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MUSIC FROM MEMORY

In the lead up to part two of the highly anticipated Outro Tempo compilation, MFM drops this teaser EP with the never before heard cassette madness of São Paulo’s Bruhahá Babélico and Individual Industry’s ethereal electro pop on the flip.

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Music From Memory announces a series of Brazilian releases for this Spring that pick up where their 2017 Outro Tempo compilation left off. Circling around the musical projects that emerged out of the art world in Brazilian cities during the late 1980s and 1990s, “Outro Tempo II: Electronic and Contemporary Music from Brazil, 1984-1996” takes anotherdive into the depths of the Brazilian underworld, exploring the rhythms that lurk beneath the Ipanema sunset. It shines light on more illustrious unknowns and on the genre-defying music that maintained asymbiotic, yet uneasy, relationship with mainstream popular culture.

Spanish ambient composer Suso Saiz deepens his relationship with Music From Memory with the release of a new album, "Nothing Is Objective". This joins 2017’s "Rainworks" as his second full-length album for the label, following archival collections of solo music and of his group Orquesta De Las Nubes. Nothing Is Objective was recorded in Madrid in 2018 during a period of transcendental change and creative awakening for Suso. It captures the composer as he develops a renewed relationship with his instruments and craft, channeling a dialogue between the meticulous use of technology and the outer reaches of human expression. Suso’s universe is one that remains in constant mutation and emphasizes time above all else. His radiant drones are a nest of hidden feelings; they glisten with complex emotions and textures, teasing out moods of vulnerability and hope. Nothing Is Objective is a delicate and intimate record that harnesses smalls drops of sentiment for listeners to withdraw into. Released in a gatefold 2xLP it features collaborations with Austrian guitarist Christian Fennesz, liner notes by John Gómez, and music dedicated to Suso’s friend, the late Mexican musician Jorge Reyes. Nothing Is Objective cements Suso’s place as one of the label’s central and most loved artists.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Suso Saiz delivers his second full length LP for Amsterdam's Music From Memory, drawing us further into his immersive sonic landscape. Cloudlike pads, crystalline chimes and digital stimulus permeate the air throughout, not least on the Fennesz collaboration "Dulce".

Music From Memory are back with more essential action on the archival tip, this time combining the ultimate techno-tropical tonker from Curt Cress with the finest dancers from his most celebrated solo LP "Avanti" - providing those with a thirst for the deeper dancefloor experience with the best of Cress in one easy place.
Prolific as a percussionist and producer, Curt Cress came to fame during the 70s, lending his rhythms to a who's who of German prog groups, jazz rockers, fusionists and popstars, before finally stepping out on his own with the "Avanti" LP in 1983. Inspired by his time with the fusion groups, the burgeoning NDW scene and cutting edge synths, Cress swept through backbeats, breakbeats, syncopation and solos, providing melodic intricacy via tumbling mallets and otherworldly electronics. The three tracks which make up the B-side on this retrospective 12" all appear on the second side of "Avanti", and give an instant impression of the impact, accomplishment and ambiance of the LP. "Sundance" sprints through syncopated hits, tumbling talking drums, ace electronic passages and a hypnotic mallet refrain made for dancing feet. Taking a tougher approach, "Power Vein" thumps out the toms, rock snares and white noise hats in true mechanical funk fashion before "Flying HIgh" offers us dreamy Asiatic melodies, bouncing Linn idents and an intricate, ever changing web of pure percussive joy - a true dancers' delight.
From a DJ's point of view, all this was just foreplay ahead of Curt's '92 12" "Dschung Tek", pulled from a point in his career when the veteran drummer was experimenting with techno and tribal house, with the confidence to have a little fun. Played with passion by Ruf Dug, Talking Drums, Basso and Bufiman over the past half decade, "Dschung Tek" takes us on a trip through the undergrowth, pairing warped synthetic metal hits, a pounding beat and all sorts of tropical tropes (birdsong, cicadas, crickets) with a gurgling sequence a bit like an army of ants chomping their way through a DX7. Add in an elephant trumpet, ace pads and a break with a fly swatter and you're having the time of your life.


STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: My favourite and most played dance record ever, and the essential Talking Drums track! Play "Dschung Tek" loud enough and you'll actual land in Jumanji! If that weren't enough to have you buzzing harder than an irate mosquito, the flip pulls three of the best tracks off Curt's excellent "Avanti EP" and gives them a fresh pressing for club use. Top!

Music From Memory’s final 12" for 2017 is a reissue of Dub Oven's self released, and sadly one-off, 1983 EP 'Skin N Bones’.
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Pioneers in the Post Punk Industrial and New Wave scene in 1980’s San Francisco, Gary Miles (Voice Farm) and Blaise Smith (Minimal Man), met at San Francisco’s notorious 181 Club in December of 1982. This straight/same sex/swing-both-ways late night dive bar was tucked away in one of the city's most risky, drug riddled neighbourhoods. Stationed near the SF Museum of modern Art it attracted a wild audience of local patrons, aspiring young artists and music heads. In the thick of all this the duo felt impartial to a lot what was going on musically and set out to produce electronic music that could break through the "somewhat exhausted post disco sound that was then competing in the local San Francisco clubs". Enlisting soul vocalist Celeste Miller, the duo were also inspired by Lee 'Scratch' Perry / Upsetters dub tracks being produced in Jamaica and created a unique breed of avant guard hybrid New Wave/Electronic Funk.

With its influences seemingly as much rooted in the past and the present as it was focused on the future; Dub Oven formed a distinct, mystical approach to music intended for the dance floor. All three tracks on this 12" embody a signature groove and an inventive synthesized abstraction to express a languishing urban unsettledness and spiritual awareness. Recorded at L7 Studios in San Francisco with the assistance of the the studio’s in house producer Marco Perry (who currently now works with Bjork) the record was unfortunately overlooked by A&R at several major and even local labels and was finally self-released in very limited quantities. Utilising analog electronics and instrumentation, the record draws on elements of dub, new wave, soul and funk to create a sound that is uncategorizable and one that was perhaps simply too forward thinking for its time. 

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: MFM cap off an excellent year in their 12" series with this bonkers bit of dubby/new wave from 80s Frisco. There's a wonderfully weird bedroom B52s vibe to these three tracks, which are currently causing all manner of excitement amongst the Piccadilly staff.

Music From Memory switch formats to the Maxi 12" here, hitting us with a proper cross genre gem dug out by the one and only Satoshi Yamamura. Originally released on a 7" at some stage in the 80s, "Amerikan Dread" is a super sweet reggae-disco synth pop hybrid, packing Hollywood Hills lyricism, boogie vocoder and post Paisley funk into a total unclassic. The A-side of this remastered 12" hits us with the vocal and dub versions from the original release, leaving the whole of the B-side for a pair of primo re-visions from two leaders of the new school. First up, Russian tape lunatic Lipelis does his usual freaky shit on a neat retouch, while Androo licks the chalice and soaks the whole thing in bong water. Peace!

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Mega NYC disco-dub fusion here, rediscovered and reissued by Amsterdam's finest. Glistening with synth pop sparkle, the OG and dub should kill it for the DKMNTL crowd, while Lipelis' tapey redux and Androo's THC laced excursion are A-grade weirdshit!

Music From Memory’s latest release sees the reissue of G.B. Beckers' 'Walkman' album from 1982.
A painter and musician from Aachen, Germany, Günther Beckers created his third album ’Walkman' to coincide with an exhibition of his latest body of artwork in 1982. Released on his very own 'Milky Music' label with a run of just 500 copies and original pieces of artwork included with some copies, most copies of the album however remained amongst art collectors and with the painter himself. Rediscovered a few years ago through a friend of Music From Memory in the archives of a local radio station where all but one of the stations copies had been destroyed, it has been an album the label have been in love with since the first listen.
Touring as a guitarist with ECM affiliated Jazz musicians such as Alex De Grassi, William Ackerman, Ralph Towner & Larry Coryell to name but a few, Günther Beckers also would record on a number of releases of Klaus Schulze’s cult electronic music label ‘Innovative Communication’.
Always exploring new ideas and the possibilities of technology within his music, Günther would record the ‘Walkman’ album utilising the ‘Kunstkopf’ technique of sound recording. Kunstkopf or ‘Dummy Head’ recording is a 3D audio recording technology that enables listeners to define each source of sound as if they were in the original recording situation itself. Using two microphones which are usually mounted in the ears of a mannequin (giving it the ‘Dummy Head’ name in English) the technique exploits certain basic principles of human spatial hearing.
Listeners to ‘Kunstkopf’ recordings are in fact encouraged to listen to such recordings on headphones, as the 3D perception is often greatly diminished on speakers. With the title ‘Walkman’ G.B. Beckers was very much hoping the album would be enjoyed on headphones, even portably through a Walkman. Minimalist variations around an acoustic guitar, guitar synth, rhythm box and with wordless female vocals, G.B. Beckers' 'Walkman' drifts in and out of moods; it is a unique and at times hauntingly beautiful album, which the Kunstkopf recording technique further adds to the albums at times often otherworldly feeling.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Music From Memory visit the evocative sounds of Gunther Beckers for their new release, bringing us a ten track excursion into rainsoaked windows, introspective guitar and bedroom beauty. Folk-meets-Balearic with a twist of ambience...

Amsterdam's archival experts Music From Memory are back with more ‘Music From The Living Room’. Delving further into the archives of British musician Michal Turtle, "Return To Jeka" brings together eight previously unreleased works recorded between 1983 and 1985. Drawn from a larger archive of works the compilation highlights a fascinating period of material Michal recorded after the release of his only album.
Working as an accompanist musician at The Laban Centre in New Cross at the time, Michal there met Jonathan Smart who was currently studying Dance. After being invited to add spoken word vocals to a few of Michal’s tracks, Michal discovered Jonathan was also an accomplished guitarist; and Jonathan would add guitar to a number of recordings from this period. Vocalist Lucianne Lassalle who Michal was working with in local bands ‘The Duplicates’ and ‘The Wicked Kitchen Staff’ and who had worked with Michal on recordings for his album, would also collaborate with Michal again during this period.
While some tracks were produced with the idea in mind of a follow up to his album ‘Music From The Living Room’ which UK label Shout proposed but which would sadly not materialise, others were in fact demos written for student dance choreographies. Produced in the living room of his parents' home in Croydon, South London and later in his apartment in Camden Town, Michal Turtle’s home recordings featured on ‘Return To Jeka’ continue his unique musical explorations; drawing extensively on the use of percussion and electronics they bring together elements which were not only in many aspects visionary but also sound like little else.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Drifting between dream and nightmare, Michal Turtle's otherworldly electronic suites beguile, bewitch and transport you to another place entirely.

Denis Mpunga & Paul K

Criola Remixed - Inc. Prins Emanuel/ Dazion / Androo / Tolouse Low Trax / Interstellar Funk Remixes

Music From Memory continue to cook up the heaters here, beaming onto your deck with a remix disc inspired by that curious and crucial Afro-Belgian LP. The odd combination of electronic elements, rubberised grooves and the sunbaked flavours of the mother continent took us all by surprise when it dropped a couple of months back - bounding out the speaker like a long, lost twin of Zazou, Biyake & CY1 with just a little extra oddball rating. Now the dons of the 'dam invite a veritable who's who of contemporary production druids to work their body moving magic on a bunch of "Criola" originals. Swedish drum fiend Prins Emanuel kicks us off with a suitably percussive reinterpretation of "KWEI!!", cycling through chanted vocals and pinging synths over an irresistible blend of circular rhythm elements and breezy bass. Next up Holland's afro-cosmic wunderkind comes up to the plate with a "Turtle Maraca" remix of "Intermezzo B" perfect for a memorable night of chicken limbo and lysergic marinade. Picking up where he left off on "Rigola", Dazion stretches the OG into a proper cosmic roller, surrounding the psychedelic flute refrain with shamanic drums, hypnotic sequences and a deep and earthy kick drum. Second Circle's most recent recruit, Androo continues his fine run of early form with an astrally inclined kosmische mix dripping in otherworldly dub elements. The slow and sensual drum pattern holds it down from top to bottom, creating more than enough space for echo drenched guitars, delicate mallets and smooth synths to enjoy an ear pleasing threesome. Flipping the disc we're dropped into the dark and sticky domain Detlef calls home, coming face to face with a transportative Tolouse Low Trax mix of "Veronika". Slicing and dicing the emotive vocals and soft-goth guitars over a typically lopsided groove, the German makes us move...slowly. Mechanical, packed with soul and slow enough to lock your shoulders into a right good roll, it's another eyeball licking masterpiece from Dusseldorf. As we reach the B2 we take a break from the remixes in favour of an unreleased version of "Veronika 02" with about 4 tons of extra electronic bass banged under it - holy heft it's muscular. Finally, Dutch electro chief Interstellar Funk delivers a slow moving sci-fi rendition of "Intermezzo 2" which drifts through the deadzone dodging growling synth stabs and static space junk to the tripped out patter of a rippling rhythm track.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: MFM revisit the madcapped magic of "Criola" with a star studded remix package perfect for the more open minded dancefloors of the world. Dig in for Afro-cosmic strollers, deep space rollers, mechanical soul and subbed up dub. A perfect accompaniment to the original, with more than enough retweak to turn the dancefloor inside out.

"Uneven Paths: Deviant Pop From Europe, 1980-1991" is the second multiple artist compilation on Music From Memory and is compiled by record connoisseur Raphael Top-Secret and label man Jamie Tiller. The compilation brings together twenty one tracks from across the continent; exploring the more unusual and unexpected sides of Pop music produced during that period.

Drawing material from cult experimental artists such as Steve Beresford, Brenda Ray and Bill Nelson alongside one-off independent musical projects rescued from the fringes, ’Uneven Paths’ focuses on a selection of tracks that go beyond the confines of mainstream pop music but which also transcend expectations of much of the ’experimental’ music of the time. This is music with one foot in the avant-garde and another foot firmly rooted within the sensibilities of Pop; where Jazz musicians detour into Synth-Pop, Punk bands break into Boogie jams, and student doctors jam out on odd melodies with synthesizers and drum machines during their night shifts.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Previous Music From Memory releases have seen the imprint explore the esoteric fringe of electronica, Brazilian synth wave and art-school ambient with the same exhaustive research and inspired selections. Now the Dutch label turn their attention to the underappreciated talent at the heart of Europe's outsider pop movement. There are too many tunes here to mention, and most are new to me, but I have to shout out Brenda & The Beachballs, Miko & Mubare and Violet Eves as favourites.

For their first multi-artist compilation, Music From Memory take us on a trip to the heart of the Amazon rainforest. "Outro Tempo: Electronic and Contemporary Music From Brazil, 1978-1992" is a double LP that explores the outer reaches of Brazilian music, where indigenous rhythms mix with synthesizers and where MPB mingles with drum computers. As Brazil faced the last years of its military dictatorship and transition to democracy, a generation of forward-thinking musicians developed an alternative vision of Brazilian music and culture. They embraced traditionally shunned electronic production methods and infused their music with elements of ambient, jazz-fusion, and minimalism. At the same time they referenced the musical forms and spirituality of indigenous tribes from the Amazon. The music they produced was a complex and mesmerising tapestry that vividly evoked Brazilian landscapes and simultaneously reached out to the world beyond its borders. The product of extensive research, this compilation is a unique introduction to this visionary music and features many fresh discoveries in a country well trodden by record diggers. It gathers tracks from obscure albums that have for too long been neglected by even the most avid collectors of Brazilian music. It includes now highly sought after music by Andréa Daltro, Maria Rita, and Fernando Falcão, as well as unknown gems like those of Cinema, Carlinhos Santos, and Anno Luz. This is an essential release that reveals a broader spectrum of Brazilian music, striking a unique sonic signature that is full of innovation, experimentation, and beauty. Compiled by John Gómez and featuring extensive liner notes, Outro Tempo showcases this overlooked corner in Brazil’s rich music history for the first time.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: How do they keep on doing it? MFM deliver another vital release here, mining a rich and rare scene of Brazilian electronics to expand minds and move bodies in the most unconventional way. Proper froglicking tackle from back in the day!

After chilling us out with last year’s Suso Saiz retrospective, Music From Memory mark their 20th release in gleeful style with an album of new works by the Spanish electronic music pioneer. Recorded in Madrid between January and February 2016, this is Suso Saiz’s first release of new music in nearly 10 years. Titled "Rainworks" this double LP release was originally part of a commission from a Canary Islands water company. The first ideas for the compositions developed from a documentary that Suso had seen suggesting the possibility of water molecules having their own ‘memory’. As Suso himself explains, he became fascinated with the “possibility of an eternal being, changing its cyclical condition from solid to gaseous state, travelling through and between the Earth and the Sky, as a witness and keeper of the true history of Earth and Mankind”. Suso, his son Emil Saiz and pianist Raph Killhertz set out to explore this metaphysical process of cyclical movement through music in "Rainworks". Developing from the original commissioned tracks into a much more elaborate project, the album’s process became something of a mystical journey, drawing on aspects of minimalism and modernism. The music is also embedded in textured natural soundscapes and spoken word passages which were recorded and processed by Suso himself. Despite having the immediacy of an improvised piece, "Rainworks" was entirely composed by Suso. Though it appears at first inspection to be electronic album, if you dig a little deeper you'll find plenty of acoustic elements to the recording. A resonant piano (a grand piano re-amplified using its resonant box and harp to generate effects) as well as guitars (with simple effects) are played in Suso’s inimitable hypnotic way, slowly drawing the listener into a transportive state or lucid dream. 

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: I loved the MFM collection of archival records from last year, so I was a right giddy kipper when I saw there was soon to be brand new material. As they say, class is permanent and Saiz' first release in ten years is every bit as good as his old compositions. Immersive, aquatic and in places experimental, "Rainworks" first challenges, then rewards. Check out the stunning "The Way Of Water" if you need a little beauty in your life!

Music From Memory's final compilation of 2017 sees the release of the double album “1 by 1”, which brings together the works of American experimental musician Geoffrey Landers. During a period spanning from 1979 to 1987, this Denver, Colorado based multi-instrumentalist, composer, record producer and engineer, conceived several solo albums. Only two of these, “The Ever Decimal Pulse” and “Habitual Features” along with the single “Breedlove” were ever released on vinyl.
Heavily involved in the local industrial/punk/new wave scene and wanting to create a recording studio “available to record artists regardless of their financial circumstances” Landers set up “The Packing House Studio” in 1981. This analog 8-track recording facility was located in a former slaughterhouse in the stockyards of Denver and was a place of significant activity for the next three years with the studio releasing recordings from numerous artists most notably Allen Ginsberg.
It was here that Geoffrey Landers also started his own aptly named “Cauhaus” label. Indicative of the underground/DIYculture, “Cauhaus” was a subsiduary of a label called Local Anaesthetics which was started as an in-store label by independent Denver record store Wax Trax. Typically Cauhaus releases were only pressed up in small quantities and independently distributed, making Lander's music essentially elusive to a wide audience. After relocating in 1984 to an art district of Denver Landers opened the “Cauhaus Institute of Recording” studio where he continued to produce music for soundtracks, art and multi media projects for the next three years, after which Landers stepped out of the music industry entirely. He currently creates and exhibits mixed-media glass art.
Throughout the twenty tracks of "1 by 1", of which six previously appeared on CD only, we are submerged into a wide diversity of musical approaches from Geoffrey Landers. From the proto-house track “Logarhythms” and the heart breaking New-Wave Boogie/Funk of “Say You’ll Say So” to the more contemplative pieces such as the oriental insprired “Nisei” and the drenched in sunshine dub/reggae track “Mack” Landers shies away from musical expectations again and again; searching continually for innovative and new forms of expression.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: MFM’s latest retrospective brings together the anything goes weird-wave brilliance of Geoffrey Landers. Impossible to find in the wild, Landers’ work incorporates alt-boogie, proto house, ambient, dub and new age.

Music From Memory return with their penultimate EP of 2017, this time with four tracks drawn from Virgil ‘Vincent’ Work Jnr’s little-known cassette only debut from 1987, ‘Fast Forward’. Following on from a previous compilation of works taken from one of Virgil’s collaborative projects as the duo ‘Workdub’, this album under simply ‘Vincent’, reflects a more stripped back and raw musical approach from the St. Louis musician.
Experimenting with rhythm programming, midi, layering, sequencing, digital effects and sound synthesis the ‘Fast Forward’ sessions grew out of a series of late night jams with Vincent’s brother Scott who was then living in Kansas. With nothing planned in advance and no written music involved in the final recording sessions, the songs that would form ‘Fast Forward’ very much evolved out of improvisation lending a unique often spatial and searching quality to the tracks. Virgil’s equipment at the time very much lead the experimentation with the album being produced on a Yamaha DX7 Synthesizer, Korg DW-8000 Synthesizer, Yamaha RX-15 Drum Machine, Korg SQD-1 Sequencer and a sequential TOM Drum machine. As Virgil himself explains the title of the album in fact came about because it felt “as if I had fast forwarded to a different sound”.
Bedroom produced, the "Fast Forward" album had an initial run of only 100 copies, of which none were commercially available and were simply sent to friends and family along with a handful mailed out to local radio stations in his hometown of St Louis. Although the album received a good response from local radio DJs and music magazines, the album sadly never gained enough momentum or demand for a further run of copies. Fast forward to 2017, exactly thirty years are their production, and Music From Memory are delighted to be able to finally make Vincent’s music commercially available again."

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Spangled and sparkling, these four propulsive, percussive synth jams dance right at the fringe of the proto-house dancefloor. Playful, naive and largely unplanned, these charming future primitive shake-downs should sit comfortably next to your favourite jams from Young Marco, Andras Fox or local hero Ruf Dug. Ace!

Joel Graham

Geomancy / Night

After wowwing us with the experminetal synthesis of their Vito Ricci retrospective last time out, Music From Memory continue their journey through obscure 80s electronics with this two tracker from the suitably low key Joel Graham. Prompted by a chance cassette discovery by Red Light Radio founder and label associate Orpheu de Jong, this two track 12” highlights the work of electronic music pioneer Joel Graham, a San Francisco based artist who self released two cassettes in 1984 / 85. Originally recorded and performed live on pre-MIDI analogue equipment in 1982 as an outline for a live performance, these visionary tracks provoke much of the same sensibilities found in both contemporary dance music as well as in works of more established vanguard artists of the time. Slowly unravelling and deeply hypnotic, Joel Graham’s music seems to manifest a doorway to a profound new world and can be seen as a forerunner of what was to come in electronic music. A-side cut "Geomancy" powers up gradually, first lulling us into a concentric cycle of drum box rhythm and blinking LEDs before blooming into a full frequency embrace of glacial synths. On the flipside, "Night" plunges us into the depths of a murky proto-techno ocean where propulsive bass sequences brush aside melodic synth shoals on the way to the subaquatic crystal realms beyond. Hats off to Amsterdam's finest once again - mindblowing time machine shit here!

Vito Ricci

I Was Crossing A Bridge

    For their fifth excursion into the lesser thumbed pages of the great musical story, Music From Memory present a collection of works from a man close to the label's heart. Operating at the leading edge of NYC's underground music scene, Vito Ricci produced only a handful of self-released cassettes and one LP (titled "Music From Memory", wouldn't you know) between 1983 and 1985, with most of his work being recorded for experimental theatre and performance art pieces. Starting out as a percussionist, Ricci’s early musical journey led him to improvised and experimental jazz; working alongside such luminary musicians as Rashied Ali, Byard Lancaster, Peter Zummo and Yousef Yancey. Quickly becoming involved in the avant-­garde scene with spoken word performances, film scores for independent movies and even playing in punk bands with performances at venues such as CBGB’s and Mudd Club, Vito’s own compositions drew on all of these influences whilst channeling them through his experiments with synthesizers and drum computers. Drawing comparisons with New York’s downtown no-wave scene Vito’s compositions blend his unique use of intricate percussion with a wide sphere of musical influences to create a world of hypnotising ambient, meditative and minimal synthwave through to dubbed out electronic funk and even leftfield boogie. "I Was Crossing A Bridge" unveils Vito Ricci's unique and visionary take on electronic music, most of which was previously unreleased.


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    Thanks for posting about it. It’s here until next Friday May 3rd btw. https://t.co/PgaFhSvpPe
    Wed 24th - 8:58
    Yes! Thanks @NME for the feature. Come and visit @ianbrown https://t.co/ilKYdZmAtx
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    It’s great isn’t it?! Glad you liked it and hope your wish comes true.🤞🏻 https://t.co/ZPlM8ry6f5
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