Search Results for:

JAMAICAN RECORDINGS

Horace Andy

Dub Box - Rare Dubs 1973-1976

    Horace Andy [a.k.a.Sleepy] must possess one of the sweetest and most distinctive voices in reggae music. 1951 in Kingston Jamaica. He cut his first track in 1966 for producer George ‘Phil’ Pratt, a tune called ‘Black Man’s Country’. But it was four years later his star really began to shine when he joined the stable of Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd’s Studio One. It was Coxsone Dodd who renamed him Andy after another of his leading artists Bob Andy, such was his belief in Horace’s writing talent and singing abilities. Still only twenty years of age Horace used his falsetto talent to the fore and cut some impressive tracks at 13 Brentford Road, Studio One’s headquarters. Such reggae standards as ’Skylarking’, ‘Just Say Who’, ‘Love of a Women’ and ‘Something on my Mind’ to name but a few. The early 1970’s saw Horace due to political reasons move on to work with producer Bunny Lee, a move that suited his talents and beliefs, Horace being an early advocate to the Rastafarian faith.The tracks which he cut with Bunny, which we concentrate on here gave his songs a rootsy feel. The rhythms often cut at Channel ONE and Randy’s Studio17 and finalised at King Tubby’s, provided a fine backbone for Horace to recut some of his earlier classics, along side his newer songs also to become reggae standards. Like ‘Money Money’, ‘Zion Gate’ the great ‘You are my Angel’ and a version of The Heptones ‘My Guiding Star’. The power of these recordings were such that the earlier tracks like ‘Skylarking’ became hits a second time around.Proving that the ‘you can’t keep a good tune down’ mantra was alive and kicking… …A golden time for Horace and Reggae music in general… Horace would go on to work with other producers like Everton Da Silva in 1977 creating the ‘In the Light’ album and the New York based Lloyd ‘Wackies’ Barnes in the 1980’s for his ‘Dancehall Style’ recordings. Most recently his work with Massive Attack has brought his majestic voice full circle and back into the arena once more. Those ‘Massive’ recordings and this dub collection here seem to fit side by side. Horace’s distinctive vocal riding over the rhythms adding a magic as only he can .....

    RESPECT JAH FLOYD.


    TRACK LISTING

    1 Why Oh Why Dub
    2 Dub Larking
    3 Zion Dub
    4 Dub Money 
    5 A True Dub
    6 Dub Guidance
    7 Dub Say Who
    8 Dub On My Mind
    9 Love Of A Dub Band
    10 Use This Dub
    11 Dub Letter
    12 Dub Angel
    13 Bless This Dub*
    14 Dub Ah Fulfil*
    *CD Bonus Track

    Niney The Observer

    At King Tubby’s Dub Plate Specials 1973-1975 - 2022 Reissue

    Winston ‘Niney’ Holness, A.K.A. The Observer must be one of reggae’s finest Roots Rebel producers. Capable of making some of the heaviest, innovative music, not only in sound but also in the cultural / political sense. Born George Boswell, Montego Bay, Jamaica,1951, and name checked ’Niney’, due to losing a thumb in a workshop accident, he began his career in music by organising bands to play at school dances. But his first steps learning the musical ropes came working under the tutor ledge of producer Bunny Lee around 1967, organising sessions for Bunny’s stable of artists. He moved on to work alongside Lee Perry at Joe Gibb’s ‘Amalgamated’ label setup, where on Lee Perry’s leaving in 1969 to start his own ‘Upsetter’ label, Niney became chief engineer.

    Inspired by Perry’s success it wasn't long before his own ‘Destroyer’ label was under way. It was 1970, and his first production entitled ‘Mr Brown’ by DJ’s Dennis Alcapone and Lizzy, proved to be a minor hit, but his own ‘Blood and Fire’ track released in December of that year would become a major hit. After initial problems with it’s likeness to Bob Marley’s ‘Duppy Conqueror’, being ironed out, it’s reissue on his now named ‘Observer’ label, saw it go on to become, Jamaican Record of the Year 1971. Far out selling Bob Marley’s track to the tune of over 30,000 copies in Jamaica alone. A roots classic...

    Niney's reputation for building great roots tracks, was furthered with more success working with singer Max Romeo. Issuing cuts such as 'Beard man Feast', the great 'Reggae Matic' and 'Aily and Ailaloo' and renewing his relationship with Lee Perry on the track 'Rasta Band Wagon' who's production credit read Perry, Niney, Maxie. In 1973, Niney began working with Dennis Brown, who was already an established star from an early age, they found a chemistry that went on to produce some of Dennis's finest work.The 1973 hit 'Westbound Train' was followed in 1974 by 'Cassandra', 'I am the Conqueror' and the timeless 'No more shall I Roam'.Another important connection around this time was the great King Tubby who Niney would take his tapes along to and even record some of his tracks at Tubby's house, 18 Drummlie Avenue, Kingston, which doubled as his Studio of Dub.

    It's these tracks that we are concentrating on here, Tubby would strip the tracks back to the bone and rebuild them sometimes leaving off the hook line. Weather that be the horn line or keyboard line and adding effects over the top that could disguise the cut even more. Even Niney stating that when Tubby had finished witWinston Niney Holness aka The Observer must be one of reggae’s finest producers. Capable of making some of the heaviest, innovative music, not only in sound but also in the cultural / political sense. Born George Boswell, Montego Bay, Jamaica,1951, and name checked ’Niney’, due to losing a thumb in a workshop accident, his first steps learning the musical ropes came working under the tutorage of producer Bunny Lee around 1967, organizing sessions for Bunny’s stable of artists. He moved on to work alongside Lee Perry at Joe Gibb’s Amalgamated label, where on Lee Perry’s leaving in 1969 to start his own Upsetter label, Niney became chief engineer.

    Inspired by Perry’s success it wasn't long before his own Destroyer label was under way. It was 1970, and his first production entitled “Mr Brown” by DJ’s Dennis Alcapone and Lizzy, proved to be a minor hit, but his own “Blood and Fire” track released later that year would become a major hit. After initial problems with it’s likeness to Bob Marley’s “Duppy Conqueror”, being ironed out, its reissue on his now named Observer label, saw it go on to become Jamaican Record of the Year 1971. Far out selling Bob Marley’s track to the tune of over 30,000 copies in Jamaica alone. A roots classic...

    Niney's reputation for building great roots tracks was furthered with more success working with singer Max Romeo. Issuing cuts such as “Beard Man Feast', the great “Reggae Matic” and “Aily and Ailaloo” and renewing his relationship with Lee Perry on the track “Rasta Band Wagon” who's production credit read Perry, Niney, Maxie. In 1973, Niney began working with Dennis Brown, who was already an established star from an early age, they found a chemistry that went on to produce some of Dennis's finest work. The 1973 hit “Westbound Train” was followed in 1974 by “Cassandra”, “I am the Conqueror” and the timeless “No More Shall I Roam”. Another important connection around this time was the great King Tubby who Niney would take his tapes along to and even record some of his tracks at Tubby's house, 18 Drummlie Avenue, Kingston, which doubled as his Studio of Dub.

    It's these tracks that we are concentrating on here, Tubby would strip the tracks back to the bone and rebuild them sometimes leaving off the hook line. Weather that be the horn line or keyboard line and adding effects over the top that could disguise the cut even more. Even Niney stating that when Tubby had finished with a cut, he found it hard to recognize the track himself. It's these tracks as dub plate specials that Tubby would play on his Hometown HI - FI Sound System and it's these such tracks that have been compiled for this release. DJ, Arranger, Producer, his Roots Rebel Music still stands the test of time.
    h a cut, he found it hard to recognise the track himself.

    It's these tracks as dub plate specials that Tubby would play on his Hometown HI - FI Sound System and it's these such tracks that we have compiled for this release. Dub Plates that have not seen the light of day since tragically the great Osbourne Ruddock A.K.A. King Tubby was gunned down and murdered on the 06th of December 1989. For a few dollars and a gold chain, reggae music has lost one of its most inventive, creative forces.

    Niney also cut tracks with many other reggae giants, Gregory Issac's, Michael Rose, Junior Delgado, Horace Andy, Delroy Wilson to name but a few. As in house producer at the legendary Channel studios and supervising sessions at Dynamic and Randy's Studio17, his magic touched many. DJ, Arranger, Producer, his Roots Rebel Music still stands the test of time.


    STAFF COMMENTS

    Matt says: Considering their age, Niney's dubs still boom hard through any modern soundsystem. One of the darkest and heaviest producers of the wave first!

    TRACK LISTING

    1 Set Dub Free
    2 Lately Dub
    3 Dub With Tubby
    4 Dub Exclusive
    5 In Love With Dub
    6 No More Dub
    7 Here Comes Dub
    8 Tenement Dub
    9 Swallow Field & Dub
    10 Dubbing With Sally
    11 Dark Side Of Dub
    12 Dub In Silver
    13 Truthful Dub*
    14 Dub Born Here*
    *CD Bonus Tracks

    Lee Perry Vs Bunny Striker Lee

    Dub Soundclash

      What two great producers other then Lee Perry and Bunny Lee would be best suited for a Dub Soundclash. Both producers were integral at the birth of Dub music and would share many rhythms and sessions, their musical paths would cross all through their careers.

      It was in fact Bunny Lee’s rhythm that provided the back drop to Lee Perry’s ‘Shocks of Mighty cut. Jobs were passed from one to the other, Bunny Lee taking over Lee Perry’s position at Wirl records. Yes two producers whose paths always seemed to cross as it does with this release.

      We have selected some of Lee Perry’s rhythms, side one of this set, against some Bunny Lee rhythm on side two.You can hear the distinctive sound of Lee Perry’s Black Ark studio with his echo-plex giving his trademark whirling sound against Bunny Lee’s rhythms cut at many different studios. The winner of the Soundclash? We will leave that decision up to you the listener…..

      But in this Dub session there is no loser…

      ALL KILLER ..NO FILLER…ENJOY…

      TRACK LISTING

      Track 1 WAR INNA DUB Source:war Inna Babylon Rhythm
      Track 2 VAMPIRE DUB Source:vampire Rhythm
      Track 3 CURLY DUB Source:curly Locks Rhythm
      Track 4 WORDS DUB Source:words Rhythm
      Track 5 JUDGEMENT DUB Source:judgement Day Rhythm
      Track 6 PRAISING DUB DUB Source:thanks And Praise Rhythm
      Track 7 FIXING DUB Source:mr Fix It Rhythm
      Track 8 EVERY TRICK DUBWISE Source:every Trick In The Book Rhythm
      Track 9 PROMOTING DUB Source:everybody Need Promotion Rhythm
      Track 10 A HEAVENLY DUB Source:heaven Less Rhythm
      Track 11 M16 DUB STYLE Source:m16 Rhythm
      Track 12 A REAL ROCKING DUB Source:real Rock Rhythm
      Track 13 A DRIFTING WOOD Source:drifting Rhythm
      Track 14 SOLOMON WISE DUB*source:soloman Was A Wise Man Rhythm
      Track 15 SCRATCH CREATION DUB*source:scratch Creation Rhythm
      Track 16 BRUSH ME DUB* Source:sweaty Come Brush Me Rhythm
      *CD Bonus Tracks

      King Tubby's

      Lost Treasures

        King Tubby and Dub go together like Matt Ward and eccentric eyewear. Born Osborne Ruddock in Kingston in 1941, he grew up around High Holborn Street in Kingston, before moving to the new Waterhouse district in 1955. His electronic genius grew from working and fixing radios and TV sets. A natural progression led to working with amplifiers, and starting his own sound system, ‘Tubby’s Home Town Hi-Fi’. A very competitive games in the late 60’s - You were only as good as the EXCLUSIVE records you played. Tubby discovered during his time cutting discs for Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle set up, that by dropping vocals/instruments in and out of the backing tracks, you could invent new versions of existing old tunes. These early versions tried and tested on his sound system went down so well that he invested in a four track mixing console with delay echo effects, sliders and phasing units and so began King Tubby’s ‘Studio Of Dub’ at 18 Drummlie Avenue, Kinston 11 , Jamaica...his home. This is where all the producers would bring their tracks for Tubby to put his magic over. Most tracks that came out in Jamaica from here on in would carry a ‘Version’ on it’s B- Side more than likely a Tubby Dub. One of the producers who used him the most was Bunny Striker Lee, who’s labels Jackpot, Justice and Attack all carried Tubby’s mixes/versions on their flip sides. This collection, taken from original master tapes, showcases tracks you may know, but not in this radical form. So sit back and enjoy the dub master at work.

        Tapper Zukie

        Escape From Hell

          One of Jamaica's most talented artists, Tappa Zukie has had an equal impact on both sides of the recording deck, as both a hitmaking toaster and as a producer who has worked with the cream of Jamaica's vocalists. In addition, his early ties to the punk community in both London and New York was instrumental in the crossover of roots reggae into the mainstream. The album 'Escape From Hell' saw its initial release in 1977 as a ten track album. It has been somewhat overlooked due to the small numbers of its original pressings. Tappa was at the height of his peak period as a roots producer with Sly & Robbie and the Revolutionaries house band and then up-and-coming engineer Prince Jammy, who would replace Philip Smart as right hand man at King Tubby's legendary Waterhouse facility. The opening cut, Sidewalk Dub, sets the tone as a totally dubwise reading of Tappa's devotional 'My God Is Real', followed by the instantly recognizable "Massacra Dub", an enthralling cut of Prince Allah's wonderful anthem, 'Burial'. Population Dub takes the 'Take Five' riddim, itself being an adaption of Dave Brubeck's jazz favourite. Then there is Weather Umbrella a well known riddim originally made popular by Ray-I as 'Weatherman Skank', who used the Treasure Isle classic 'It's Raining'. Next up comes King Alpha In School, a spirited re-cut of the Ebony Sisters' 'Let Me Tell You Boy' that Tappa used earlier for Horace Andy's 'Stop Your Brutality', followed by the outstanding Experience Dub, a subtle counterpart to Horace's 'Natty Dread Weh She Want' (which borrowed lyrics and structure from an earlier Soul Syndicate hit whilst also making use of the melody of Alton Ellis' Studio One classic, 'Hurting Me'). 

          Prince Jammy became a King while cutting his musical teeth working for the dub master himself King Tubby. In that old Jamaican way, when everyone in Jamaica was given a new name to work with, Prince Jammy as he was known so impressed his colleagues that he rose from a Prince to a King, both names given to him by producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee. Out of the many protégés that trained and worked at King Tubby’s....and there were many, Scientist, Pat Kelly and Prince Phillip Smart to name but a few it was King Jammy’s work that was the main stay. On this system shaking disc of deep dubwise righteousness, Jamaican Recordings have selected a storming set of tunes that were rebuilt with King Jammy at the controls...Hold tight massive, this is tha lick!

          TRACK LISTING

          1. Folly Dub
          2. Jah Jah Dub Dub
          3. Dread Dub
          4. No Turn Back Dub
          5. Family Dub
          6. Every Tongue Dub
          7. I’m Still In Dub
          8. Empty Dub
          9. And The Lord Said Dub
          10. Tonight Dub
          11. Cinderella Dub
          12. Steppers Out Of Babylon Dub
          13. Leave Wrong Dub
          14. Africian Dub
          15. Mighty As A Dub

          Phillip Smart

          Meets The Aggrovators At King Tubbys

            Phillip Smart was one of the great engineers to learn his trade as understudy to the legendary dub master himself Osbourne ’King Tubby’ Ruddock. Alongside other luminaires such as Prince Jammy and Scientist, Phillip Smart would step in at the controls when demand for King Tubby studio dubs grew to such an extent that each single release was expected to carry a version / dub on the flipside.

            Phillip Smart moved to the United States in the late 70s and in 1981 opened his successful studio HC&F, in Long Island, New York. It produced some sizeable Jamaican dancehall hits for his two record labels TanYah and Eclipse.

            Tracks like Dirtsman’s ‘Hot This Year’ and ‘Rikers Island’, and most notably Shaggy, used the studio to work up his massive hits ‘Oh Carolina’, ’Big Up’ and ‘Angel’.

            But it’s in the heady days of the early 1970s and up to 1976 that Jamaican Recordings concentrate on for this release. When Version was King and Prince Phillip Smart was at the controls mixing up some fine dubs with Jamaica’s finest musicians The Aggrovators.


            Scientist

            Watch This - Dubbing At Tuff Gong

              When people think of Tuff Gong they usually think of the record label Bob Marley set up to release Wailers tracks in the 1960s. However Tuff Gong was also the name of a complex that included a top level recording studio, pressing plant and distribution centre.

              Located at the former residence of Island Records boss Chris Blackwell at 56 Hope Road, and moved to Marcus Garvey Drive following Marley's untimely death from cancer in 1981, Tuff Gong studios was used by many of Jamaica's top musicians and producers. 

              Engineers working at the facility included Errol Browne who had worked at Treasure Isle studios, and Hopeton Overton Browne known as “Scientist”, named by the great producer Bunny “Striker” Lee who, having worked with him previously at King Tubby’s and Channel One studios, described Browne's style as being like that of a scientist.

              For this release Jamaican Recordings focus on the work carried out by the great Scientist on the songs of the Black Solidarity Label run by Ossie Thomas (aka Joe The Boss) recorded at Tuff Gong studios. 

              Bunny Lee

              Bunny Lee's Kingston Flying Cymbals

                Bunny Lee’s "flying cymbals" or "flyers rhythms" dominated the dancehalls and the charts during 1974 and 1975. The style, based on Philadelphia disco or the "Philly Bump", the sound of an open and closed hi-hat was not necessarily novel but Striker’s innovations of bringing a number of different elements into play most certainly was. Johnny Clarke’s interpretation of Earl Zero’s ‘None Shall Escape the Judgement’ not only opens this set but also opened the floodgates for the flyers style.

                The story had begun the previous year with Lowell ’Sly’ Dunbar: "Sly played the flying cymbals first... I said to him that he played it on the Delroy Wilson tune for Channel One named ‘It’s a Shame’ and he also played it before that with Skin, Flesh & Bones on ‘Here I am Baby Come And Take Me’ the Al Green tune, when Al Brown sung it for Dickie Wong with the ‘tsk, tsk, tsk’ sound on the hi-hat. I named it "flyers" but they didn’t know what flyers was!!!” - Bunny Striker Lee

                Before too long ”Every tune we put out we put the rhythm behind it” says Lee, and every Kingston producer followed suit with their own variation of Striker’s Flying Cymbals rhythm.


                Various Artists

                Justice Dub - Rare Dubs From Justice Records 1975 - 1977

                  The reggae productions of Bunny ’Striker’ Lee were so extensive in the early to mid 1970’s that labels were created just to handle his ever expanding output. Three labels that came about during this time when dub was king, were Jackpot, Justice and Attack. For this new compilation Jamaican Recordings look at the Justice label and have compiled a collection of some of its finest dub cuts.

                  Bunny was at the birth of dub music and worked closely with King Tubby. he stored many of his masters at Tubbys studio, where they were always available for Tubby to work his magic over. Jamaican Recordings have gathered here what they think are some of the best dub cuts from this label and era. Hope you enjoy the set...


                  Tappa Zukie

                  Dub Em Zukie - Rare Dubs 1976 - 1979

                    Whilst Tappa is best known these days for his productions with the likes of Dennis Brown, Beres Hammond (Putting Up Resistance), Yami Bolo and others, in the mid-to-late seventies he was a dee-jay force to be reckoned with, scoring many big hits for Bunny Lee, Yabby U, Clem Bushay and his own Stars label, on which he also released sides by Junior Ross & The Spear, Prince Allah and even Horace Andy.

                    This collection brings together Tappa's tracks recorded with Bunnny Lee. Lee let Tappa loose on some of his riddim tracks to deejay over, which Tappa then re-dubbed, creating the backbone for his classic 'MPLA' LP. 'Dub Em Zukie' features the re-dubbed cuts, some previously unreleased. The set includes re-dubs of 'Man Next Door' ('Dub Next Door'), 'Invasion' ('Bagga Wire Dub') and 'Ballistic Affair' ('Ballistic Dub').

                    Musicians playing on the tracks include Sly & Robbie from their Revolutionaries' days, alongside Earl 'Chinna' Smith, Bobby Ellis, Winston Wright, Tommy McCook, Lennox Brown and Bernard 'Touter' Harvey; all luminaries of the era.

                    Niney The Observer

                    Dubbing With The Observer

                      Niney the Observer’s first dub album ‘Dubbing With The Observer’ was cut at King Tubby’s Studio with Tubby himself reworking Niney’s rhythms and adding his magic as only he could do. Niney The Observer (b. Winston Holness, 1951 Montego Bay, Jamaica) by the early 70’s had forged a successful working partnership with singer Dennis Brown cutting some of his best songs adding a more rootsy element to the singers sound. *Songs like ‘Westbound Train’, ‘No More Will I Roam’, ‘I Am the Conqueror’ to name but a few. Also cutting a hit for Ken Boothe ‘Silver Words’ and two other singers that Niney had grown up with, Max Romeo ‘That Was Love’ and Delroy Wilson ‘Halfway Up The Stairs’. It was these tracks and a few other Dennis Brown worked rhythms, that Niney took to King Tubby’s studio at 18 Drumilly Avenue, Kingston 11, with the intention to let Tubby remix and enhance the rhythms Tubby Style. The result was to be Niney’s first Dub album the mighty ‘Dubbing with the Observer’. On completion it was sent to London and it was then released on Trojan records and named Dub album of the Year. We are proud to put that album back out there for all to hear, what has now become a dub classic

                      Winston Wright

                      The Liquidator Strikes Back

                        Winston Wright is another unsung hero from the Jamaican musical cannon. Although many might not know his name, you will have heard him on many records in your collections. If we tell you that he played the classic Hammond organ riff on ‘Liquidator’ as part of the Harry J Allstars, I'm sure you'll be sitting up and taking notice.

                        Winston Wright began his musical career in the 1960s as a session player and soon became an integral part of the Treasure Isle Studio house band, that became known as Tommy McCook’s Supersonics . He played on many of the Rocksteady era hits that Duke Reid ruled the island with between 1966-1968.His mastery of the Hammond organ made him an in demand session player. One such was Harry J studio’s that had a massive hit in the UK in 1969 with ‘Liquidator’ as the Harry J Allstars. The same year saw him cut some great tunes as part of Clancy Eccles’ Dynamites.

                        The 1970s saw Winston Wright working closely with Dynamic Sounds Studios’ nucleus of musicians Cutting material for all the top producers of the time including numerous sides for Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee, which we have focused on for this set of tunes. From 1975 onwards Winston Wright was a member of Toots and the Maytals’ touring band, but we celebrate here his mighty fine studio work. Adding his touches to many a fine rhythm as only Winston could we hope you enjoy the set.


                        Johnny Clarke

                        Dread A Dub

                          Johnny Clarke is one of the great vocalists that ruled the Jamaican Dancehall scene from the mid - 1970s to the early 1980’s. While Bob Marley was out conquering the world, Dennis Brown, Gregory Issacs and Johnny Clarke were winning the hearts of the Jamaican people. Johnny Clarke’s use of the ‘Flying Cymbal‘ sound took the Island by storm and produced a run of hit singles few could match.

                          Johnny Clarke (b.1955, Jamaica, West Indies) cut his first record ‘God Made The Sea and Sun’, after winning a local singing contest in the Bull Bay area of Jamaica. Although the single was not a hit, it led to two follow up tracks for producer Rupie Edwards, ’Everyday Wandering’ and ‘Julie’ that fared much better, both on the island and oversees in England and Canada. These tracks also brought the singer to the attention of producer Bunny Lee and a working relationship that would go on to produce a prolific catalogue of music. Johnny Clarke’s Dread Conscious / Love Song style were to grace many hits around this time in 1974. Such tunes as ‘None Shall Escape The Judgement’, ‘Move Out of Babylon’, ‘Rock With Me Baby’, ‘Enter The Gates With Praise’ to name but a few. All new songs added to a host of cover tunes, recommended by Bunny Lee, many taken from the singer John Holt’s catalogue, that suited Clarke’s vocal style. The rhythms were cut at various studios around the Island. Randy’s Studio 17, Channel 1, Treasure Isle, Dynamic Sounds and Harry J’s, by a group of musicians loosely called the Aggrovators and some tunes incorporating the ‘Flying Cymbal’ sound again introduced by Bunny Lee, working the HiHat in fine style. The tracks were then taken to King Tubby’s studio where Johnny Clarke’s vocals would be voiced.

                          The Congos possess what all bands look for, that unique distinctive sound that draws the listener in. Alongside the great songs, lead singer Cedric Myton’s singing, phasing and falsetto voice makes that just the case. The Congos were formed by Cedric Myton (b. 1947, St Catherine, Jamaica) around the mid-Seventies when the Rasta message was central to the reggae sound coming out of Kingston, Jamaica. But he had started out in the Rocksteady era, when he formed the vocal group ‘Tartans’, taking lead vocal duties alongside Devon Russell, Prince Lincoln Thompson and Lindbergh Lewis.They cut ‘Dance All Night’ (1967) and ‘Coming On Strong’ (1968). The line-Up became The Royal Rasses and from this Cedric moved on to form the Congos on meeting Roydel Johnson, who had previously sang with Ras Michael and the Sons of Negas. Cedric’s Rasta roots were firmly in place when he went to work with producer Lee Perry to cut the seminal album ‘Heart Of The Congos’ at Perry’s just built, Black Ark Studios in 1977. Cedric Myton has carried on the mantle, cutting a set of tunes with the help of his good friend Mr Brent Dowe, who had previously sang lead vocals with the Melodians. This is the dub set to the vocal album released on the Kingston Sounds label called ‘The Congos Feast’. With such strong songs, rhythms and vocals it always had the chemistry for a great dub set. Hope you agree and enjoy the dub excursion…

                          STAFF COMMENTS

                          Philippa says: The dub set to the vocal album 'The Congos Feast'.

                          TRACK LISTING

                          1 A Fat Dub
                          2 A Party
                          3 Gods Kingdom Dub
                          4 Carry To The Well Dub
                          5 Beng Come Down Dub
                          6 Rasta Congo Dub
                          7 Some A Dub
                          8 Citizen Dub
                          9 Watch & Pray Dub
                          10 King Rastafari Dub
                          11 Take It To Dub
                          12 Heaven Dub
                          13 Grandma Say Dub*
                          14 Start A New Dub*
                          15 Rasta Weh She Dub*
                          *CDBONUS TRACKS

                          Bunny Lee

                          Creation Of Dub

                            King Tubby and Producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee are intertwined in the birth of dub music. Tubby’s vast knowledge of electronics and Bunny’s vast catalogue of rhythms would lay the foundations of what today is taken as a standard; remix or version cuts to an existing vocal tune. The pairs work together is celebrated on "Creation Of Dub", another landmark album from the Tubby-Lee reggae axis. If you loved Jamaican Recordings King Tubby reissue LPs, then this should be on your shopping list too!


                            Bunny Lee & King Tubby Present Tommy McCook & The Aggrovators

                            Brass Rockers

                              King Tubby and Producer Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee are intertwined in the birth of Dub Music. After discovering a mistake that made a ‘serious joke’ they went on to release the first pressings of this new musical genre namely ‘Dub Music’. Tubby’s vast knowledge of electronics and Bunny’s vast catalogue of rhythms would lay the foundations of what today is taken as a standard...the Remix / Version cuts to an existing vocal tune. Sit back and enjoy this historic set of sounds. These releases were the first to carry the name of King Tubby and the first to credit the great musicians that contributed so much to the rhythms that made these albums possible.


                              Cornell Campbell

                              The Gorgon Dubwise

                                Cornell Campbell is one of the great voices in Jamaican music, with a career going all the way back to 1959 with hits for Coxsone Dodd's Studio One label, and recording as part of vocal harmony trio The Uniques in the late 60s. Going solo in the early 70s he had a fruitful partnership with producer Bunny 'Striker' Lee, coming up with a series of killer tracks. In the mid 70s he began working with Channel One house band The Aggrovators, who re-cut many of these early 70s hits, remaking them in a tougher, rasta / roots style. It is from these sessions that the dub cuts on "The Gorgon Dubwise" are culled. Featuring the classic line-up of Carlton 'Santa' Davis, Carlton and Aston 'Family Man' Barrett, Robbie Shakespeare, Earl 'Chinna' Smith, Tony Chin, Winston 'Bo Peep', Ansel Collins, Bobby Ellis, Vin Gordon, Tommy McCook and Lennox Brown, these tracks really are at the top of the 70s reggae sound.


                                Latest Pre-Sales

                                189 NEW ITEMS

                                E-newsletter —
                                Sign up
                                Back to top