsule, these recordings not only memorialize the nascent sparks of what would become the seeds of the incredibly influential Velvet Underground; they also cement Reed as a true observer with an innate talent for synthesizing and distilling the world around him into pure sonic poetry.


              TRACK LISTING

              I'm Waiting For The Man - May 1965 Demo
              Men Of Good Fortune - May 1965 Demo
              Heroin - May 1965 Demo
              Too Late - May 1965 Demo
              Buttercup Song - May 1965 Demo
              Walk Alone - May 1965 Demo
              Buzz Buzz Buzz - May 1965 Demo
              Pale Blue Eyes - May 1965 Demo
              Stockpile - May 1965 Demo
              Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams - May 1965 Demo
              I'm Waiting For The Man - May 1965 Alternate Version
              Gee Whiz - 1958 Rehearsal
              Baby, Let Me Follow You Down - 1963/64 Home Recording
              Michael, Row The Boat Ashore - 1963/64 Home Recording
              Don't Think Twice, It's All Right (Partial) - 1963/64 Home Recording
              W & X, Y, Z Blues - 1963/64 Home Recording
              Lou's 12-Bar Instrumental - 1963/64 Home Recording

              Various Artists

              Earl's Closet: The Lost Archive Of Earl McGrath 1970-1980

                Earl McGrath was the ultimate ’70s jet setter, an art collector and comic bon vivant who stumbled into the record business between legendary parties in New York and LA and discovered Daryl Hall and John Oates and then Jim Carroll. Atlantic founder Ahmet Ertegun gave Earl his own label, Clean Records, in 1970; Mick Jagger hired him to run Rolling Stones Records in 1977.

                Friend to Joan Didion, Andy Warhol, and a galaxy of luminaries, Earl was an inveterate tastemaker. Actor Harrison Ford, who before Star Wars fame was Earl’s handyman and pot dealer, called him “the last of a breed, one of the last great gentlemen and bohemians.”

                After Earl died in 2016, journalist Joe Hagan, author of the critically-acclaimed Sticky Fingers, the biography of Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner, discovered a trove of rare and unheard tapes in Earl’s apartment in New York—literally inside his closet. “I asked for a step ladder and the first box I pulled off the shelf was a master tape of Some Girls, the Stones album,” says Hagan.

                Now Light in the Attic Records proudly presents Earl’s Closet, a double album of the treasures discovered inside, including unheard music by Daryl Hall and John Oates, David Johansen, Terry Allen, Delbert McClinton, Warhol “Superstar” Ultra Violet, Detroit sax legend Norma Jean Bell, Jim Carroll and an eclectic cast of undiscovered artists who once vied for fame and glory—folk, rock, country, funk and R&B gems that virtually no one has heard in decades. Whether it’s the almost-famous power pop of Shadow from Detroit, or the Delfonics-style soul of the Blood Brothers Six, Earl’s Closet retraces the dreams of artists who once sent demos to Earl McGrath. Longtime Light in the Attic-affiliated reissue producer Pat Thomas assisted Hagan in tracking down the artists and finalizing the paperwork.

                At once an archival mixtape, a secret history and a journey into the heart of an era, Earl’s Closet features a deep booklet of documents, images and ephemera from Earl’s archive, expansive liner notes by Joe Hagan, who tracked down and interviewed the artists, and astonishing photographs by Earl’s late wife, the Italian countess Camilla Pecci-Blunt McGrath.


                TRACK LISTING

                Two More Bottles Of Wine – Delbert & Glen
                Baby Come Closer – Daryl Hall And John Oates
                Gonna California – Terry Allen
                Only Yourself To Lose - Kazoo Singers
                Christopher – Michael Mccarty
                Dixie Darling – Jim Hurt
                California – Mark Rodney
                Killer - Country (fondiler & Snow)
                Dry In The Sun – Daryl Hall And John Oates
                Oh La La - Shadow
                Cocaine Cowboy – Terry Allen
                How Do You Do (children Of The Most High) – Ultra Violet
                Invisible Lady – Johnny Angel (johnny Angelino)
                I See My Days Go By - Shadow
                Where Have All The Flowers Gone? – Blood Brothers Six
                Salt Showers – Len And Betsy Greene
                Holy Commotion – Paul Potash
                Sail Away - Jabor
                Funky But Chic – David Johansen
                Just Look-ah What You'll Be Missing – Norma Jean Bell
                Tension – The Jim Carroll Band
                Waiting For Me – Little Whisper And The Rumors

                Nancy Sinatra And Lee Hazlewood

                Nancy & Lee

                  Light in the Attic Records is proud to present the next instalment of the Nancy Sinatra Archival Series with a deluxe reissue of one of the most beloved duet albums of all time, Nancy & Lee.

                  Equal parts strong, sultry, and savvy, Nancy Sinatra has long been ahead of her time – both in her choices as an artist and as a business-woman. Unapologetically, she established her own path early-on and paved the way for decades of female artists to come – all while firmly maintaining control over her career, her image, and her music. Nancy Sinatra would change the face of music, fashion and culture.

                  Originally released in 1968, Nancy & Lee arguably represents the pinnacle of the collaborative efforts of one of pop music’s most unlikely pairings. Featuring lush orchestral arrangements by Billy Strange, and boasting the talents of famed Los Angeles session musicians The Wrecking Crew, the album’s enchanting and enduringly unique musical tableau propelled the album to success and sales of over a million copies worldwide. Few albums have an iconic cover equal in timeless appeal to the music inside, but Nancy & Lee is truly one for the ages..


                  TRACK LISTING

                  1. You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling
                  2. Elusive Dreams
                  3. Greenwich Village Folk Song Salesman
                  4. Summer Wine
                  5. Storybook Children
                  6. Sundown, Sundown
                  7. Jackson
                  8. Some Velvet Morning
                  9. Sand
                  10. Lady Bird
                  11. I’ve Been Down So Long (It Looks Like Up To Me)
                  12. Tired Of Waiting For You * (bonus Track)
                  13. Love Is Strange * (bonus Track)

                  Karen Dalton

                  In My Own Time - 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition

                    Karen Dalton’s 1971 album, In My Own Time, stands as a true masterpiece by one of music’s most mysterious, enigmatic, and enduringly influential artists. Light in the Attic is honored to celebrate the 50th anniversary of In My Own Time with a special edition of this monumental classic.

                    Featuring Dalton’s interpretations of songs like “Are You Leaving for the Country,” “When a Man Loves a Woman,” “Katie Cruel,” and her posthumously recognized signature performance, “Something On Your Mind,” will be available in a 50th anniversary Deluxe Edition, which expands exponentially upon Light in the Attic’s 2006 reissue of the album, co-produced by Nicholas Hill.

                    This 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition features the newly remastered (2021) In My Own Time album, presented on three sides of 45-RPM, 180-gram vinyl pressed at Record Technology Inc. (RTI), with the fourth side showcasing alternate takes from the album sessions. The set also contains two 7-inch singles, featuring previously-unreleased live recordings captured at Germany’s Beat Club in 1971, both pressed at Third Man Record Pressing and housed in tip-on jackets. All audio has been newly remastered by Dave Cooley, while lacquers were cut by Phil Rodriguez at Elysian Masters. A 20-page booklet—featuring rarely seen photos, liner notes from musician and writer Lenny Kaye, and contributions from Nick Cave and Devendra Banhart—rounds out the package, which comes housed in a special trifold jacket.
                    The Oklahoma-raised Karen Dalton (1937-1993) brought a range of influences to her work. As Lenny Kaye writes in the liner notes, one can hear “the jazz of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday, the immersion of Nina Simone, the Appalachian keen of Jean Ritchie, [and] the R&B and country that had to seep in as she made her way to New York."

                    Armed with a long-necked banjo and a 12-stringed guitar, Dalton set herself apart from her peers with her distinctive, world-weary vocals. In the early ‘60s, she became a fixture in the Greenwich Village folk scene, interpreting traditional material, blues standards, and the songs of her contemporaries, including Tim Hardin, Fred Neil, and Richard Tucker, whom she later married. Bob Dylan, meanwhile, was instantly taken with her artistry. “My favorite singer in the place was Karen Dalton,” he recalled in Chronicles: Volume One (Simon & Schuster, 2004). “Karen had a voice like Billie Holiday and played the guitar like Jimmy Reed.”
                    Those who knew Dalton understood that she was not interested in bowing to the whims of the record industry. On stage, she rarely interacted with audience members. In the studio, she was equally as uncomfortable with the recording process. Her 1969 debut, It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best, reissued by Light in the Attic in 2009, was captured on the sly when Dalton assumed that she was rehearsing songs. When Woodstock co-promoter Michael Lang approached Dalton about recording a follow-up for his new imprint, Just Sunshine, she was dubious, to say the least. The album would have to be made on her own terms, in her own time. That turned out to be a six-month period at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, NY.

                    Producing the album was bassist Harvey Brooks, who played alongside Dalton on It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best. Brooks, who prided himself on being “simple, solid and supportive,” understood Dalton’s process, but was also willing to offer gentle encouragement, and challenge the artist to push her creative bounds. “I tried to present her with a flexible situation,” he told Kaye. “I left the decisions to her, to determine the tempo, feel. She was very quiet, and I brought all of it to her; if she needed more, I’d present options. Everyone was sensitive to her. She was the leader.”
                    Dalton, who rarely performed her own compositions, selected a range of material to interpret—from traditionals like “Katie Cruel” and “Same Old Man” to Paul Butterfield’s “In My Own Dream” and Richard Tucker’s “Are You Leaving For The Country.” She also expanded upon her typical repertoire, peppering in such R&B hits as “When a Man Loves a Woman” and “How Sweet It Is.” In a departure from her previous LP, Dalton’s new recording offered fuller, more pop-forward arrangements, featuring a slew of talented studio musicians.

                    While ‘70s audiences may not have been ready for Dalton’s music, a new generation was about to discover her work. In the decades following her death, a slew of artists would name Karen Dalton as an influence, including Lucinda Williams, Joanna Newsom, Nick Cave, Angel Olsen, Devendra Banhart, Sharon Van Etten, Courtney Barnett, and Adele. In the recent acclaimed film documentary Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, Cave muses on Dalton’s unique appeal: “There’s a sort of demand made upon the listener,” he explains. “Whether you like it or not, you have to enter her world. And it’s a despairing world.” Peter Walker, who also appears in the film, elaborates on this idea: “If she can feel a certain way in her music and play it in such a way that you feel that way, then that’s really the most magical thing [one] can do.” He adds, “She had a deep and profound and loving soul…you can hear it in her music.”


                    TRACK LISTING

                    Something On Your Mind
                    When A Man Loves A Woman
                    In My Own Dream
                    Katie Cruel
                    How Sweet It Is
                    In A Station
                    Take Me
                    Same Old Man
                    One Night Of Love
                    Are You Leaving For The Country
                    Something On Your Mind (alternate Take)
                    In My Own Dream (alternate Take)
                    Katie Cruel (alternate Take)
                    One Night Of Love - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971
                    Take Me - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971

                    Nancy Sinatra

                    Boots - Reissue

                      “Dumb stuff, as Lee used to call it. Dumb doesn’t mean stupid. It means human and understandable. It was the sound of three guitars, drums, and bass. It was simple, very, very simple. I can still see the room, the studio. With Carol Kaye, Glen Campbell, Donnie Owens… I can still see them all sitting there and chunking away. I guess simple was the best way to explain it, uncomplicated.” – Nancy Sinatra.

                      Light in the Attic is proud to present the next installment of the Nancy Sinatra Archival Series with a deluxe reissue of Nancy’s first album, Boots.

                      The 1966 debut million-selling debut LP, introduced the sassy, blonde, go-go booted icon. Built around her Lee Hazlewood-penned hits, “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” and “So Long, Babe,” the folk-rock era milestone album features songs by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Hazlewood and more. The catchy and jangly pop hooks performed by the famed Los Angeles session musicians, The Wrecking Crew and Billy Strange’s innovative arrangements provided the perfect sound to help Nancy capture the attention of the world. The new reissue includes two bonus tracks recorded during the album sessions, the non-album b-side “The City Never Sleeps At Night” and the previously unreleased “For Some.”

                      Remastered from the original analog tapes by GRAMMY®-nominated engineer John Baldwin, the reissue is complemented by a new Q&A interview with Nancy and GRAMMY®-nominated reissue co-producer Hunter Lea.

                      The CD edition is housed in a digipak and features a 28-page booklet, while each vinyl set is presented in an expanded gatefold jacket (featuring a 20-page booklet)


                      TRACK LISTING

                      As Tears Go By
                      Day Tripper
                      I Move Around
                      It Ain't Me Babe
                      These Boots Are Made For Walkin'
                      In My Room
                      Lies
                      So Long
                      Babe
                      Flowers On The Wall
                      If He'd Love Me
                      Run For Your Life
                      The City Never Sleeps At Night (Bonus Track)
                      For Some (Bonus Track)

                      Leslie Winer & Maxwell Sterling / Tim Buckley

                      Once I Was

                        The latest installment of Light in the Attic’s exclusive vinyl and digital singles series features musician, poet, and author Leslie Winer collaborating with Manchester-born composer Maxwell Sterling on a truly gorgeous cover of Tim Buckley’s 1967 forlorn love song “Once I Was.”

                        Buckley’s original classic is found on the flip-side and initially taken from the release Lady, Give Me Your Key: The Unissued 1967 Solo Acoustic Sessions (FDR 631).

                        Artwork by Los Angeles-based fine artist Robbie Simon.


                        TRACK LISTING

                        Leslie Winer & Maxwell Sterling - Once I Was
                        Tim Buckley - Once I Was

                        Karen Dalton

                        In My Own Time - 50th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition

                          ● Definitive edition of Karen Dalton’s 1971 Masterpiece. Non-Returnable.
                          ● Two 180-gram, 45 RPM LPs cut from new 2021 transfers and pressed at RTI, featuring bonus tracks from the original album sessions
                          ● 12” 180-gram, 45 RPM EP: Live at The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival (May 1971), newly remastered (2021) and previously unreleased in any format. B-side includes a beautiful etching of Karen, illustrated by renowned artist Jess Rotter.
                          ● Previously unreleased 7” single: Live at Beat Club, Germany (April 1971)
                          ● Repro of 1971 French edition 7” single: Something On Your Mind b/w One Night Of Love
                          ● Both 7” singles pressed at Third Man Pressing and housed in old-style tip-on jackets
                          ● 20-page booklet featuring unseen photos and liner notes by Lenny Kaye, plus contributions from Nick Cave and Devendra Banhart
                          ● Replica Playbill for Montreux performance
                          ● CD of all tracks
                          ● Housed in a special, expanded trifold jacket
                          ● Limited to 2,000 sequentially foil numbered copies worldwide
                          ● Includes a 18”x24” fold-out movie poster of the acclaimed documentary film Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, illustrated by artist Matt McCormick

                          Karen Dalton’s 1971 album, In My Own Time, stands as a true masterpiece by one of music’s most mysterious, enigmatic, and enduringly influential artists. Light in the Attic is honored to celebrate the 50th anniversary of In My Own Time with the definitive edition of this monumental classic.
                          Featuring Dalton’s interpretations of songs like “Are You Leaving for the Country,” “When a Man Loves a Woman,” “Katie Cruel,” and her posthumously recognized signature performance, “Something On Your Mind,” will be available in a variety of formats, including a bonus-filled, 50th anniversary Super Deluxe Edition, which expands exponentially upon Light in the Attic’s 2006 reissue of the album, co-produced by Nicholas Hill.

                          The 50th Anniversary Super-Deluxe Edition features the newly remastered (2021) In My Own Time album, presented on three sides of 45-RPM, 180-gram vinyl pressed at Record Technology Inc. (RTI), with the fourth side showcasing alternate takes from the album sessions. The Super Deluxe package also includes the previously unreleased audio from her rare, captivating performance, Live at The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1st, 1971. This is the first time this audio has been made available in any physical format — presented on 180-gram 12-inch vinyl, pressed at Third Man Record Pressing, and featuring a stunning etching of Dalton by acclaimed artist Jess Rotter on the B-Side. Accompanying the bonus record is a replica playbill from The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, 1971, meticulously arranged and compiled from vintage source material by Darryl Norsen. In addition to the bonus 12”, the set contains a CD of all tracks included in the package and two 7-inch singles, featuring previously-unreleased live recordings captured at Germany’s Beat Club in 1971, both pressed at Third Man Record Pressing and housed in tip-on jackets. All audio has been newly remastered by Dave Cooley, while lacquers were cut by Phil Rodriguez at Elysian Masters. A 20-page booklet—featuring rarely seen photos, liner notes from musician and writer Lenny Kaye, and contributions from Nick Cave and Devendra Banhart—rounds out the package, which comes housed in a special trifold jacket, individually foil-stamped and numbered in a strictly limited worldwide edition of 2,000 copies.

                          The 50th Anniversary Super-Deluxe Edition also includes an 18”x24” fold-out movie poster of the acclaimed documentary film Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, illustrated by artist Matt McCormick. Directed by Robert Yapkowitz and Richard Peete and executive produced by Light in the Attic, Wim Wenders and Delmore Recording Society, the film chronicles the life, music, and legacy of Dalton and features interviews with family, friends, collaborators, and a variety of artists, including Peter Walker, Nick Cave, and country singer Lacy J. Dalton. Angel Olsen lends her voice to the film as the principle narrator, reading aloud from Dalton’s personal journal.

                          The Oklahoma-raised Karen Dalton (1937-1993) brought a range of influences to her work. As Lenny Kaye writes in the liner notes, one can hear “the jazz of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday, the immersion of Nina Simone, the Appalachian keen of Jean Ritchie, [and] the R&B and country that had to seep in as she made her way to New York."

                          Armed with a long-necked banjo and a 12-stringed guitar, Dalton set herself apart from her peers with her distinctive, world-weary vocals. In the early ‘60s, she became a fixture in the Greenwich Village folk scene, interpreting traditional material, blues standards, and the songs of her contemporaries, including Tim Hardin, Fred Neil, and Richard Tucker, whom she later married. Bob Dylan, meanwhile, was instantly taken with her artistry. “My favorite singer in the place was Karen Dalton,” he recalled in Chronicles: Volume One (Simon & Schuster, 2004). “Karen had a voice like Billie Holiday and played the guitar like Jimmy Reed.”

                          Those who knew Dalton understood that she was not interested in bowing to the whims of the record industry. On stage, she rarely interacted with audience members. In the studio, she was equally as uncomfortable with the recording process. Her 1969 debut, It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best, reissued by Light in the Attic in 2009, was captured on the sly when Dalton assumed that she was rehearsing songs. When Woodstock co-promoter Michael Lang approached Dalton about recording a follow-up for his new imprint, Just Sunshine, she was dubious, to say the least. The album would have to be made on her own terms, in her own time. That turned out to be a six-month period at Bearsville Studios in Woodstock, NY.

                          Producing the album was bassist Harvey Brooks, who played alongside Dalton on It’s So Hard to Tell Who’s Going To Love You The Best. Brooks, who prided himself on being “simple, solid and supportive,” understood Dalton’s process, but was also willing to offer gentle encouragement, and challenge the artist to push her creative bounds. “I tried to present her with a flexible situation,” he told Kaye. “I left the decisions to her, to determine the tempo, feel. She was very quiet, and I brought all of it to her; if she needed more, I’d present options. Everyone was sensitive to her. She was the leader.”

                          Dalton, who rarely performed her own compositions, selected a range of material to interpret—from traditionals like “Katie Cruel” and “Same Old Man” to Paul Butterfield’s “In My Own Dream” and Richard Tucker’s “Are You Leaving For The Country.” She also expanded upon her typical repertoire, peppering in such R&B hits as “When a Man Loves a Woman” and “How Sweet It Is.” In a departure from her previous LP, Dalton’s new recording offered fuller, more pop-forward arrangements, featuring a slew of talented studio musicians.

                          While ‘70s audiences may not have been ready for Dalton’s music, a new generation was about to discover her work. In the decades following her death, a slew of artists would name Karen Dalton as an influence, including Lucinda Williams, Joanna Newsom, Nick Cave, Angel Olsen, Devendra Banhart, Sharon Van Etten, Courtney Barnett, and Adele. In the recent acclaimed film documentary Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, Cave muses on Dalton’s unique appeal: “There’s a sort of demand made upon the listener,” he explains. “Whether you like it or not, you have to enter her world. And it’s a despairing world.” Peter Walker, who also appears in the film, elaborates on this idea: “If she can feel a certain way in her music and play it in such a way that you feel that way, then that’s really the most magical thing [one] can do.” He adds, “She had a deep and profound and loving soul…you can hear it in her music.”


                          TRACK LISTING

                          1. Something On Your Mind
                          2. When A Man Loves A Woman
                          3. In My Own Dream
                          4. Katie Cruel
                          5. How Sweet It Is
                          6. In A Station
                          7. Take Me
                          8. Same Old Man
                          9. One Night Of Love
                          10. Are You Leaving For The Country
                          11. Something On Your Mind (alternate Take)
                          12. In My Own Dream (alternate Take)
                          13. Katie Cruel (alternate Take)
                          14. One Night Of Love - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971
                          15. Take Me - Live At Beat Club, Germany, April 21, 1971
                          16. Something On Your Mind - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
                          17. Blues On The Ceiling - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
                          18. Are You Leaving For The Country - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971
                          19. One Night Of Love - Live At The Montreux Golden Rose Pop Festival, May 1, 1971

                          Angel Olsen / Karen Dalton

                          Something On Your Mind

                            Light in the Attic is honored to be releasing Angel Olsen’s gorgeous cover of Karen Dalton’s moving interpretation of ‘Something On Your Mind,’ a song that enduringly underscores the unspoken thoughts, painful truths and buried emotions between people and within oneself. Thematically, the song is universal and resonates as much with listeners today emerging from a post-pandemic world as it did for Karen Dalton when she first recorded it in 1971 for her second and final studio album, In My Own Time. “‘Something On Your Mind’ for me is about letting yourself face something that keeps setting you back,” says Angel Olsen, who has come to the forefront of Karen Dalton appreciators around the world, both in her contribution of this new interpretation and as the voice of Dalton’s personal journals in the recent documentary, Karen Dalton: In My Own Time. As part of the latest installment of LITA’s long-running cover series, Angel’s cover is found on the a-side, while the flip includes Karen’s 1971 version.


                            TRACK LISTING

                            Something On Your Mind - Angel Olsen
                            Something On Your Mind - Karen Dalton

                            Recorded at Cosimo Matassa’s Jazz City Studio in New Orleans in the early ‘70s and then lost to the ages, "Another Side" is one of Leo Nocentelli’s most personal and definitive moments ever cut to tape. A mixture of funky folk and rootsy, raw emotion (think Bill Withers and James Taylor meeting Allen Toussaint at Link Wray’s Three Track Shack), this previously unheard album shines like the sun on a spring day on the New Orleans fairgrounds. Backing Nocentelli is an all-star line-up of New Orleans royalty, including Allen Toussaint (piano), James Black (drums), and both George Porter Jr. (bass) and Zigaboo Modeliste (drums) of The Meters. Deeply introspective, the album features nine original songs by Nocentelli, plus a soulful rendition of Elton John’s “Your Song.” Half a century later, these recordings sound just as fresh and engaging as the day they were recorded.

                            What makes Another Side even more extraordinary, however, is the fact that the album—which could have easily become a classic in the ‘70s singer-songwriter canon—sat untouched for decades; miraculously surviving the devastating blow of Hurricane Katrina, only to be found 2,000 miles away at a Southern California swap meet in 2018 by record collector Mike Nishita.
                            The album’s incredible journey is documented in the liner notes by Sam Sweet (New York Times, Los Angeles Times), who spoke with Nocentelli and Nishita about the recording process and re-discovery of the tapes. Sweet’s full notes appear in the release’s accompanying booklet alongside hand-written lyrics by Leo Nocentelli. The first pressing of the vinyl edition will feature gold-foil treatment on cover and spine. Rounding out the package are original designs and layout by the multi GRAMMY®–winning designer Masaki Koike.

                            While Nocentelli was embedded in New Orleans’ R&B scene, he was also deeply inspired by the late 1960’s and early 1970’s rising singer-songwriters, and soon found himself exploring sounds that were miles away from his band’s hard-edged funk riffs. Whenever he had downtime from session work and shows, Nocentelli spent much of 1971 recording his newly-found, reflective, diaristic songs at Matassa’s Jazz City studio. Backed by longtime Meters bandmate George Porter Jr. on bass, Nocentelli crafted the lineups for his sessions to match the tone of the material. When he needed a pianist, he’d call Toussaint. For percussion on the slower songs, he used drummer Zigaboo Modeliste, but many of the tracks featured James Black—a frequent collaborator of Toussaint’s and a member of Ellis Marsalis’ jazz group, whom Nocentelli recalls as an “unbelievable” musician.

                            The recording, which Nocentelli fondly refers to as his “country-and-western-album,” paints a picture of a young man yearning to find a sense of purpose. “I was going through some changes which were reflected in the songs that I wrote during that time,” he tells Sweet. Among them is the mid-tempo “Getting Nowhere,” in which he expresses a sense of frustration, as he watches others find success around him. Similarly, “Till I Get There” details a man who is struggling to persevere in his goals. In the soaring “Tell Me Why,” meanwhile, the singer contemplates the existence of God.

                            Other songs center around fictional characters. “Pretty Mittie,” for instance, is sung from the perspective of a farmer who longs to give up his arduous life for the city. “You’ve Become a Habit” is about a man who falls for a sex worker named Fancy. “Riverfront” is based on stories that singer Aaron Neville shared, about his days working on the New Orleans waterfront. Nocentelli also chose to perform one cover: Elton John’s breakthrough hit, “Your Song.” The guitarist made the recently-released ballad his own—infusing it with a loping, head-nodding cadence, ever so tastefully “funkdafied” in true New Orleans fashion.

                            By the time that the album was finished, The Meters were busier than ever. They had just signed a record deal with Warner Brothers and were now the official house band at Toussaint’s studio, Sea-Saint. There, they not only backed artists on Toussaint’s Sehorn label but had also become the go-to session musicians for every major artist that recorded in New Orleans. Rather than focus on a solo career, Nocentelli poured his energies into The Meters’ next album. Eventually, time moved on, as did Nocentelli, and he decided to store his unreleased solo album at Sea-Saint for safekeeping.
                            In 2005, when Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, Sea-Saint was among its victims. While Toussaint (who passed away in 2015) had sold the hallowed studio in the mid-90s, hundreds of his archived recordings remained in the building. The new owner salvaged what he could from the flooded building, shipping everything to a storage facility in Southern California. Boxes of tapes sat there for more than a decade before moving to another unit, which foreclosed a year later. The contents were purchased in a blind auction and, days later, sold at a swap meet. The fact that record collector Mike Nishita just happened to be there was pure kismet.

                            Nishita, a DJ and brother to “Money Mark” Nishita (of Beastie Boys fame), recognized the Sea-Saint label on the boxes and purchased all 673 master tapes at the swap meet. He inspected the contents with his friend Mario Caldato Jr., the longtime audio engineer for the Beastie Boys. In addition to masters from Irma Thomas, Dr. John, Lee Dorsey, and Toussaint, there was a quarter-inch reel with Nocentelli’s name on it. As Caldato and Nishita played it back, they knew they had something special.

                            “There was nothing else like it,” writes Sweet. “An acoustic album by the greatest funk guitarist who ever lived. It was the tape Mike would play for people to show them how special the collection was. The best album in the vault was something nobody knew existed.”

                            Eventually, Nishita and Nocentelli connected, “He was so grateful, so sincere,” recalls Nishita. “I just kept thinking about how this music needs to be heard…Especially when you look at all the things that had to fall into place for these tapes to survive and be discovered this way.” As Nocentelli simply puts it, “Things happen for a reason, man.”


                            TRACK LISTING

                            Thinking Of The Day
                            Riverfront
                            I Want To Cry
                            Pretty Mittie
                            Give Me Back My Loving
                            Getting Nowhere
                            Till I Get There
                            You've Become A Habit
                            Tell Me Why
                            Your Song

                            Various Artists

                            Somewhere Between: Mutant Pop, Electronic Minimalism & Shadow Sounds Of Japan 1980-1988

                              All formats come with a free Piccadilly Records EOY Sampler CD whilst stocks last.

                              Somewhere Between: Mutant Pop, Electronic Minimalism & Shadow Sounds of Japan 1980–1988 hovers vibe–wise between two distinct poles within Light In The Attic’s acclaimed Japan Archival Series—Kankyō Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980–1990 and Pacific Breeze: Japanese City Pop, AOR & Boogie 1976–1986. All three albums showcase recordings produced during Japan’s soaring bubble economy of the 1980s, an era in which aesthetic visions and consumerism merged. Music echoed the nation’s prosperity and with financial abundance came the luxury to dream.

                              Sonically, Somewhere Between mines the midpoint between Kankyō Ongaku’s sparkling atmospherics and Pacific Breeze’s metropolitan boogie. The compilation encompasses ambient pop, underground electronics, liminal minimalism and shadow sounds—all descriptors emphasizing the hazy nature of the nebula. Out–of–focus rhythms wear ethereal accoutrements, ballads are shrouded in static, and angular drums snake skyward on transcendent tones. From the Avant–minimalism of Mkwaju Ensemble and Yoshio Ojima, to the leftfield techno-pop of Mishio Ogawa and Noriko Miyamoto (featuring members of YMO), and highlights from the groundbreaking Osaka underground label Vanity Records, these are blurry constellations defying collective categorization.

                              These tracks also exist in a space of transition when the major label grip on the Japanese recording market began to give way to the escalation of independents. Thanks to the idyllic economic climate and innovations in domestically–manufactured music gear, creators on the edges were empowered to focus on satisfying their artistic visions in the open headspace of home studios. While labels like Warner Music and Nippon Columbia explored new sounds through traditional channels, it was possible for Vanity, Balcony and other indie labels, not to mention self–released artists like Ojima and Naoki Asai, to publish their work via affordable media such as cassettes, 7" vinyl, and flexi–discs.

                              Expertly curated by Yosuke Kitazawa and Mark “Frosty” McNeill (dublab), Somewhere Between is a collection of music, much of it released for the first time outside Japan, that is bound more by energetic vibration than shared history, genre or scene. They are the sounds of transition and searching—a celebration of the freedom found in floating.


                              TRACK LISTING

                              Noriko Miyamoto - Arrows & Eyes
                              Mishio Ogawa - Hikari No Ito Kin No Ito
                              Yoshio Ojima - Days Man
                              Mkwaju Ensemble - Tira-Rin
                              R.N.A-ORGANISM - WEIMAR 22
                              Naoki Asai - Yakan Hikou
                              Takami Hasegawa - Koneko To Watashi
                              Mammy - Mizu No Naka No Himitsu
                              Dip In The Pool - Hasu No Enishi
                              Wha Ha Ha - Akatere
                              D-Day - Sweet Sultan
                              Perfect Mother - Dark Disco-Da·Da·Da·Da·Run
                              Neo Museum - Area
                              Sonoko - Wedding With God (À Nijinski)

                              Various Artists

                              Country Funk Volume III - 1975-1982

                                All formats come with a free Piccadilly Records EOY Sampler CD whilst stocks last.

                                The horse still bucks, the band still funks, and well…the fire still burns.

                                That’s right - Country Funk is back.

                                In the summer of 2012, a new sound blew in from the dusty desert. It was a sound difficult to pin down, to codify; a sound that, like some wild horse, resisted one’s grasp. But this was no trend, no flash-in-the-pan movement, no shotgun marriage of styles, no ma’am. This sound went back decades, back to the latter half of the 1960s and early 1970s when adventurous artists started to blend country hoedown harmony with the elation of gospel, the sexual thrust of the blues and a touch of inner-city grit. This was a new sound with a simple name: Country Funk.

                                Country Funk 1969-1975, first released in 2012 and co-produced by Zach Cowie, Patrick McCarthy and Matt Sullivan, brought together a disparate group of artists that were neither bound by geography nor a shared ideology, but connected through the simple feel of their songs. Country Funk is alternatively playful and melancholic, slow jammin’ and booty-shakin’. It’s a sound both studio slick and barroom raw, as evident in the artists featured on Volume I: Johnny Adams, Mac Davis, Dale Hawkins, Tony Joe White, Bobbie Gentry, Larry Jon Wilson, and many others. Just two years later, we chased Volume I with a new collection of songs for Country Funk 1967-1974 (LITA116, 2014). Volume II didn’t let up, dealing out all the loose-talking and lap-steel twangin’ one could handle. Heavy hitters like Willie Nelson, Townes Van Zandt, Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton and J.J. Cale shared barstools with the lesser-known voices of Bill Wilson, Donnie Fritts and Thomas Jefferson Kaye.

                                With Country Funk Volume III1975-1982 (LITA194) we’re here to say there’s more funk left in the trunk yet. This time around, the jeans are tighter, the hair is bigger and the disco ball spins along to a country-synth beat. Produced and compiled by Jason Morgan (Bay Area DJ/collector) and Patrick McCarthy (co-producer/compiler of Volume I & II), the tracklist features regulars Dolly Parton, J.J. Cale, Larry Jon Wilson and Tony Joe White (whose track is released here for the first time) alongside new faces like Steven Soles, Gary & Sandy, Conway Twitty, Travis Wammack, Billy Swan, Rob Galbraith, Brian Hyland, and so many more. As the 1970s began to wane and the 1980s approached, the Country Funk pallet expanded to include disco beats, heavy Moog synth bass lines and more clavinet than you could shake a stick at. Volume III shows artists continuing to buck traditional country tropes and production while embracing modern soul, disco, and coked-up 80s synth-pop. This is the true soundtrack of the Urban Cowboy. Saddle up, partners.


                                TRACK LISTING

                                1. Steven Soles - Shake The Dust
                                2. J. J. Cale - Nobody But You
                                3. Conway Twitty - Night Fires
                                4. Eddie Rabbit - One And Only One
                                5. Jerry Reed - Rhythm And Blues
                                6. Dolly Parton - Sure Thing
                                7. Billy Swan - Oliver Swan
                                8. Rob Galbraith - I Got The Fever
                                9. Travis Wammack - Do Me
                                10. Larry Jon Wilson - I Betcha Heaven’s On A Dirt Road
                                11. Gary & Sandy - Gonna Let You Have It
                                12. Brian Hyland - Hale To The Man
                                13. Tony Joe White - Alone At Last
                                14. Ronnie Milsap - Get It Up
                                15. Delbert McClinton - Shot From The Saddle
                                16. Terri Gibbs - Rich Man
                                17. Dennis Linde - Down To The Station

                                Various Artists

                                May The Circle Remain Unbroken: A Tribute To Roky Erickson

                                  All formats come with a free Piccadilly Records EOY Sampler CD whilst stocks last.

                                  Texan Roky Erickson was one of the true mind-blowing pioneers of psychedelic music. The original leader of the Austin-based 13th Floor Elevators formed in 1965, Erickson and band invented a brand new style of rock & roll, one that was slightly unhinged while it explored the consciousness-expanding influence of LSD on music. After three years, the group imploded with mental issues and legal challenges, ending with Erickson being incarcerated for several years in the Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Rusk, Texas. When he was released in the early ’70s the musician continued on his own trail, recording songs that had come to him in his far-flung cerebral wanderings. Erickson, who passed away May 31, 2019, is now celebrated on this 12-track tribute to one of the most original rockers ever.

                                  The participants range the whole world of modern music, and each chose one of Erickson’s originals to stamp their own imprint on. They include Lucinda Williams, Billy F Gibbons, The Black Angels, Margo Price, Mosshart Sexton (Alison Mosshart & Charlie Sexton), Neko Case, Mark Lanegan & Lynn Castle, Jeff Tweedy, Gary Clark Jr & Eve Monsees, Ty Segall, Chelsea Wolfe, and Brogan Bentley. With the full support of the Roky Erickson estate, the album is produced by Bill Bentley, executive producer of the 1990 Roky Erickson tribute album Where The Pyramid Meets The Eye on Sire Records, with associate producers Matt Sullivan, co-founder/co-owner of Light in the Attic, and Wyatt Bentley.

                                  The songs range from Erickson’s debut iconic original, “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” recorded when he was a member first in The Spades and then the 13th Floor Elevators during the early ‘60s in Austin, to some of Erickson’s later songs, like “If You Have Ghosts,” which heard him exploring some of the outer limits of the human psyche. Each new recording is a stunning modern take on the sound that Roky Erickson gave the world over a half-century of writing, recording and touring. No one has ever equaled those explorations.
                                  This truly is the music of the spheres, as Erickson once sang about his sound, as seen through the eyes and ears of those who are united in their love and respect for a person who dedicated his life to rock & roll. Roky Erickson, through the trials and tribulations of a man both imbued with greatness and haunted by darkness, never quit in his quest to share with others what he heard and saw. As he sang on the 13th Floor Elevators last recording, “May the circle remain unbroken.”


                                  TRACK LISTING

                                  Billy F Gibbons - (I've Got) Levitation
                                  Mosshart Sexton - Starry Eyes
                                  Jeff Tweedy - For You (I'd Do Anything)
                                  Lynn Castle & Mark Lanegan - Clear Night For Love
                                  The Black Angels - Don't Fall Down
                                  Neko Case - Be And Bring Me Home
                                  Margo Price - Red Temple Prayer (Two-Headed Dog)
                                  Gary Clark Jr. & Eve Monsees - Roller Coaster
                                  Ty Segall - Night Of The Vampire
                                  Lucinda Williams - You're Gonna Miss Me
                                  Chelsea Wolfe - If You Have Ghosts
                                  Brogan Bentley - May The Circle Remain Unbroken

                                  “The definition of a hidden gem” – John Peel
                                  “The world seems finally to be catching up to Leslie Winer, whose startling intelligence and singular vision shine through her copious recording life.” – Max Richter

                                  “When I Hit You - You’ll Feel It” is a 16-track anthology that celebrates the extraordinary work of musician, poet, and author, Leslie Winer. Spanning Winer’s three-decade-long musical career: from her groundbreaking solo work in the early ‘90s to her latest inspired projects and featuring musical contributions from Jon Hassell, Helen Terry, Jah Wobble, Renegade Soundwave’s Karl Bonnie, and others; the collection also spotlights Winer’s diverse collaborations, and unearths previously-unreleased recordings.

                                  Includes previously unreleased tracks, inspired collaborations, and material from Leslie’s groundbreaking 1990 solo debut, “Witch”.
                                  Newly remastered by the GRAMMY®-nominated engineer John Baldwin & includes a 24-page booklet featuring a new interview with Leslie and liner notes by acclaimed author, critic and compilation co-producer Wyndham Wallace, along with an essay by award-winning writer and scholar Louis Chude-Sokei.
                                  Cover collage by renowned British artist Linder and design by designer Christopher Shannon.

                                  Musician, poet, iconoclast, model, artist, enigma. Leslie Winer is many things.

                                  Born to a teenage mother and sold for $10,000 in a black market adoption when she was just hours old, Winer has always lived an uncommon life. She grew up in Boston with a voracious appetite for music and the written word and embraced the city’s lively jazz and folk scene in the ‘70s. Moving to New York for art school, she gravitated towards a vibrant crowd of intellectuals, artists, and radical thinkers—or perhaps they gravitated towards her.
                                  There, Winer formed an unlikely friendship with writer and artist William S. Burroughs and lived on-and-off with Jean-Michel Basquiat. In London, where Winer began her musical ventures in earnest, she was a regular at Leigh Bowery’s underground club Taboo, where she met many of her collaborators, including filmmaker John Maybury, Kevin Mooney (of Adam and the Ants), and Boy George, who once declared that Winer “might just be the coolest woman on the planet!”

                                  Winer’s striking looks also attracted fashion designers and photographers. Throughout the early ‘80s, she was an in-demand model—appearing in campaigns for Valentino, Christian Dior, and Yohji Yamamoto, and serving as a muse for a young Jean-Paul Gaultier, who later dubbed Winer “the first androgynous model.” She posed for Helmut Newton, Irving Penn, and Pierre et Gilles, and graced the covers of The Face, French and Italian editions of Vogue, and Mademoiselle.


                                  TRACK LISTING

                                  1. When I Was Walt Whitman - Leslie Winer
                                  2. N1 Ear - Leslie Winer
                                  3. Tree - Leslie Winer
                                  4. Personals - Jon Hassell And Bluescreen Featuring Leslie
                                  5. Dream 1 - Leslie Winer
                                  6. Dunderhead - Purity Supreme
                                  7. The Boy Who Used 2 Whistle - Leslie Winer
                                  8. Hold On Postcards - Leslie Winer
                                  9. He Was - Leslie Winer
                                  10. RoundUp Ready - Leslie Winer
                                  11. Skin - Leslie Winer
                                  12. Box - Leslie Winer
                                  13. This Blank Action - Diamond Version Featuring Leslie Winer
                                  14. Battle Porn - Leslie Winer
                                  15. Woodshedded - Leslie Winer & Jay Glass Dubs
                                  16. Fragment #2 - Leslie Winer & Mari G. Mooney

                                  The Black Angels

                                  Directions To See A Ghost - 2021 Reissue

                                    “The Black Angels bring the aura of mid-1966 the drilling guitars of early Velvet Underground shows, the raga inflections of late-show Fillmore jams, the acid-prayer stomp of Austin avatars the 13th Floor Elevators everywhere they go, including the levitations on their second album, Directions to See a Ghost. Mid-Eighties echoes of Spacemen 3 and the Jesus and Mary Chain also roll through the scoured-guitar sustain and Alex Maas’ rocker-monk incantations. But he knows what time it is. ’You say the Beatles stopped the war,” Maas sings in ‘Never/Ever.’ ‘They might’ve helped to find a cure/But it’s still not over.’ Even so, this medicine works wonders." – David Fricke, Rolling Stone

                                    Last time we met The Black Angels, they were staring into the desert sun somewhere outside of Austin, Texas. Two years later, night has fallen and the spirits have come out. It’s time for The Black Angels to provide Directions On How To See A Ghost.

                                    If you’re familiar with Passover, the band’s 2006 debut, you’ll know that The Black Angels’s music alone is enough to invoke spirits. There’s a name for the band’s sound; they call it ‘hypno-drone ’n roll’. It’s the sound of long nights on peyote, of dreams of a new world order, and of half-invented memories of the seamy side of ’60s psychedelia.

                                    While the Iraq war is still a major influence on the band’s lyrics, there are new forces at work here, including Eugene Zamyatin’s dystopian novel We and in Christian Bland’s words “psychic information from the past and future.” See, The Black Angels really are in contact with ghosts.
                                    “Civil War battlefields are prime spots for seeing ghosts,” says Bland. “One time at Kennesaw mountain in Georgia, I was climbing the mountain in the middle of June and it must have been close to 100 degrees, but in this one particular spot it was very cold. The hairs on my neck stood up and I knew something strange was happening. Then the wind whispered something like ‘retreat,’ and I did. I later learned that the spot where I was on the battlefield was known as ‘the dead angle’, the place where the fiercest fighting took place. The confederates ended up retreating from the mountain towards Peachtree Creek.”

                                    The Black Angels formed in Austin, Texas, in 2004, comprising from six people (now five) from very different backgrounds. Singer/vocalist Christian Bland is the son of a Presbyterian Pastor and was raised in a devoutly religious household. Bassist / guitarist Nate Ryan was born on a cult compound and drummer Stephanie Bailey claims she’s a descendent of Davy Crocket. She and Alex Maas (vocals/guitar) believe a little girl in a red linen dress haunts the group’s home.

                                    The band released Passover in 2006 to critical acclaim for both the album and the song “The First Vietnamese War”. Most of all, Passover established The Black Angels as a band with brains, balls and a strong message. And this time around, the message is there to read in a 16-page booklet that comes with the album.

                                    “Our central theme is that people need to open up their minds and let everything come through, and to learn from past mistakes,” says Christian. “Only then will we understand the reality of this world and progress beyond where we are now as humans. We’ve built upon that theme with Directions to See a Ghost. We want people to study the booklet we are providing with the album in hopes that they will be able to relate each song to something in their life.”
                                    _"War is Peace.

                                    Freedom is Slavery.
                                    Ignorance is Strength.
                                    Keep Music Evil."_


                                    TRACK LISTING

                                    You On The Run
                                    Doves
                                    Science Killer
                                    Mission District
                                    18 Years
                                    Deer-ree-shee
                                    Never/ever
                                    Vikings
                                    You In Color
                                    The Return
                                    Snake In The Grass

                                    Nancy Sinatra

                                    Start Walkin' 1965-1976

                                      All formats come with a free Piccadilly Records EOY Sampler CD whilst stocks last.

                                      Light In The Attic Records is proud to present Nancy Sinatra: Start Walkin’ 1965-1976. The definitive new collection surveys Sinatra’s most prolific period over 1965-1976, including her revered collaborations with Lee Hazlewood, over 23 tracks.

                                      Remastered from the original analog tapes by the GRAMMY®-nominated engineer John Baldwin, the collection is complemented by liner notes penned by Amanda Petrusich (author and music critic at The New Yorker), featuring insightful new interviews with Sinatra, as well as a Q&A with archivist and GRAMMY®-nominated reissue co-producer Hunter Lea. 

                                      As the eldest daughter of Frank Sinatra, Nancy was born into the spotlight. At 19, she made her professional debut in front of millions of Americans, appearing alongside her father and Elvis Presley on the television special Welcome Home Elvis. Not long after, she released a series of singles. But those demure recordings didn’t reflect the real Nancy Sinatra – that Nancy would be re-introduced to the world just a few years later, thanks to an unlikely musical partnership with songwriter and producer Lee Hazlewood.

                                      Nancy’s performance of Lee’s song “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” was a huge hit in 1966 and became her signature tune. The pair began a three year run of successful albums, duets and singles including “Sugar Town,” “Some Velvet Morning,” “Summer Wine,” “Sand,” “Jackson,” and the title track to the 1967 James Bond film “You Only Live Twice.”

                                      Start Walkin’ explores Nancy’s recordings with Lee, her inspired collaborations with songwriter Mac Davis (“Hello L.A., Bye Bye Birmingham”), producer Lenny Waronker (“Hook and Ladder”) and the “should’ve been hit” song with arranger/producer Billy Strange (“How Are Things In California.”)

                                      Over the years, she has been cited as an influence by countless artists, including Sonic Youth, Morrissey, Calexico, U2, and Lana Del Rey. Her haunting song “Bang, Bang” gained a new legion of fans when it appeared in the opening credits of Quentin Tarantino’s 2003 film, Kill Bill Volume 1. Most recently, Sinatra’s contributions to the industry were further recognized by her peers, when “Boots” was inducted into the GRAMMY ® Hall of Fame. The honor, bestowed in January of 2020, recognizes “musical recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance.”


                                      TRACK LISTING

                                      1. Bang Bang
                                      2. These Boots Are Made For Walkin’
                                      3. Sugar Town
                                      4. So Long Babe
                                      5. How Does That Grab You, Darlin’?
                                      6. Friday’s Child
                                      7. You Only Live Twice
                                      8. Summer Wine
                                      9. Some Velvet Morning
                                      10. Lightning’s Girl
                                      11. Sand
                                      12. Lady Bird
                                      13. Jackson
                                      14. Happy
                                      15. How Are Things In California
                                      16. Hook And Ladder
                                      17. Hello L.A., Bye Bye Birmingham
                                      18. Paris Summer
                                      19. Arkansas Coal
                                      20. Down From Dover
                                      21. Kind Of A Woman
                                      22. Machine Gun Kelly
                                      23. (L’été Indien) Indian Summer

                                      Various Artists

                                      Native North America (Vol. 1): Aboriginal Folk, Rock, And Country 1966-1985 - Repress

                                        Largely unheard, criminally undocumented, but at their core, utterly revolutionary, the recordings of the diverse North American Aboriginal community will finally take their rightful place in our collective history in the form of 'Native North America (Vol. 1): Aboriginal Folk, Rock, and Country 1966-1985'. An anthology of music that was once near-extinct and off-the-grid is now available for all to hear, in what is, without a doubt, Light In The Attic’s most ambitious and historically significant project in the label’s 12-year journey.

                                        Native North America (Vol. 1) features music from the Indigenous peoples of Canada and the northern United States, recorded in the turbulent decades between 1966 to 1985. It represents the fusion of shifting global popular culture and a reawakening of Aboriginal spirituality and expression. The majority of this material has been widely unavailable for decades, hindered by lack of distribution or industry support and by limited mass media coverage, until now. You’ll hear Arctic garage rock from the Nunavik region of northern Quebec, melancholy Yup’ik folk from Alaska, and hushed country blues from the Wagmatcook First Nation reserve in Nova Scotia. You’ll hear echoes of Neil Young, Velvet Underground, Leonard Cohen, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Johnny Cash, and more among the songs, but injected with Native consciousness, storytelling, poetry, history, and ceremony.

                                        The stories behind the music presented on Native North America (Vol. 1) range from standard rock-and-roll dreams to transcendental epiphanies. They have been collected with love and respect by Vancouver-based record archaeologist and curator Kevin “Sipreano” Howes in a 15-year quest to unearth the history that falls between the notes of this unique music. Tirelessly, Howes scoured obscure, remote areas for the original vinyl recordings and the artists who made them, going so far as to send messages in Inuktitut over community radio airwaves in hopes that these lost cultural heroes would resurface.

                                        With cooperation and guidance from the artists, producers, family members, and behind the scenes players, Native North America (Vol. 1) sheds real light on the painful struggles and deep traditions of the greater Indigenous community and the significance of its music. The songs speak of joy and spirituality, but also tell of real tragedy and strife, like that of Algonquin/Mohawk artist Willy Mitchell, whose music career was sparked by a bullet to the head from the gun of a trigger-happy police officer, or those of Inuk singer-songwriter Willie Thrasher, who was robbed of his family and traditional Inuit culture by the residential school system.

                                        Considering the financially motivated destruction of our environment, the conservative political landscape, and corporate bottom-line dominance, it’s bittersweet to report that the revolutionary songs featured on Native North America hold as much meaning today as when they were originally recorded. Dedicated to legendary Métis singer-songwriter and poet Willie Dunn, featured on the anthology but who sadly passed away during its making, Native North America (Vol. 1) is only the beginning. A companion set featuring a crucial selection of folk, rock, and country from the United States’ Lower 48 and Mexico is currently in production.

                                        TRACK LISTING

                                        1. Willie Dunn – I Pity The Country
                                        2. John Angaiak – I'll Rock You To The Rhythm Of The Ocean
                                        3. Sugluk – Fall Away
                                        4. Sikumiut – Sikumiut
                                        5. Willie Thrasher – Spirit Child
                                        6. Willy Mitchell – Call Of The Moose
                                        7. Lloyd Cheechoo – James Bay
                                        8. Alexis Utatnaq – Maqaivvigivalauqtavut
                                        9. Brian Davey – Dreams Of Ways
                                        10. Morley Loon – N'Doheeno
                                        11. Peter Frank – Little Feather
                                        12. Ernest Monias – Tormented Soul
                                        13. Eric Landry – Out Of The Blue
                                        14. David Campbell – Sky-Man And The Moon
                                        15. Willie Dunn – Son Of The Sun
                                        16. Shingoose (poetry By Duke Redbird) – Silver River
                                        17. Willy Mitchell And Desert River Band – Kill'n Your Mind
                                        18. Philippe McKenzie – Mistashipu
                                        19. Willie Thrasher – Old Man Carver
                                        20. Lloyd Cheechoo – Winds Of Change
                                        21. The Chieftones (Canada’s All Indian Band) – I Shouldn't Have Did What I Done
                                        22. Sugluk – I Didn't Know
                                        23. Lawrence Martin – I Got My Music
                                        24. Gordon Dick – Siwash Rock
                                        25. Willy Mitchell And Desert River Band – Birchbark Letter
                                        26. William Tagoona – Anaanaga
                                        27. Leland Bell – Messenger
                                        28. Saddle Lake Drifting Cowboys – Modern Rock
                                        29. Willie Thrasher – We Got To Take You Higher
                                        30. Sikumiut – Utirumavunga
                                        31. Sugluk – Ajuinnarasuarsunga
                                        32. John Angaiak – Hey, Hey, Hey, Brother
                                        33. Groupe Folklorique Montagnais – Tshekuan Mak Tshetutamak
                                        34. Willie Dunn (featuring Jerry Saddleback) – Peruvian Dream

                                        The Shaggs

                                        Shaggs' Own Thing

                                          When The Shaggs’ Philosophy Of The World came out in 1969, some people couldn’t or wouldn’t understand it. But many musicians, including Frank Zappa and Kurt Cobain, cited the Shaggs as a major influence. Heck, Zappa exclaimed they were “better than the Beatles!” NRBQ’s Terry Adams and Keith Spring were such fans, and after reissuing Philosophy in 1980 on their own Red Rooster label, Adams began work on a collection of recordings the Wiggin sisters had made in the years following their debut. The result was Shaggs’ Own Thing – a beguiling follow-up that reveals a more developed and mature sound while still retaining all of their homespun uniqueness.

                                          “The songs were better and they were recorded better, so it naturally made a better album,” Dot Wiggin said shortly after the original release of Shaggs’ Own Thing in 1982. It’s a “natural, organic extension” of the utterly original sound that The Shaggs had created, intentionally or not, with Philosophy Of The World, as John DeAngelis writes in the new liner notes. While Dot Wiggins originals like “You’re Somethin’ Special To Me” and “My Cutie,” and covers of classic songs like “Yesterday Once More” reveal a maturity not displayed on the debut, the two versions of “Shaggs’ Own Thing” and the revisiting of “My Pal Foot Foot” show that The Shaggs lost none of their pure and honest charm over the years.

                                          Remastered from the original tapes with liner notes by John DeAngelis, this reissue includes the bonus track “Love at First Sight,” first issued on the 1988 Red Rooster/Rounder Shaggs CD and appears on LP for the first time, plus three additional tracks on CD: “Sweet Maria” and “The Missouri Waltz,” first released by Light In The Attic as a limited-edition Record Store Day 45 in 2016, and the previously unreleased cover of the classic surf instrumental “Wipe Out.”


                                          TRACK LISTING

                                          You're Somethin' Special To Me
                                          Wheels
                                          Paper Roses
                                          Shaggs' Own Thing (Musical Version)
                                          Painful Memories
                                          Gimme Dat Ding
                                          My Cutie
                                          Yesterday Once More
                                          My Pal Foot Foot
                                          I Love, Shaggs' Own Thing (Vocal Version)
                                          Love At First Sight (Bonus Track)
                                          Sweet Maria (Bonus Track)
                                          Missouri Waltz (Missouri State Song) [Bonus Track]
                                          Wipe Out (Bonus Track)

                                          Various Artists

                                          Pacific Breeze 2: Japanese City Pop, AOR & Boogie 1972-1986

                                            When Light In The Attic released Pacific Breeze: Japanese City Pop, AOR & Boogie 1976-1986 in 2019, it was the first collection of its kind to be released outside Japan. It proved to be just what music fans had been waiting for—a compilation of sought-after tracks that had been nearly impossible to obtain unless you were well-connected with dealers and collectors, or traveled regularly to the countless record stores in Japan. Pacific Breeze included Minako Yoshida, Taeko Ohnuki, Hiroshi Sato and Haruomi Hosono among other key players of ‘70s-’80s Japanese City Pop, the nebulous genre that encompassed an “amalgam of AOR, R&B, jazz fusion, funk, boogie and disco, all a touch dizzy with tropical euphoria,” as we described it the first time around.

                                            With Pacific Breeze 2: Japanese City Pop, AOR & Boogie 1972-1986 we dig deeper into those sounds of bubble-era Japan. From the proto-City Pop funk of Bread & Butter and Eiichi Ohtaki to the crate-digger favorites Eri Ohno and Piper, the latest entry in Light In The Attic’s Japan Archival Series brings another set of sought-after tunes, most of which have never before been available outside of Japan. Tomoko Aran and Anri, also included in this compilation, are just a few of the artists who have gained popularity in recent years thanks to Vaporwave, the meme-genre that heavily samples Japanese City Pop to create its particular aesthetic.

                                            Pacific Breeze 2 once again feature the artwork of renowned Tokyo-based illustrator Hiroshi Nagai, whose iconic images of resort living have become synonymous with City Pop. Nagai’s urban tropical imagery is a perfect match for the expertly curated tunes, evoking a certain sense of nostalgia for the leisure lifestyles of ‘70s-’80s Tokyo, while simultaneously being perfectly in tune with the current zeitgeist.


                                            STAFF COMMENTS

                                            Ryan says: Light In The Attic return to the optimism and affluence of Japan’s City Pop era, digging a little deeper to find a wealth of sophisticated grooves largely unknown outside their homeland. Glistening with the sheen of a new technology, these tracks fused soul, funk and new wave influences into a pristine urban pop, perfectly suited to the heat and high rises of a modern Japan. Now you can savour the flavour of Eri Ohno or Yuji Toriyama while saving your air miles for a rainy day.

                                            TRACK LISTING

                                            1 Pink Shadow - Bread & Butter
                                            2 Yubikiri - Eiichi Ohtaki
                                            3 Vibration (Love Celebration) - Kimiko Kasai
                                            4 Kindaichi Kosuke No Theme - The Mystery Kindaichi Band
                                            5 Hidari Mune No Seiza - Tetsuji Hayashi BUY
                                            6 Last Summer Whisper - Anri
                                            7 Blind Curve - Momoko Kikuchi BUY
                                            8 I'm In Love - Tomoko Aran
                                            9 Kindaichi Kosuke Nishi E Iku - Yu Imai
                                            10 Tokyo Taste - Sadistics
                                            11 Hot Sand - Piper
                                            12 Rainy Saturday Coffee Break - Junko Ohashi & Minoya Central Station
                                            13 Skyfire - Eri Ohno
                                            14 Kanpoo - Yumi Murata
                                            15 Harumifutou - Kyoko Furuya
                                            16 Bay/Sky Provincetown 1977 - Yuji Toriyama

                                            Jim Sullivan

                                            Jim Sullivan

                                              On March 4, 1975, Jim Sullivan mysteriously disappeared outside Santa Rosa, New Mexico. His VW bug was found abandoned, his motel room untouched. Some think he got lost. Some think the mafia bumped him. Some even think he was abducted by aliens.

                                              By coincidence–or perhaps not–Jim’s 1969 debut album was titled U.F.O.. Released in tiny numbers on a private label, it too was truly lost until Light In The Attic Records began a years-long quest to re-release it–and to solve the mystery of Sullivan’s disappearance. Only one of those things happened, and you can guess which…

                                              Light In The Attic’s reissue of U.F.O. introduced the world to an overlooked masterwork and won him, posthumously (presumably), legions of new fans. Those new admirers are in for a real treat: a lavish reissue of Jim’s 1972 sophomore album, Jim Sullivan.

                                              The self-titled LP was originally released on Playboy mogul Hugh Hefner’s short-lived Playboy imprint. Horns sweeten this funky and bombastic session driven by Jim’s unmistakably larger-than-life voice and exceptional song-writing chops, alongside a cast of legendary session musicians including Jim Hughart. Another LP you’ll rarely see in the wild, it is by no means the poor relation of U.F.O., but rather a big stride into country, folk rock, and swampy blues, mesmerically finger-picked, brass-bedecked, and with that uniqueness of phrasing–part crooner, part jazz singer–that makes Sullivan such a rare performer.

                                              Each song could have been a bonafide radio hit, but with spotty promotion and negative connotations surrounding the Playboy name, the self-titled album suffered a fate known all too well and fizzled out. While Sullivan’s disappearance remains unsolved, his music endures and is finally gaining him the recognition he deserves, albeit long overdue.


                                              TRACK LISTING

                                              Don't Let It Throw You
                                              Sunny Jim
                                              Tea Leaves
                                              Biblical Boogie (True He's Gone)
                                              Lonesome Picker
                                              Sandman
                                              Tom Cat
                                              You Show Me The Way To Go
                                              Amos
                                              I'll Be Here
                                              Plain To See

                                              Jim Sullivan

                                              If The Evening Were Dawn

                                                On March 4, 1975, Jim Sullivan mysteriously disappeared outside Santa Rosa, New Mexico. His VW bug was found abandoned, his motel room untouched. Some think he got lost. Some think the mafia bumped him. Some even think he was abducted by aliens.

                                                By coincidence–or perhaps not–Jim’s 1969 debut album was titled U.F.O.. Released in tiny numbers on a private label, it too was truly lost until Light In The Attic Records began a years-long quest to re-release it–and to solve the mystery of Sullivan’s disappearance. Only one of those things happened, and you can guess which…

                                                Light In The Attic’s reissue of U.F.O. introduced the world to an overlooked masterwork and won Sullivan, posthumously (presumably), legions of new fans. Those new admirers are in for a real treat: a lavish, first-time release of a previously unheard 1969 studio session.

                                                If The Evening Were Dawn contains 10 acoustic solo recordings that have never seen the light of day. Whereas U.F.O. was bolstered by legendary sessioneers The Wrecking Crew, this is Jim Sullivan on his own terms, stripped down and soulful as ever. Recorded at a Los Angeles studio circa 1969, the session contains acoustic versions of a handful of U.F.O. tracks alongside a half dozen previously unheard songs. This, then, is the closest thing to those fabled Malibu bar performances at which Sullivan was first noticed.

                                                According to his widow, Barbara, this was the album Jim always hoped to record. It serves as an unprecedented glimpse into the mysterious, larger-than-life figure who’s become the stuff of legends.

                                                While Sullivan’s disappearance remains unsolved, his music endures and is finally gaining him the recognition he deserves, albeit long overdue. This recording serves as an unexpected missing piece of the puzzle; this is Jim Sullivan’s true swan song.


                                                TRACK LISTING

                                                Roll Back The Time
                                                Sandman
                                                Walls
                                                Jerome
                                                What To Tell Her
                                                Grandpa's Trip
                                                So Natural
                                                Whistle Stop / Mama
                                                What Is My Name
                                                Close My Eyes

                                                Lee Hazlewood

                                                400 Miles From L.A. 1955-56

                                                  Phoenix, Arizona 1955…a twenty-five year old disc jockey and fledgling songwriter, Lee Hazlewood, is trying to break into the music industry. He takes Greyhound bus trips to Los Angeles to pitch songs, only to be rejected each time. Undeterred, Lee starts a record label called Viv Records. Running the label out of his house, Lee finds the artists, writes the songs, produces the sessions, arranges the pressings of the records and handles distribution. Recently discovered tapes in the Viv Records archive yielded an unbelievable find, the earliest known recordings of Hazlewood singing his songs…Lee’s first demo! The mysterious and bountiful tapes featured Lee singing early unheard compositions and a complete first draft of his Trouble Is A Lonesome Town song cycle that would become his first official solo album in 1963.

                                                  Light in the Attic Records is proud to continue it’s Lee Hazlewood archival series with 400 Miles From L.A. 1955-56, a collection of previously unknown intimate recordings, never intended for release. Lee sings, plays guitar and even presses the record button on the tape machine. These are rural sketches and small town dreams, captured in an innocent time before the path ahead was clear.

                                                  These songs rewrite Lee’s recorded history, adding a new first chapter to his saga. For Hazlewood addicts, hearing these early tracks and the embryonic version of Trouble Is A Lonesome Town is akin to finding an early draft of the Old Testament.

                                                  “That’s beauty of Lee’s songwriting. It lives on. People will hear it for the first time, even though it’s fifty years old or whatever, if it’s good enough and strong enough, they’ll accept and like it as much as if it was just created. That’s the wonderful legacy that Lee has. It’s wonderful to look back and make all this early work available. To put “Boots” and all those other LHI songs into perspective. That it all started somewhere and this is where.” – Arizona Music Historian and record producer, John Dixon.


                                                  TRACK LISTING

                                                  Cross Country Bus
                                                  The Woman I Love
                                                  Five Thousand And One
                                                  Lonesome Day
                                                  A Lady Called Blues
                                                  Five More Miles To Folsom
                                                  Fort Worth
                                                  The Old Man And His Guitar
                                                  Peculiar Guy
                                                  Long Black Train
                                                  I Guess It’s Love
                                                  It’s An Actuality
                                                  Buying On Time
                                                  The Country Bus Tune
                                                  Long Black Train
                                                  Run Boy Run
                                                  Big Joe Slade
                                                  Son Of A Gun
                                                  Georgia Chain Gang
                                                  Look At That Woman
                                                  Peculiar Guy
                                                  The Railroad Song
                                                  Six Feet Of Chain
                                                  Trouble Is A Lonesome Town

                                                  Compiled by Andy Cabic (Vetiver), Zach Cowie (DJ & music supervisor) and Mark “Frosty” McNeill (dublab), "Pacific Breeze" documents Japan’s blast into the stratosphere. By the 1960s, the nation had achieved a postwar miracle, soaring to become the world’s second largest economy. Thriving tech exports sent The Rising Sun over the moon. Its pocket cassette players, bleeping video games, and gleaming cars boomed worldwide, wooing pleasure points and pumping Japanese pockets full of yen.

                                                  Japan’s financial buoyancy also permeated its popular culture, birthing an audio analog called City Pop. This new sound arose in the mid ’70s and ruled through the ’80s, channeling the country’s contemporary psyche. It was sophisticated music mirroring Japan’s punch-drunk prosperity. City Pop epitomized the era, providing a soundtrack for emerging urbanites. An optimistic spirit buzzed through the music in neon-bathed, gauzy tableaus coated with groove-heavy strokes.

                                                  "Pacific Breeze" is an expertly compiled collection of choice cuts that range from silky smooth grooves to innovative techno pop bangers and everything in between. Long-revered by crate diggers and adventurous music heads, this music has never been released outside of Japan until now. Including key artists like Taeko Ohnuki and Minako Yoshida, as well as cult favorites Hitomi Tohyama and Hiroshi Sato, the long-awaited release also features newly commissioned cover painting by Tokyo-based artist Hiroshi Nagai, whose iconic images of resort living have graced the covers of many classic City Pop albums of the 1980s.

                                                  Many of the key City Pop players evolved from the Japanese New Music scene of the early ’70s, as heard on Light In The Attic’s acclaimed Even a Tree Can Shed Tears: Japanese Folk & Rock 1969-1973, the first release of the ongoing Japan Archival Series. In fact, you could say City Pop set sail with a champagne smash from Happy End, the freakishly talented subversives who included amongst their ranks Haruomi Hosono and Shigeru Suzuki, both featured on this compilation. As Michael K. Bourdaghs noted in his book, Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon, this music was, “Deconstructing the line between imitation and authenticity.” Some of the best City Pop teeters in this zone—easy listening with mutant exotica, tilted techno-pop, and steamy boogie bubbling beneath the gloss.


                                                  STAFF COMMENTS

                                                  Patrick says: If like me, Ryan Horsebeach, Piccadilly supply teacher Michael and mailorder Sil, you've had your head turned by the sounds of Japan, you'll be giddy at the arrival of this LITA compiled collection of City Pop gems. Featuring a who's who of 80s Japan, and their best moments no less, this is sunkissed tropical synth pop with a heavy helping of Japanese soul. Sophisticated music from the future past, presented in typically lavish fashion from the mighty Light In The Attic.

                                                  TRACK LISTING

                                                  1. I Say Who - Tomoko Soryo
                                                  2. Kusuri Wo Takusan - Taeko Ohnuki
                                                  3. Midnight Driver - Minako Yoshida
                                                  4. Subterranean Futari Bocci - Nanako Sato
                                                  5. Sports Men - Haruomi Hosono
                                                  6. Coffee Rumba - Izumi Kobayashi
                                                  7. In My Jungle - F.O.E.
                                                  8. Sun Bathing - Akira Inoue, Hiroshi Sato, Masataka Matsutoya
                                                  9. Say Goodbye - Hiroshi Satoh
                                                  10. Drip Dry Eyes - Yukihiro Takahashi
                                                  11. Bamboo Vender - Masayoshi Takanaka
                                                  12. Lady Pink Panther - Shigeru Suzuki
                                                  13. Mykonos No Hanayome - Haruomi Hosono, Takahiko Ishikawa, Masataka Matsutoya
                                                  14. L.A. Night - Yasuko Agawa
                                                  15. Exotic Yokogao - Hitomi Tohyama
                                                  16. Machibouke - Tazumi Toyoshima

                                                  "Cochin Moon" (コチンの月 Kochin no Tsuki) is Haruomi Hosono's fifth solo album. Initially intended as a collaboration with illustrator Tadanori Yokoo, who traveled to India alongside Hosono (as part of a group) for inspiration; Yokoo ended up only drawing the cover, having been the worst victim of an outburst of severe diarrhea amongst the group during the trip, rendering this as a Hosono solo album. Cochin Moon was conceptually written as the soundtrack of a non-existent Bollywood film, a trait inspired by the artists' trip. The album includes performances by Tin Pan Alley keyboardist Hiroshi Satō and Yellow Magic Orchestra members Ryuichi Sakamoto & Hideki Matsutake. Despite being Hosono's first completely electronic solo album (at the time YMO's debut was still being recorded, making this Hosono's first electronic album to be released), the exotica feel of Hosono's previous solo work is still present. The first half of the album (named after an Indian hotel that the group was in for the trip, a picture of the hotel's front appears in the back of the album's packaging) consists of three thematically themed songs, the second half of the album (and Hosono's keyboard performance) is credited to "Shuka Nishihara" (西原朱夏), a pseudonym Hosono created as a play on Hakushū Kitahara's pseudonym.

                                                  TRACK LISTING

                                                  1. "Ground Floor···Triangle Circuit On The Sea-Forest" 
                                                  2. "Upper Floor···Moving Triangle" 
                                                  3. "Roof Garden···Revel Attack" 
                                                  4. "Hepatitis" 
                                                  5. "Hum Ghar Sajan" 
                                                  6. "Madam Consul General Of Madras" 

                                                  Haruomi Hosono

                                                  Hosono House

                                                    The unbelievably prolific Haruomi Hosono is one of the major architects of modern Japanese pop music. With his encyclopedic knowledge of music and boundless curiosity for new sounds, Hosono is the auteur of his own idiosyncratic musical world, putting his unmistakable stamp on hundreds of recordings as an artist, session player, songwriter and producer.

                                                    Hosono House is debut solo album by Japanese musician Hosono, released on May 25, 1973. Besides Hosono, this album also features performances by the group "Caramel Mama" (featuring Hosono's fellow Happy End member Shigeru Suzuki). Hosono wanted to emulate The Band's Music from Big Pink and James Taylor's One Man Dog. With this album, recording equipment technology had evolved enough for domestic recordings of good quality to be feasible, and going to the center of the city to reach a recording studio was somewhat inconvenient. The album was recorded for five hours every afternoon in a 144 square foot large bedroom in Hosono's residence in Sayama, Japan (with a 16-track mixing console in his living room). The instruments were recorded unprocessed from the amplifiers in a small room, leading to the album's unique sound. Hosono continued to develop the tropical style of Hosono House in his following works, Tropical Dandy and Bon Voyage co..

                                                    TRACK LISTING

                                                    A1 Â

                                                    Though most of the world may not know the songs of Lynn Castle, she is an artist whose work stretches across seven decades. Light In The Attic Records is very excited to continue its Lee Hazlewood Archive Series with Rose Colored Corner, a collection of intimate recordings Lynn Castle made with Jack Nitzsche in 1966 and her complete recorded output with Lee Hazlewood on LHI Records. For the first time ever Lynn is sharing recordings from her personal archive and telling her story.

                                                    In the 1960s Lynn became the first lady barber in LA just as long hair on men became hip. By day she was styling The Monkees, Boyce and Hart, Del Shannon, Sonny & Cher, the Byrds and countless others…by night she was writing songs. Despite lacking the desire to self promote and a crippling insecurity that made it hard to sing in front of anyone, her songs managed to bend the ears of such industry heavyweights as Phil Spector, Jack Nitzsche and Lee Hazlewood. “It was so hard to get me to sing,” explained Castle. “I had buried it so low, I didn’t think I was good at all. Lee heard my songs and thought I was fabulous. He said, ‘Oh my god, you’re really good! Let’s cut a record.’

                                                    Her sole 1967 45 “The Lady Barber" b/w "Rose Colored Corner,” released on Lee Hazlewood Industries is a slice of psychedelic pop heaven. A full length album was never completed, but her sparse demos with Jack Nitzsche give the listener a peek of what one might have sounded like. If you are familiar with Nitzsche’s mid-60s work with Tim Buckley, Bob Lind, and Buffalo Springfield…you can squint your ears and imagine her songs bejeweled with lush strings, finger cymbals, and delicate harpsichord. Instead, the songs remained unheard until now.

                                                    Just because her songs weren’t recognized at the time doesn’t diminish their magic. This music is meant to be found and heard. Though commercial success may remain elusive, sometimes strange premonitions are realized… “When I was young, making music in the ‘60s, I had this strange thought that one day I would be this old woman, and young people would come find me and tell me that my music meant something to them.” - Lynn Castle


                                                    TRACK LISTING

                                                    1. The Forest
                                                    2. I’m Getting Tired
                                                    3. New York
                                                    4. What In The World Would I Do
                                                    5. She Thinks She Feels
                                                    6. Rose Colored Corner
                                                    7. Lonesome Look-Out
                                                    8. The Stranger
                                                    9. The Puppet
                                                    10. Who Knows
                                                    11. The Lady Barber With Last Friday’s Fire
                                                    12. Rose Colored Corner With Last Friday’s Fire

                                                    Erasmo Carlos has no counterpart in the universe of Anglophone pop music that could begin to hint at his relevance, popularity and his complex relationship with the only Brazilian pop star more universally recognized than himself, Roberto Carlos. He may be a beloved pop star and household name in Brazil, but hardly because of the music found on the three albums reissued by Light In The Attic. While in retrospect they can be appreciated as some of his most creative, consistent and personal albums, they were also some of the least commercially successful and underappreciated of his long career, at least until recently. Embracing the artistic freedom of the global counterculture of the late sixties and early seventies, over the course of these three albums, Erasmo evolved from his bubblegum beginnings into a sophisticated seventies singer-songwriter. "Erasmo Carlos E Os Tremendões" (1970), "Carlos, ERASMO . . ." (1971) and "Sonhos E Memórias 1941-1972" (1972) collectively find this maturing teeny-bopper delivering a mix of world class psychedelic Rock, traditional Rock ‘N’ Roll, Soul, Funk, Folk, Bossa Nova, and Samba-Rock to an unsuspecting Brazilian audience.

                                                    "Sonhos E Memórias 1941-1972" is truly singular within Brazilian pop fusing rock, soul, jazz and singer-songwriter styles. It’s simultaneously rootsy, funky, modern and nostalgic. The lyrics are highly personal, searching for deeper meaning with lots of flower power imagery and language, while the music is tight, highly rhythmic, melodic and restrained in its delivery and effortless groove. Built around the future fusion trio Azymuth with keyboardist José Roberto Bertrami, drummer Ivan Conti aka “Mamão” and bassist Alex Malheiros, a majority of the album’s tunes make excellent use of this trio’s telepathic tightness, subtle funkiness, and melodic mastery. The album dabbles with a few different styles and rhythms, all telling Erasmo’s musical story be it Bossa Nova, Roots Rock, Hard Rock, ballads, and soulful grooves, but a certain sonic frequency or tempo alongside the autobiographical elements unite this masterwork.


                                                    TRACK LISTING

                                                    1. Largo Da 2ª Feira
                                                    2. Mané João
                                                    3. Bom Dia, Rock 'N’ Roll
                                                    4. Grilos
                                                    5. Minha Gente
                                                    6. Mundo Cão
                                                    7. Sorriso Dela
                                                    8. Sábado Morto
                                                    9. É Proibido Fumar
                                                    10. Vida Antiga
                                                    11. Meu Mar
                                                    12. Preciso Encontrar Um Amigo

                                                    The followup to Light In The Attic’s game-changing I Am The Center box set is finally here....

                                                    Three years in the making, The Microcosm: Visionary Music Of Continental Europe, 1970-1986 is the first major overview of key works from cosmically-taped in artists needing little introduction — Vangelis, Ash Ra Tempel, and Popol Vuh — and and unknown masterpieces by criminally overlooked heroes like Bernard Xolotl, Robert Julian Horky and Enno Velthuys...

                                                    Whereas I Am The Center called for a reconsideration of an entire maligned genre, The Microcosm requests nothing more than an open mind to consider this ambient, new age, neuzeit, prog, krautrock, cosmic, holistic stuff, whatever one calls it — as a pulsating movement unto itself, a mirror refracting the American new age scene in unexpected, electrifying ways, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt the universality of the timeless quest to express “the Ineffable” through music.

                                                    Drawing from major label budgets and homemade cassette distributed circumstances alike, The Microcosm demonstrates a depth of peace profound to behold, and clearly expands the boundaries. Lovingly conceived and lavishly presented by producer Douglas Mcgowan (Yoga Records) and liner notes contributor Jason Patrick Woodbury (Pitchfork, Aquarium Drunkard), The Microcosm features stunning cover paintings by Étienne Trouvelot, and labels by Finnish savant Aleksanda Ionowa.


                                                    STAFF COMMENTS

                                                    Patrick says: Chakras fully aligned after their expansive introduction to America's new age movement, 'I Am The Center', Light In The Attic hop across the pond to explore the cosmic vibrations and healing frequencies of Europe's spirit guides. Floating through German kosmische, Italian ambient and prog Français, '(The Microcosm)' resonates deep within your soul, courses through your body and opens your mind wider than an orgonite overdose.

                                                    TRACK LISTING

                                                    1. Vangelis - Creation Du Monde
                                                    2. Ralph Lundsten - Bön 5 - Förlåt Oss Våra Skulder (Prayer 5 - Forgive Us Our Debts)
                                                    3. Ash Ra Tempel - Le Sourire Volé
                                                    4. Popol Vuh - Brüder Des Schattens - Söhne Des Lichts (abridged)
                                                    5. Ariel Kalma - Orguitar Soir
                                                    6. Bernard Xolotl - Cometary Wailing (Valley Plateau)
                                                    7. Peter Michael Hamel - Einklang
                                                    8. Francesco Messina - Untitled
                                                    9. Roedelius - Wenn Der Südwind Weht
                                                    10. Deutsche Wertarbeit - Der Grosse Atem
                                                    11. Robert Julian Horky - Dance For A Warrior
                                                    12. Karl Schaffner & Lothar Grimm - Caravan
                                                    13. Suzanne Doucet & Christian Buehner - Shivas Dance
                                                    14. Enno Velthuys - Morning Glory
                                                    15. Deuter - Spirales
                                                    16. Gigi Masin - Ship Beetel 

                                                    Lizzy Mercier Descloux

                                                    Suspense - Light In The Attic Edition

                                                    * Remastered from the original tapes
                                                    * Essay by “Punk Professor” Vivien Goldman, interviewing key players
                                                    * LP Includes download card for full album + 6 bonus tracks
                                                    * CD includes full album plus 6 bonus tracks

                                                    By the time bohemian singer/poet/artist Lizzy Mercier Descloux recorded her fifth album, 1988's 'Suspense', she'd enjoyed a recording career that was as far from the clichés of music lore as is possible, flitting between genres, continents and collaborators, enjoying great success and equally great failure and even stealing the final breaths of master trumpeter Chet Baker for 1986's One For The Soul. When she came to make 'Suspense' she was, for the first time, working without her longtime muse, partner and manager Michel Esteban, with whom she'd first moved from their native France to New York, where it all began.

                                                    The pressure was on to repeat the success of “Mais Où Sont Passées Les Gazelles”, a smash hit in France, and Descloux's label were keen to make a conventional artist of her, pairing her with John Brand, an in-vogue producer with a style geared to a big, shiny 1980s chart sound - an approach Lizzy had never experienced before, nor intended to.

                                                    In Vivien Goldman's new liner notes, Esteban notes that Suspense sounds "less Lizzy than the other records, less open," but in splitting herself into two – English and Francophone – the album has two personalities too; oddly, it shines a light on the real Descloux that her cultural experiments never did.

                                                    Though the initial aim was to make a folky, acoustic album, the pop sound suited the singer, and “A Room In New York” is as fine and sparky as AOR gets. But when early single “Gueule D’Amour/Cry of Love” stiffed, EMI lost confidence and buried the LP. Bound by her contract to the label, Descloux moved away from music and focused on painting. She eventually settled in Corsica, the French island, where she died, aged 48, of cancer. Descloux's musical career ended, therefore, with the aptly titled Suspense. It was only a matter of time before this furiously creative artist's work was re-evaluated, and with these deluxe reissues, that time is now.


                                                    TRACK LISTING

                                                    01 Gueule D’amour
                                                    02 Cape Desire
                                                    03 Salomé
                                                    04 Vroom, C’est La Voie Lacée
                                                    05 The Long Goodbye
                                                    06 2 Femmes À La Mer
                                                    07 L’heure Bleue
                                                    08 Once Upon A Time Out
                                                    09 Echec Et Mat
                                                    10 A Room In New York
                                                    11 Gypsy Flame (English Version) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    12 Lucky Strike Drive (English Version) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    13 Playtime 4:13 (English Version) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    14 Hurricane 4:26 (English Version) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    15 Calypso Moguls (7” Version) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    16 Calypso Moguls (Tender Dub) (Bonus Track)*
                                                    * Bonus Tracks Available On CD And LP Download Card

                                                    Lee Hazlewood

                                                    Its Cause And Cure

                                                      The mid-to-late '60s were strange days for Lee Hazlewood. Having struck gold as songwriter and vocal foil for Nancy Sinatra, he signed up to MGM as an artist in his own right, and between 1966 and 1968, produced three ambitious solo albums that were eclectic, idiosyncratic, and most of all, unpredictable.

                                                      It was a happy time for Lee; his music was hot on the charts, he was fully immersed in his collaboration with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom.

                                                      The second of his MGM trilogy - 1967's peculiarly named Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure - took on countrified French ye-ye (“The Girls In Paris”), a tale of a young bullfighter built on Spanish guitar and choral cowboys (“Jose”), a string-drenched song about the passing of time (“The Old Man And His Guitar”), and a western epic about a Native American tribe (“The Nights”). And that was just the first four tracks. Elsewhere, the honky tonk madness of “Suzi Jane Is Back In Town,” the Byrds-like jangle of “In Our Time” and–in the bonus tracks–an instrumental named “Batman” confirm this to be one of Hazlewood's most far-ranging, far-out LPs ever.

                                                      It’s the result of two main factors: ambition–to top Phil Spector, primarily–and cash, which paid for orchestras, plush studios, and the inestimable talents of arranger Billy Strange. “I think the big sound of those records came out of the Spector thing,” says Hokom, in the new liner notes. “If you can have a big sound and you have money to burn… it was a flamboyancy.”

                                                      Released before the Nancy & Lee LP–a bona fide hit for Reprise Records–Hazlewoodism was a tougher nut to crack, a record that confused by combining po-faced delivery with unabashed comical touches. By 1967, Hazlewood had founded the LHI imprint, and was busy building his own empire–one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, plus predecessor, The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and follow-up, Something Special. Welcome to Hazlewood's magnificent–and mad–MGM years.

                                                      TRACK LISTING

                                                      1. The Girls In Paris
                                                      2. Jose
                                                      3. The Old Man And His Guitar
                                                      4. The Nights
                                                      5. I Am A Part
                                                      6. Home (I'm Home)
                                                      7. After Six
                                                      8. Suzi Jane Is Back In Town
                                                      9. In Our Time
                                                      10. Dark In My Heart
                                                      11. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Frenesi*
                                                      12. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Muchacho*
                                                      13. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Batman*
                                                      * Bonus Track

                                                      Arthur

                                                      Dreams And Images

                                                        The pantheon of performers known by but one name is full of superstars. Arthur - the nom de plume of singer-songwriter Arthur Lee Harper - is not one of them, but this gentle singer-songwriter and his wan, string-drenched, loved-up, psych-folk was probably never likely to be suitable for mass consumption.

                                                        Released on Lee Hazlewood's LHI label, the haunted Dreams And Images is the first of two albums from the Melbourne, Florida-born singer-songwriter. LHI was a broad church, taking in everything from soul to country, and Arthur found a home, a producer, and a champion in Hazlewood, who described him as "A man who will someday be a child again… A reason to cry and be unafraid… A bird with eighth-notes for wings."

                                                        Though his lonely, intimate music, shy demeanor, and stutter might not have suggested a man of great ambition, Arthur moved to Hollywood chasing the music industry dream. He suffered hardships to do so, living hand-to-mouth in a YMCA hostel with two like-minded individuals: Mark Lindsey Buckingham and Stephen John Kalinich, whose A World Of Peace Must Come has been reissued by Light In The Attic. "Arthur was a peace person. He was all about peace, love, and harmony," remembers Kalinich in the brand new, extensive liner notes for Dreams And Images. "He was a person that believed you could change the world. We thought we would be some of the ones to usher in peace."

                                                        While Kalinich and Buckingham were signed by the Beach Boys' Brother Records, Arthur allied with Hazlewood, having knocked on the door of the label's Sunset Boulevard HQ and auditioned on the spot. Entering the studio with Hazlewood, Donnie Owens, Tom Thacker, and arranger Don Randi, who brought baroque pop grandeur to the songs, Arthur let his music do the talking. "He stuttered and had a hard time getting his ideas out, so he would sing me the parts he had in mind,” remembers Randi.

                                                        A mixture of things conspired to make sure few people heard Arthur, including a packed release schedule at LHI, followed by the withdrawal of their major label funding and a lack of foundation on which to market the album. After the 1970 follow-up album, Love Is The Revolution, Arthur bowed out of the business, immersing himself in Christianity, family, and a career working first as a rocket engineer and, latterly, a teacher. "I never stopped writing or recording," he later said. "I recorded in studios, friends’ houses, and live. I just recorded music with my friends or by myself when I felt inspired. For me, singing and songwriting is like breathing; I just do it."

                                                        On January 10th, 2002, Arthur’s wife Lora died in a car crash. He tragically passed away of a heart attack the same night. Now, with this reissue of his great, lost album, Arthur's fragile heart can finally be enjoyed by all.

                                                        * First ever LP reissue, first time on CD & Digital
                                                        * Produced by Lee Hazlewood
                                                        * Featuring three unreleased tracks
                                                        * In-depth liner notes by LHI Archive Series co-producer Hunter Lea with unseen archive photos
                                                        * All tracks newly remastered from the original tapes
                                                        * LP housed in deluxe Stoughton “Tip-On” gatefold jacket.

                                                        TRACK LISTING

                                                        1. Blue Museum
                                                        2. Children Once Were You
                                                        3. Sunshine Soldier
                                                        4. A Friend Of Mine
                                                        5. Open Up The Door
                                                        6. Dreams And Images
                                                        7. Pandora
                                                        8. Wintertime
                                                        9. Living Circa 1920
                                                        10. Valentine Gray
                                                        11. 1860 *
                                                        12. Coming Home *
                                                        13. Excursion 13*

                                                        *Previously Unreleased

                                                        Peter Walker

                                                        'Second Poem To Karmela' Or Gypsies Are Important

                                                        Remastered from the original stereo 1/4" tapes LP and CD feature expanded gatefold tip-on jackets and liner notes.

                                                        Light In The Attic and the legendary folk/blues/roots label Vanguard Records are proud to begin a series of collaborations under the umbrella Vanguard Vault.

                                                        The series will explore the vaults of Vanguard and see the reissuing of obscure nuggets, psychedelic weirdness and just some good old-fashioned seminal music.

                                                        Originally released in 1968 on Vanguard Records, Peter Walker’s album “Second Poem To Karmela” Or Gypsies Are Important was a ground breaking blend of folk, raga, psychedelia, Eastern and Modal sounds that has remained unsung for decades. While his debut album for Vanguard,Rainy Day Raga, has been reissued several times on LP and CD, this album (his sophomore effort), remains an obscure and hard to find vinyl relic. Until now..

                                                        Carefully re-mastered from the original tapes, guitar scholar Glenn Jones recently interviewed Peter Walker for hours and has written a book-deep essay for the CD and LP liner notes that detail Walker’s association with an incredible cross-section of 1960’s counter-culture icons including LSD guru Timothy Leary (Walker personally provided ‘the soundtrack’ to many a trip), he studied raga music with Ali Akbar Khan, and like his close friend Sandy Bull, Walker worked on a fusion of Western and Eastern sounds. Jim Pepper plays flute on Second Poem (he also recorded with The Fugs and Don Cherry), other accompaniment to Walker’s guitar, Sarod and Sitar playing includes violin, organ, tablas, and tamboura.

                                                        This is true “acid folk” as interesting, progressive, and memorable as fellow 1960’s world travelers Robbie Basho, Davy Graham, and the Incredible String Band.

                                                        TRACK LISTING

                                                        1. Second Song
                                                        2. I & Thou
                                                        3. Southwind
                                                        4. Tear
                                                        5. Barefoot
                                                        6. Gypsy Song
                                                        7. Circus Day
                                                        8. Blake Street
                                                        9. Socco Chico
                                                        10. Mixture

                                                        Stephen John Kalinich

                                                        A World Of Peace Must Come

                                                          THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2014 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

                                                          "A World Of Peace Must Come is his masterpiece. That was fantastic." - Brian Wilson
                                                          "'Be Still' is the only song I've ever heard that made me want to be a better person." - Brian Barr, The Seattle Weekly

                                                          "The only other artist as pure as him is Captain Beefheart." - Bill Bentley

                                                          Stephen John Kalinich was born in Endicott, New York and grew up in Binghamton. In his early teens, he stared writing poems and articles about World Peace. He first came to California around 1964, fell in love with it, and promptly transferred from Harper College in upstate New York to UCLA.

                                                          Kalinich found himself immersed in the vibrant anti-War culture of late 60’s California, often writing songs and poems against the War. He found a musical partner and kindred spirit in Mark Lindsey Buckingham. They cut a demo for a track called "Leaves of Grass," inspired by the famous Walt Whitman poem "Leaves Of Grass", and Kalinich started taking demos around.

                                                          In the mid 60s, it was either at Brother Records or while pumping gas that Kalinich first met the Beach Boys. He hit it off with Brian, Carl and Dennis right away. As the first artist signed to the Beach Boys new label Brother Records, Carl Wilson produced a record for him. His first songs that saw release were "Little Bird" and "Be Still," which he wrote with Dennis and were released on the Friends album. His relationship with Dennis would lead to a number of further collaborations and Kalinich / Dennis Wilson co-writes, including: 20/20 - "All I Want To Do," Hawthorne, CA - "A Time to Live in Dreams", Pacific Ocean Blue - "Rainbows," and Bambu - "Love Remember Me.”
                                                          A World of Peace Must Come was recorded at various LA studios and Brian's house in Bel-Air in 1969. The tapes were promptly lost, not to be heard again until our discovery of them in 2008. Following the CD-only reissue in that year, this is the first time this timeless snapshot of an era and an ethos will be available on vinyl for Record Store Day 2014.


                                                          * First ever anthology
                                                          * Remastered from original sources
                                                          * 2xLP housed in a deluxe gatefold tip-on jacket with 20-pg book, and download card full full anthology
                                                          * Vinyl cut by John Golden and pressed at RTI
                                                          * CD housed in a deluxe gatefold tip-on jacket with 48-pg book
                                                          * Scholarly liner notes by Punk In Africa director Keith Jones
                                                          * Unseen photos, flyers, and band ephemera

                                                          The South Africa of the late 1970s was neither the right place nor time to launch a mixed-race punk band. Yet, following the student-inspired Soweto Uprising of 1976, it was also exactly the right conditions to foster a band like National Wake, one formed in an underground commune, and one whose very name exists in protest at the divisive, racist apartheid regime. Never before collected together, Light In The Attic is set to release National Wake’s full body of work as Walk In Africa 1979-81.

                                                          Featured heavily in the Punk In Africa documentary, National Wake played punk, reggae and tropical funk, equally at home in the city’s rock underground and the township nightclub circuit. Ivan Kadey started the band with two brothers, Gary and Punka Khoza. The three were from different worlds –while Ivan was an outsider, a Jewish orphan born in the traditional Johannesburg immigrant neighborhood, Gary, Punka and their family were forcibly moved to the troubled township of Soweto under the apartheid regime. Later joined by guitarist Steve Moni, the whole band grew up against a backdrop of township unrest, social upheaval and suburban tedium that characterized apartheid-era South Africa.

                                                          National Wake released just one album, in 1981. It sold approximately 700 copies before being withdrawn under government pressure. The band subsequently disintegrated, but their influence could be traced in the racially mixed post-punk underground centered around Rockey Street in Johannesburg throughout the 1980s, their legacy transmitted through fanzines and underground cassette trading.

                                                          Sadly, Gary and Punka Khoza both passed away in their 40s. Kadey now works as an architect in Los Angeles, but his attention eventually turned back to the band as their legacy grew in the digital era, with the emergence of specialized music websites and Punk In Africa leading to their rediscovery. Czech State Radio memorably described the band as “perhaps the most dissident music scene of the 20th century: a multi-racial punk band in a fascist police state.”

                                                          In 2011, Kadey re-released the band’s self-titled album, but spoke about having more than 20 tracks that had never seen the light of day –until now. “All of these recordings put together they speak of the whole evolution of the band,” he has said. “From a sort of naive, almost belief that we could miraculously change everything to realizing what a struggle it was, and what the country was going through and what it would go through.”

                                                          TRACK LISTING

                                                          1. International News
                                                          2. It's All Right
                                                          3. Walk In Africa
                                                          4. Time And Place
                                                          5. Corner House Stone
                                                          6. Mercenaries
                                                          7. Wake Of The Nation
                                                          8. Supaman
                                                          9. Speed It Up
                                                          10. Beat Up The Lights
                                                          11. Black Punk Rockers
                                                          12. Stratocaster
                                                          13. Everybody
                                                          14. Vatsiketeni

                                                          Various Artists

                                                          Wheedle's Groove - Seattle's Finest Funk & Soul 1965 - 1975

                                                            Taking their title from an Annakonda's 45 (Wheedle was the mascot of Seattle's SuperSonics basketball team), Light In The Attic bring us 21 brilliant tracks of funk and soul from the Emerald City, including 18 original 60s / 70s grooves, and three 00s cuts inspired by them. DJ Mr Supreme searches out the rarities that vied for the attentions of KYAC Soul Radio, including original compositions and cover versions of "Hey Jude", "Cissy Strut", "Louie Louie" etc. With band names like The Ovetton Berry Trio, Black And White Affair, The Clarence Mack Express, Cold, Bold & Together and Cookin' Bag, you know you're in for a treat!


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