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Howlin' Wolf

Message To The Young

    1971 marked a tumultuous yet historic year for Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf. His health failing after suffering a second heart attack, doctor’s discovered his kidneys were also shutting down and he was ordered on dialysis to save his life. Wolf's doctors demanded that the legend quit performing at all costs, but the legendary blues musician did not have any quit in him. Three months after being ordered never to perform again he was headlining opening night at the Ann Arbor Blues Festival. 1971 also marked the release of Howlin’ Wolf’s second experimental offering, “Message To The Young”. Oft-considered his second attempt (after the “Howlin’ Wolf Album” he famously shunned) at offering the masses a “psychedelic” record, the sound on the record ranges from acid-rock, to blues, to funk, and back again. The title track on “Message To The Young” is exactly what the title suggests; Wolf’s attempt at reaching the youth of the era in a beautiful spoken word ballad which can easily be summed up in two words “Be Yourself”. Get On Down’s reputation for high quality reissues continues with Message to the Young, originally released on the newly formed Chess Grt label, a subsidiary of legendary imprint Chess Records. This all new Get On Down version features audio painstakingly remastered from the original master recordings for a true high definition sound experience.

    Impossibles

    Hot Pepper

      The rise to fame of the talented Impossibles is one which will never be described as such. Historically regarded as a legendary and iconic 70s era string-pop band in their native land of Thailand, the Impossibles became well known internationally for their covers of Western rock songs. Having become nationally recognized in 1970 after winning the Thai Musicians Award for best professional band in the country (an award they would win the next two years), the Impossibles knew that they could ride their wave of success to international heights. In 1972 they left Thailand for an engagement in Honolulu, Hawaii – the one off gig turned into a year long string of performances, followed by a seventh month European tour - a move which raised the stature of the Impossibles to international fame. In 1975, the Impossibles became the first band in the history of Thailand to sign a recording contract with an international firm (Phonogram). “Hot Pepper” - an all English language recording, was also the first such album recorded overseas by a Thai pop group. In addition to rock and pop, the band's sound frequently crossed over into funk, R&B, country and folk. Two covers of Kool and the Gang tracks ("Give It Up" and Love The Life You Live") appear on their heralded 1975 album “Hot Pepper”. Get On Down is proud to present The Impossibles 1975 album “Hot Pepper” featuring audio completely remastered from the original audio tapes.

      Clipse

      Hell Hath No Fury - White Vinyl Edition

        In the 4 years after The Clipse dropped their sophomore classic Lord Willin' the duo was able to build a legacy that had fans hungry for new material. After the smoke cleared and they hit the studio the Virginia brothers recorded the confidently mature sophomore effort, Hell Hath No Fury. Best known for their unconventional radio smash "Grindin'," Clipse are no strangers to taking risks with the boundary-pushing Neptunes, who return as trusted co-pilots for Hell Hath No Fury. As always the duo is right at home over The Neptunes crafted beats which perfectly embrace Pusha's inventive drug-game metaphors and Malice's soul-baring confessionals.

        From the bouncy lead single "Mr. Me Too" and the Slim Thug assisted "Wamp Wamp" to the oddly haunting "Keys Open Doors" to "Momma I'm Sorry", Hell Hath No Fury represents some of the duo's best work. On the hypnotic "Keys Open Doors," over the eerie mix of screwed-up angelic voices, chimes and congas, the brothers run circles around the competition, while the spine-tingling boom-bap of "Ride Around Shining" sets the stage for Pusha's hilarious boasts. Whether rhyming over distorted, lo-fi guitar plucks ("Dirty Money") or overblown 808s ("Trill"), the brothers come with colorful references and inventive word play that easily places them in a lyrical class of their own. Get On Down now proudly issues this Neptunes produced favorite on LP for the first time ever with the first run on white vinyl.

        Busta Rhymes

        When Disaster Strikes

          Repressed for the first time in years. Note new price. By the time Busta Rhymes hit with his second solo album, “When Disaster Strikes”, he was already cemented as one of the most powerful voices in the rap game. With a lead single that countered that statement “Put Your Hands Where MY Eyes Can See” he proved he is more than just a one act man. The single was an immediate smash and was followed by an equally amazing album. The albums second single “Dangerous” continued to push Busta creatively and was accompanied with a stellar video gained him major air play on BET and MTV.

          Critics and fans alike applauded this release for its depth and well-crafted songs which made it platinum at the time of its release. Songs like “Turn UP” the Flipmode assisted "We Could Take it Outside" and “Rhymes Galore” showcase Busta at his best; rapid fire delivery over hard pounding beats. Other stand out cuts include "So Hardcore" and “One” which is a great collaboration with Erykah Badu. On the production side Busta brings along his trusted team; Rashad Smith, Dilla, Rockwilder and DJ Scratch to serve him just what he needed for “When Disaster Strikes” to be full on dope! 

          Dillinger

          CB 200

            THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2019 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

            First issued in 1976. Available on CD and digital but vinyl has been out of print since the mid-80s. 2000 only worldwide. By the 1970s Reggae had spread from Jamaica and become an international phenomena. Enter Dillinger, who rose up with the El Paso Sound System as part of the second generation of Jamaican toasters. His name came from American gangster John Dillinger at the suggestion of none other than Lee Perry (who produced his first album). A deal with Island Records followed, with sessions happening at Channel One Studios with Joseph ""Jo Jo"" Hoo Kim producing. Recording at Channel One in mid-70s meant Dillinger and Jo Jo were tapping into an immense talent pool in the form of The Revolutionaries, the studio’s in-house band. CB 200 features contributions from Earl “Chinna” Smith, Aston “Family Man” Barrett, Ansel Collins, Sly Dunbar, and Tommy McCook among others. The release also brought forth the career defining cut “Cokane In My Brain”, a hit record on an international basis. Despite the success of CB 200 and “Cokane In My Brain” the release has remained out of print in all formats since the mid-1980s. Get On Down is about to change that, with their Record Store Day 2019 reissue of this too often overlooked Reggae masterpiece. Tracks : 1. CB 200 2. No Chuck It 3. Cokane In My Brain 4. The General 5. Power Bank 6. Plantation Heights 7. Race Day 8. Natty Kick Like Lightning 9. Buckingham Palace 10. Crankface

            Lee Scratch Perry & The Upsetters

            Jungle Lion / Freak Out Skank

            7” singles were instrumental to the development of the Jamaican music industry, more affordable than full lengths for the consumer, they also allowed the labels to turnaround what was being recorded into music played from their booming sound systems as quickly as possible. In that spirit, Get On Down will be reissuing some of the most crucial reggae and ska sides on 45. This time out we revisit a single Lee Perry first issued right after his fabled Black Ark Studio was first up and running. On the A-Side you know you’ve got something special when a cut kicks off with Lee Perry growling like a lion, borrowing heavily from Al Green’s “Love And Happiness” for “Jungle Lion.” On the B-Side Perry lets The Upsetters do the roaring with the cut being remixed into “Freak Out Skank.” First issued in 1973 on Perry’s own Justice League imprint with a UK issue following almost immediately, miss this and you’ll miss one of the most crucial developments in the sonic evolution of Scratch’s 1970s output.

            7” singles were instrumental to the development of the Jamaican music industry, more affordable than full lengths for the consumer, they also allowed the labels to turnaround what was being recorded into music played from their booming sound systems as quickly as possible. In that spirit, Get On Down will be reissuing some of the most crucial reggae and ska sides on 45. This time out Get On Down has collected two Bunny Lee produced masterpieces into a never before issued 45.

            On the A Side, King Tubby works his magic on The Aggrovators “A Noisy Place”, the instrumental version of John Holt & Horrace Andy’s classic cut “A Quiet Place.” Rather than drop “A Quite Place” into the mix, a second and more rare Tubby dub of the cut known as “A Ruffer Version” rounds out the single. The argument can be made that no one was more instrumental in the development of dub reggae than King Tubby, a statement even his friend and sometime rival Lee Perry would agree with (let's not forget Scientist! - ed).


            STAFF COMMENTS

            Patrick says: Utterly batshit, rasping redux of "A Quiet Place" from Tubby here, showcasing the full range of mixing desk insanity. Matt heard it yesterday and needed a day off today...

            Pete Rock & Cl Smooth

            The Main Ingredient

            We are the planters of the weeds or roses in our garden. Take the plunge within yourself to find The Main Ingredient.” So reads CL Smooth’s album dedication in the liners to Pete Rock & CL’s underrated, soulful and deeply grooving sophomore album. For fans, it was bittersweet, as it would be their last as a duo. By 1994, Pete and CL were darlings of both fans and critics, still on a high after 1992’s Mecca & The Soul Brother and the album’s emotional smash single “They Reminisce Over You (T.R.O.Y.).”

            Two years later, they had grown even more as men and artists. Gone was some of the righteous striving of their earlier work, replaced by mature – yet still righteous – wisdom. And a lot more love as well, bringing a larger female constituency into their fanbase. They were adults now, reveling in the plateau they had reached. The duo’s ‘90s swan song is a powerful double album that still resonates with Golden Era hip-hop fans: 16 cuts deep and full of intelligence, fire and warmth. Beats-per-minute-wise, the album mostly clocks at a comfortable strutting pace, bolstered by Pete Rock’s pioneering use of filtered basslines and a recently-hatched obsession with Rhodes piano. The new tracks filled speakers and headphones with soul, as CL continued to assert his lyrical prowess all throughout.

            The lead single, “I Got A Love,” is a perfect example of the group’s ‘94 steez: a super-catchy and respectful, but far-from-soft love track, suitable for any rap fan’s romantic needs. “Take You There” and “Carmel City” cover similar ground. Considering CL Smooth’s top-level brag rapper status, cuts like “I Get Physical,” “Get On The Mic” and “Check It Out” effectively reminded competitors not to test him. Pete also gets in the game on the mic several times on the album, acquitting himself nicely (and solo) on the cloudy day soul of “Escape,” alongside other cuts. Add more pensive lyrical forays like “All The Places,” “Searching,” and – perhaps the album’s sleeper cut – “It’s On You” and you have one of the more complete rap full-lengths of the mid-1990s. This isn’t surprising, considering the wonder twins-esque skills of Pete and CL. But it does make fans wonder what would have happened if they had stayed together longer. 

            FORMAT INFORMATION

            2xColoured LP Info: Clear vinyl.

            “All of a sudden, Jamaica awoke one morning and U-Roy was everywhere…” So read the original liner notes to this classic reggae LP, which originally hit in 1971 and washed over the island like a grooving tropical storm. U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the early 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called “toasting,” which in addition to bringing Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American vocal style also in its infancy: rapping.

            This full-length, his first after a string of singles (mostly on the Treasure Isle and other Duke Reid labels, run by the famed producer and studio owner), rolls like a crazy party where a wobbly, but talented, “master of ceremonies” grabs the mic and won’t let go. Speaking over and around songs that already have straight-ahead vocals on them, U-Roy shows the world why he is considered an iconoclast and trailblazer. In all honesty, there are few standouts on the album since they all run a similar course, and all are captivating in their own way. Modern listeners will especially note “Tide Is High,” originally by the Paragons (featuring dulcet-toned vocalist John Holt) and recorded later as a 1980 smash hit by Blondie.

            Each track here is a new adventure, and while U-Roy’s approach might take some getting used to, it will eventually capture your ears as it did the entire island of Jamaica in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Sit back, drop the needle, and enjoy. 

            The contemporary realm of hip hop music can be seen as polarized between two sides; mainstream versus underground, industry versus independent, at a base level boiled down to catchy sounds & infective hooks over higher quality lyrical content. These elements don’t need to be mutually exclusive, but these days it’s rare to find an act that can please all sides of the discussion. Clipse are one of the few groups that successfully and consistently caters to both sides of rap’s splintered psyche, simultaneously serving the scene with upbeat bangers that get the club poppin’ & subwoofers rattlin’ while crafting clever quotable compositions deserving of repeated headphone submersions. Though their preceding official albums "Lord Willin’" & "Hell Hath No Fury" made bigger splashes commercially, 2009’s "Til The Casket Drops" is surely no slouch, a gem which deserves to be revisited with fresh ears – good thing Get On Down has given it the proper treatment it deserves with its first-ever vinyl pressing!
            Clipse have always delighted in dualities, juxtapositions and contradictions, unabashedly celebrating the capitalistic lifestyle and the grind as the kings of ‘coke-rap’, while taking hard looks at society’s mores and those of their own individual journeys. We hear Malice’s eventual transition to No Malice taking form on this album as he found religion, warning others who might follow in his path on ‘Footsteps’: “don’t let my wrongs give you the right of way/ to emulate my past escaping the law’s grasp” while refusing to be pinned down in one lane: “it weights on my conscience and I hate conscious rap”. Meanwhile Pusha T continues his lyrical ascent into the King Push persona with bars like “pompous motherfucker, look what them jewels made me/ I’m only finding comfort in knowing you can’t replace me/ What a thing to say, but what am I to do/ I’m role-playing a conscious nigga and true is true/ Cocaine aside, all of the bloggers behooved/ My critics finally have a verse of mine to jerk off to” decisively on album opener “Freedom”.
            Since it dropped, the Clipse have stated that Casket… is their final album together while subsequently alluding to the possibility of an eventual reunion. Only time will tell, but until then it’s time to re-celebrate one of hip hop’s most dynamic duos by hearing "Til The Casket Drops" in a whole new light with its long-overdue, first time on vinyl pressing via Get On Down featuring all 13 original tracks on wax and cover art by the legendary KAWS! It’s kinda like a big deal…

            U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the early 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called “toasting,” which in addition to bringing Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American vocal style also in its infancy: rapping. Following up the RSD17 release of U-Roy’s classic "Dread In A Babylon", Trafficnow brings us a very welcome reissue of the vocalist’s 1976 full-length (and fourth) album, "Natty Rebel", which has been out of print for more than 30 years. Produced by Tony Robinson (known for his work with Big Youth, Lloyd Parks, the Gladiators and many more), the album’s 11 cuts range from bouncier and sometimes even disco-tinged grooves – “Have Mercy,” “Go There Natty” and the album lead-off, “Babylon Burning” – to the classic roots stepping that drew fans to the legendary Jamaican vocalist over his long career – including “So Jay Jah Say” and “Natty Kung Fu.” At its core, this is a deep journey into the heart of rasta living, spoken by one of Jamaica’s most underrated dub and roots legends, and it’s one of the strongest full-lengths in his expansive catalog. Whether you are experiencing U-Roy for the first time, or replacing your decades-old original LP, diving into this reissue of "Natty Rebel" is one hell of a way to spend an afternoon. Or, if you’re not careful, a week or two. 

            STAFF COMMENTS

            Patrick says: As you read this, there's every chance I'm tucking into breadfruit stew, rice an' pea and a side of fried plantain, my culinary experience enhanced no end by this U-Roy classic.

            Dr. Octagon

            Dr. Octagonecologyst

              Dan The Automator’s and Kool Keith’s famed collaboration from the mid-‘90s is celebrated with a 28-track set housed in a custom, octagonal box, with 5 unreleased songs (originals + remixes); original Pushead cover artwork; and 40 page liner notes booklet. By the mid-1990s, the rap game had been through a lot in its two decades of existence: Early-days scraping to get by and be heard; The advent of sampling; The rise of groups ranging from Run-DMC to the Wu-Tang Clan and the sprawl of Dr. Dre’s shadow from the West across the globe; and solo juggernauts ranging from MC Hammer to the Notorious B.I.G. Thankfully, though, with everything that the genre had been through, there was still a lot of room to grow. And in early 1996, a new indie duo appeared that won over a whole new international audience, from hard rocks to skate punks. That pair was Dr. Octagon: Dan “The Automator” Nakamura and Kool Keith [Thornton]. In some ways, the Dr. Octagon album is a solo release.

              But Keith wasn’t the only hand on deck. He brought along a young, New York-based MC with him: Sir Menelik. Menelik was featured on four album tracks, starting with “Dr. Octagon,” and proved to be an excellent super-scientifical, fast-rhyming foil to Keith. And there was one final featured contributor who helped add to the album’s next-level sound: San Francisco’s DJ Q*Bert, who cuts on half of the album’s songs. The album originally came out on The Automator’s Bulk Recordings label in early 1996, with cover art by metal and punk cult hero visual artist Pushead. Pressing numbers weren’t huge, but as the year went on, the buzz grew, and a slightly expanded version of the album was released on James Lavelle’s London-based Mo Wax label.

              Then Dan took an offer from newly-formed major label DreamWorks, to re-release the album with extra tracks in mid-1997. The new domestic pressing allowed for a bigger press push, as well as the group’s first and only video, for “Blue Flowers.” Beyond “Blue Flowers,” the album is chock-full of mind-bending tracks, like “Earth People”; the wacked-out but sincere love ballad “Girl Let Me Touch You”; the metal-tinged “I’m Destructive”; Q-Bert’s turntable workout “Bear Witness”; and, of course, freaky Keith skits like “Elective Surgery” and “General Hospital”. Dr. Octagonecologyst is one of the most unique rap records the genre has ever seen, and this is the perfect way to celebrate it – whether it’s the first time you have heard this mind-expanding record, or the three thousandth. 

              FORMAT INFORMATION

              3xLtd LP Info: 28-track set housed in a custom, octagonal box, with 5 unreleased songs (originals + remixes); original Pushead cover artwork; and 40 page liner notes booklet.

              Augustus Pablo

              This Is Augustus Pablo - Get On Down Edition

              Augustus Pablo (Horace Swaby) was born just outside of Kingston. “I am a Kingstonian,” he told the NME in 1986, “but my heart is for the hills.” This mystical connection to “the hills” is at the heart of Pablo's unique and immediately identifiable sound. By the late '60s, Swaby and his brother Dougie had founded a small sound system they called Rockers. The brothers spent a lot of time in record shops, including Aquarius, where owner Herman Chin-Loy heard Swaby experimenting on his melodica and was struck by the inspiration to record. The resulting tune was credited to Augustus Pablo, a name that Chin-Loy invented, as the story goes, to give an air of mystery to the release. Pablo recorded two more singles soon after with “Java” becoming a major hit and being voted Instrumental Song Of The Year by Jamaica's Swing Magazine. This success led to the Randy's label moving to create a full-length album from Pablo. Recording in the Randy's studio upstairs from the record shop “we weren't watching the clock...we had the studio,” Clive Chin recalled. The band included a cast of the greatest reggae musicians of all time: future Wailer Tyrone Downie on keyboards, Aston “Family Man” Barrett, “Fully” Fullwood and Lloyd Parks on the bass, Carlton Barrett, “Santa” Davis and Lloyd “Tin Leg” Adams were on drums and Earl “Chinna” Smith played guitar. In addition to these future Hall of Famers, the mixing board was helmed by Errol Thompson. Thompson and Chin would together pioneer a tough, new reggae sound that, Chin referred to as “Rockers” after the Swaby brothers' Rockers Hi-Fi sound system. 'This Is Augustus Pablo' is considered among the greatest collections of Jamaican instrumental music and is an essential part of reggae history. 

              Jurassic 5 flexed serious old-to-the-new muscles in the ‘90s, beginning with their independently released single “Unified Rebelution” in 1994, and book-ending with their stellar debut full-length: 2000’s Quality Control. They walked a tightrope between underground and mainstream hip-hop, and toured alongside rap peers as well as punk rockers on the Vans Warped Tour. With double the pleasure of your average hip-hop group – two DJs and producers (Cut Chemist and DJ Nu-Mark); and four MCs (Chali 2na, Akil, Marc 7 and Zaakir aka Soup) – they brought the late 1970s “unison MC” style of pioneering groups like the Fantastic 5 and the Force MCs to a new generation. Even more surprisingly, they did so out of Los Angeles, whose hip-hop flavors generally leaned towards Gangsta, G-Funk or Electro lines. Musically inventive and lyrically forward-thinking, each song on Quality Control is a new adventure, exploring engaging territory, delivered via one of the best live hip-hop shows fans had seen in years. From singles like the strutting groove of the title track to the throwback doo-wop samples on “The Influence” and the catchy, keyboard groove-driven “World of Entertainment (WOE Is Me),” to deeper album tracks like the lyrical gymnastics of “Jurass Finish First” and the thought-provoking “Lausd,” Jurassic 5 consistently stepped to the plate and their fans responded in kind, nearly pushing the album to Gold status. Add the innovative DJ-and-sample workout which closes out the album, “Swing Set,” and you have one of the 2000s’ most unique and solid full-length platters.

              By 1976, Lee "Scratch" Perry was well established at his Black Ark studio, a fact proven by the quality of the creations emerging from its walls. The success of Max Romeo's "War in a Babylon" brought a deal with Island Records and the possibility of greater financial rewards. The single was followed by a full-length album of the same name as well as deejay Jah Lion's Columbia Colly LP. Riding this crest of productivity, Scratch then turned to a creation of his own. Super Ape offered a series of the producer's finest 1976 rhythms, from Devon Irons' "When Jah Come" and the Blue Bells' "Come Along" to Romeo's "War in a Babylon" and "Chase the Devil." All are bathed in the distinct, murky atmosphere that was becoming a Black Ark trademark, then served up in the form of dub-like de-constructions. Island's UK / US sequencing of Super Ape places "Dread Lion" at the album's heart. If any track fulfills the cover's promise to "Dub it up, blacker than dread", this is it. Vocals from numerous cuts seem to compete for their spot on the rhythm, while a dizzying mix of horns, flute and melodica swirl around them. Punctuating the song's rock-solid underbelly, Perry conjures startling thunderclaps from his mixing board. Other Super Ape heavyweights include "Croaking Lizard" and "Zion's Blood": thick muscular constructs from the Upsetter session team. The former features an excellent Prince Jazzbo toast over the "Chase the Devil" rhythm, while the latter, a cut of "When Jah Come," draws its elusive meaning from vocal phrases courtesy of Heptones Earl Morgan and Barry Llewellyn. Super Ape is a dubwise, alternate universe to Perry's Black Ark vocal hits. It awaits anyone willing to heed its closing call: "This is the ape-man, trodding through creation, are you ready to step with I man?".

              Afrika Bambaataa & The Soul Sonic Force

              Planet Rock - Glow In The Dark Vinyl Edition

                Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force “Planet Rock” 12-inch re-issue on glow-in-the-dark vinyl (Limited edition of 1982 copies) B-Boy anthem from 1982 lights up any dancefloor…literally! First time ever on glow-in-the-dark vinyl! Fresh off Bambaataa’s historic donation of his vinyl collection to the Cornell University Hip-Hop Collection and the Fall 2014 “Renegades of Rhythm” tour by DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist celebrating his unparalleled contribution to hip-hop, Get On Down celebrates the song for which the Godfather of Hip-Hop is best known: 1982’s “Planet Rock,” a Kraftwerk-meets-Bronx-B-Boy anthem. Renowned the world over as a never-fail floor-filler, this new 12-inch pressing of the single is pressed on glow-in-the-dark vinyl for the first time ever. Although Bambaataa may have gotten top-billing on the release, it was a team effort, with crucial contributions by a team including DJ Jazzy Jay, Afrika Islam, Arthur Baker, John Robie, a Roland TR-808 drum machine (aka Planet Patrol) and of course MCs Mr. Biggs, G.L.O.B.E. and Pow Wow. This edition is housed in a clear, custom-embossed Get On Down poly-bag to let the glow show through.

                Eric B. & Rakim

                Paid In Full (Mini Madness: Coldcut Remix)

                  THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2014 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

                  Available from Get on Down, we are proud to bring back this rare 7”, the UK Picture sleeve release of Eric B & Rakim’s Paid in Full (Mini Madness – The Coldcut Remix). When Eric B & Rakim debuted with Paid in Full in the summer of ‘87 the album was an immediate classic. By the time the cut "Paid in Full" was released as the album's fifth and final single, it became a hit in clubs, radio and MTV largely due to the songs remix. Enter Coldcut, a new DJ/Remix team from the U.K who at the time just made a big splash with a record of their own, the cut & paste classic “Say Kids What Time Is It”. It made such a huge buzz that Julian Palmer from Island Records urged them to do a remix of “Paid in Full”. The result was the “Mini Madness” mix which turned Rakim's one verse song into a magnum opus that that crossed cultures and influences into one seamless remix. Today it still holds as one of the most groundbreaking remixes ever, Rakim himself is even quoted as saying it was the “best remix” he has ever heard. What made this remix so special was how Coldcut incorporated several new elements in producing their remix, mainly the use of vocal samples. The most prominent in these samples was the addition of Israeli singer Ofra Haza, whose voice when lowered in pitch, synced perfectly with the Paid in Full breakbeat. Another notable element of the Coldcut remix is its opening vocal sample, "This is a journey into sound” which even today it is recognizable as the start of this Remix. "Now wait a minute, you better talk to my mother" comes from Humphrey Bogart and lines like "Pump up the volume" and "Dance to the record" are sampled from Eric B. & Rakim's own song "I Know You Got Soul". While there are many more vocal bits and breaks that go into what makes this remix so special, it’s better to let the music speak for itself.

                  Sly & The Family Stone

                  There's A Riot Goin' On - Gold Edition

                    This 24k audiophile gold disc reissue of Sly & The Family Stone’s classic There’s A Riot Goin' On is packaged in a deluxe box emblazoned with a unique embroidered flag cover and includes a 48 page hard cover book filled with photos and liner notes.

                    After 2 years in production the follow-up to Sly & The Family Stone’s 1969 smash Stand! was unveiled. Containing radio hits like “Family Affair,” “Runnin’ Away,” and “(You Caught Me) Smilin’,” it also (in true Sly fashion) dove deeper into a trippy sonic and lyrical universe exploring societal tensions (“Brave & Strong”) the motherland (“Thank You For Talkin’ To Me Africa”), personal relationships (“Just Like A Baby”) and artistic expression itself (“Poet”). The album reached #1 on both Pop and R&B charts and years later, was certified platinum, gaining tens of thousands of new fans with each passing year.

                    Sly definitively explained his concept for the cover art ‘I wanted the flag to truly represent people of all colors. I wanted suns instead of stars because stars to me imply searching, like you search for your star. And there are already too many stars in this world. But the sun, that’s something that is always there, looking right at you. Betsy Ross did the best she could with what she had. I thought I could do better.’”

                    That flag has been lovingly recreated by Get On Down, presented on the CD box cover as an actual embroidered fabric square to bring textureto an album which is already full to the brim with feeling. It’s a perfect way to pay tribute to one of the 20th century's musical geniuses a man who brought fans together during one of America's most turbulent eras.


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