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Howlin' Wolf

Message To The Young

    1971 marked a tumultuous yet historic year for Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf. His health failing after suffering a second heart attack, doctor’s discovered his kidneys were also shutting down and he was ordered on dialysis to save his life. Wolf's doctors demanded that the legend quit performing at all costs, but the legendary blues musician did not have any quit in him. Three months after being ordered never to perform again he was headlining opening night at the Ann Arbor Blues Festival. 1971 also marked the release of Howlin’ Wolf’s second experimental offering, “Message To The Young”. Oft-considered his second attempt (after the “Howlin’ Wolf Album” he famously shunned) at offering the masses a “psychedelic” record, the sound on the record ranges from acid-rock, to blues, to funk, and back again. The title track on “Message To The Young” is exactly what the title suggests; Wolf’s attempt at reaching the youth of the era in a beautiful spoken word ballad which can easily be summed up in two words “Be Yourself”. Get On Down’s reputation for high quality reissues continues with Message to the Young, originally released on the newly formed Chess Grt label, a subsidiary of legendary imprint Chess Records. This all new Get On Down version features audio painstakingly remastered from the original master recordings for a true high definition sound experience.

    Slick Rick

    The Great Adventures Of Slick Rick

      Storytelling has been a part of the hip-hop lexicon since the artform’s earliest days. And in all those decades, there has never been a taleweaver like Slick Rick. Even masters who came along in Rick’s wake – ranging from Will Smith to Ghostface Killah and Eminem – know that even though they blazed their own paths, they never did it better than the Slick one. When it comes to Rick and his tales, 1988’s “Children’s Story” is perhaps his best, recited to this day by fans and MCs in training as a rite of passage.

      Just hearing the opening lines begins a sing-along that can quickly fill a room: “Once upon a time / Not long ago / When people wore pajamas / And lived life slow….” Get On Down, known for its unique approach to packaging hip-hop classics, has come up with another winner here, presenting the lyrics to this immortal rap tale in never-before-seen form. Rick’s lines from the song are re-created in visual form in a 16 page book with a puffy cover – presented like a legit children’s book, thick pages and all. From the little boy who was misled to the tense police chase, to the unsure children hearing the story from their “uncle Ricky,” this is the most unique way the story has ever been presented.

      Of course there is music to match – for this deluxe bundle comes packaged with an accompanying CD of The Great Adventures of Slick Rick, the 1988 Def Jam album that made Rick a worldwide star. Whether you pick this up for yourself or to give to the hip-hop fan on your shopping list who will stare wide-eyed at the unique package, no one will walk away from this one disappointed.

      FORMAT INFORMATION

      CD & Book Info: Deluxe Thick-Paged Children’s Book Based On The Titular Hip-Hop Track By Slick Rick! Comes Bundled With A Compact Disc Copy Of His Famed Album “The Great Adventures Of”

      Impossibles

      Hot Pepper

        The rise to fame of the talented Impossibles is one which will never be described as such. Historically regarded as a legendary and iconic 70s era string-pop band in their native land of Thailand, the Impossibles became well known internationally for their covers of Western rock songs. Having become nationally recognized in 1970 after winning the Thai Musicians Award for best professional band in the country (an award they would win the next two years), the Impossibles knew that they could ride their wave of success to international heights. In 1972 they left Thailand for an engagement in Honolulu, Hawaii – the one off gig turned into a year long string of performances, followed by a seventh month European tour - a move which raised the stature of the Impossibles to international fame. In 1975, the Impossibles became the first band in the history of Thailand to sign a recording contract with an international firm (Phonogram). “Hot Pepper” - an all English language recording, was also the first such album recorded overseas by a Thai pop group. In addition to rock and pop, the band's sound frequently crossed over into funk, R&B, country and folk. Two covers of Kool and the Gang tracks ("Give It Up" and Love The Life You Live") appear on their heralded 1975 album “Hot Pepper”. Get On Down is proud to present The Impossibles 1975 album “Hot Pepper” featuring audio completely remastered from the original audio tapes.

        Clipse

        Hell Hath No Fury - White Vinyl Edition

          In the 4 years after The Clipse dropped their sophomore classic Lord Willin' the duo was able to build a legacy that had fans hungry for new material. After the smoke cleared and they hit the studio the Virginia brothers recorded the confidently mature sophomore effort, Hell Hath No Fury. Best known for their unconventional radio smash "Grindin'," Clipse are no strangers to taking risks with the boundary-pushing Neptunes, who return as trusted co-pilots for Hell Hath No Fury. As always the duo is right at home over The Neptunes crafted beats which perfectly embrace Pusha's inventive drug-game metaphors and Malice's soul-baring confessionals.

          From the bouncy lead single "Mr. Me Too" and the Slim Thug assisted "Wamp Wamp" to the oddly haunting "Keys Open Doors" to "Momma I'm Sorry", Hell Hath No Fury represents some of the duo's best work. On the hypnotic "Keys Open Doors," over the eerie mix of screwed-up angelic voices, chimes and congas, the brothers run circles around the competition, while the spine-tingling boom-bap of "Ride Around Shining" sets the stage for Pusha's hilarious boasts. Whether rhyming over distorted, lo-fi guitar plucks ("Dirty Money") or overblown 808s ("Trill"), the brothers come with colorful references and inventive word play that easily places them in a lyrical class of their own. Get On Down now proudly issues this Neptunes produced favorite on LP for the first time ever with the first run on white vinyl.

          Special Ed

          I Got It Made

            Very limited single, we are getting very few copies of this. “I'm kinda young / But my tongue speaks maturity” Thus stated Special Ed, on his 1989 smash hit, “I Got It Made.” And he backed up that brag throughout his trademark anthem, which featured laid-back brags that MCs a half-decade his senior couldn’t mess with. The Brooklyn MC was only 16 when it was released, making him one of the youngest rappers – especially at the time, before the 90s brought us Kris Kross and Lil Bow Wow – to ever have a hip-hop hit. The song itself, which floated over a perfectly hooked up slice of Ripple’s “I Don’t Know What It Is, But It Sure Is Funky,” was produced by Hitman Howie Tee, who also made waves in the late ‘80s with his cousin, Chubb Rock.

            When Ed and Howie combined, it was a match made in heaven, and the song exploded in New York before taking over worldwide. Eventually becoming sample fodder on dozens of later songs – from Fat Joe to Kendrick Lamar – the track still invokes heavy head-nods today from crowds of all ages. Also included on this special 7-inch is the “Businesslike Version” of the song (also produced by Howie), which also appeared on the original 12-inch. Featuring a minimal, synth-driven backdrop and a quicker pace, it offers an excellent new way to experience Ed’s forward-thinking lyricism. This unique, deluxe “big hole” 7-inch comes housed in a custom Profile 45 jacket

            Wu-Tang Clan

            Method Man / Protect Ya Neck

            Wanna know why Wu-Tang are the baddest crew alive? It might be because they can put a record out which fuses references to Hall & Oats, Bootsy Collins, George McCrae, The Rolling Stones, Dr Seuss and Dick Van Fucking Dyke. As you'd guess from the name, "M.E.T.H.O.D. Man" finds Meth rocking the mic solo, with occasional adlibs from the rest of the clan - deranged as it gets really. It's all n together now on the flip, as RZA, GZA, Rebel INS, ODB, Meth, Rae, GFK and U-god go hard over a gloomy beat laced with piano and martial arts samples.

            Wu-Tang Clan

            Tearz / 7th Chamber-Part II (Conclusion)

            Another strong contender for "Enter The Wu-Tang"'s finest moment is the sublime ghetto storytelling of "Tearz", RZA and Ghost's powerful tale of dead homies and HIV set to a gritty flip of Wendy Rene's soul tearjerker "After Laugher". Flip it for the bass heavy reprise of "7th Chamber" which closed the finest rap album ever made. Over a rugged beat of JBs drums and nasty synth bass the Clan explode with RZA, GZA, Meth, GFK, INS, ODB and Rae all bringing maximum heat.

            Wu-Tang Clan

            Can It Be All So Simple / Da Mystery Of Chessboxin

            "Hey, you know, everybody's talking about the "good old days," right? Everybody! The good old days
            Well, let's talk about the good old days!"

            Just in case you were thinking the Wu could only do hardcore bangers, they go and break our hearts with this story of youthful capers and hard times. Over a perfect sample of Gladys Knight's "The Way We Were", Raekwon and Ghostface Killah go gloriously deep into their days on Staten Island. Flip it for the mighty "Da Mystery Of Chessboxin", a skeletal car banger featuring U-God, Rebel INS, Raekwon, Meth, ODB, Ghost and Masta Ace and a decidedly oriental beat. All together now... "Raw I'ma give it to ya, with no trivia, raw like cocaine straight from Bolivia..."

            Wu-Tang Clan

            Bring Da Ruckus / Shame On A Nigga

            "I rip it hardcore, like porno-flick bitches
            I roll with groups of ghetto bastards with biscuits"

            A strong contender for the hardest LP opener ever, "Bring Da Ruckus" introduced Shaolin's finest to the wider world. A perfect example of their unique style, the cut kills us with hard hitting drums, off key piano chords, kung fu flick samples and pure gangsta shit from GFK, Raekwon, Inspectah Deck and GZA. FYI, INS and GZA's verses are up their with the best in hip hop history. Flip the 7" and feel the force of "Shame On A Nigga", a sword swinging neck wringing bomb based on that super funk horn riff from the dying seconds of Syl Johnson's "Different Strokes" and those woozy, weirdo, descending jazz keys from Monk's "Black & Tan Fantasy". Obvs Meth and Rae bring it on their verses, but it's ODB's mad genius which has me setting the needle back time and again.

            Wu Tang Clan

            Clan In Da Front / Wu-Tang : 7th Chamber

            Here's a fat 7" slab of pure Shaolin fiyah, kicking off with the deranged and insane sound of 'Clan In Da Front'. RZA blows our heads with a madcapped intro, flips the buzz and bassline from The New Birth's 'Honeybee' then drops into one of his finest off-key jazz flips, slamming Monk's 'Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are' in the MPC and playing merry havoc. GZA then shows us why he's the Clan's finest lyricist, blasting through two minutes of inventive invective straight from the heart. Flip it for the heavyweight, rough and ready Shaolin funk of "7th Chamber", a classic Wu cut which sees Rae, Meth, Rebel INS, Ghost, RZA, ODB and GZA go buckwild over a gritty beat nabbed from The Charmel's 'As Long As I've Got You'.

            Wu-Tang Clan

            Wu Tang Clan Aint Nuthing To F' Wit / C.R.E.A.M.

            'Tiger Style...Tiger Style....' - Possibly my favourite RZA beat, "Ain't Nothing To Fuck With" sees RZA slicing and dicing a cartoon vocal, some killer finger pops and a whole load of funky drumming, lacing the track before he joins Inspectah Deck and Method Man at the cypher - all three members killing it on that cryptic street shit. Flip it, and we get MTV video classic, 'C.R.E.A.M', another flip on The Charmel's "As Long As I've Got You" (must have been big in the RZA household), giving us that classic ghetto story telling from INS, Rae and Meth. I could listen to RZA's beat for about 4 hours, but the on point lyrics and inventive flow take this to the next level. 

            Lee Perry & The Full Experience

            Disco Devil

              For Black Friday Record Store Day 2017, your friends at Get On Down bring you a beautiful package of roots reggae weirdness from the almighty Upsetter: Lee “Scratch” Perry. This red vinyl 12” with a stamped outer sleeve features the song “Disco Devil,” recorded by the legendary Jamaican mad genius with the group The Full Experience, as a version of Max Romeo’s “Chase the Devil.” But don’t jump to conclusions based on the song title – musically this is as far as you can get from Saturday Night Fever. Thick, reverb-drenched dub/roots reggae laced with Perry’s dusted vocals and brilliant work behind the boards are on the menu throughout. This cut is undeniably underrated in Perry’s catalog and fans will eat this up, since it has always been hard to find on 7” and 12” for many years now. 

              FORMAT INFORMATION

              Ltd 12" Info: 12” Red Vinyl With Stamped Outer Sleeve

              “All of a sudden, Jamaica awoke one morning and U-Roy was everywhere…” So read the original liner notes to this classic reggae LP, which originally hit in 1971 and washed over the island like a grooving tropical storm. U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the early 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called “toasting,” which in addition to bringing Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American vocal style also in its infancy: rapping.

              This full-length, his first after a string of singles (mostly on the Treasure Isle and other Duke Reid labels, run by the famed producer and studio owner), rolls like a crazy party where a wobbly, but talented, “master of ceremonies” grabs the mic and won’t let go. Speaking over and around songs that already have straight-ahead vocals on them, U-Roy shows the world why he is considered an iconoclast and trailblazer. In all honesty, there are few standouts on the album since they all run a similar course, and all are captivating in their own way. Modern listeners will especially note “Tide Is High,” originally by the Paragons (featuring dulcet-toned vocalist John Holt) and recorded later as a 1980 smash hit by Blondie.

              Each track here is a new adventure, and while U-Roy’s approach might take some getting used to, it will eventually capture your ears as it did the entire island of Jamaica in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Sit back, drop the needle, and enjoy. 

              When it comes to old-school roots reggae, few groups were as influential as The Maytals. Adding Frederick “Toots” Hibbert’s name to the front of their billing later in the 1970s, in the earliest days they were more egalitarian as they built their sound and legend. From The Roots, originally released on Trojan Records in 1970 (alongside another full-length that same year, Monkey Man), was a transitional record for the group. Leaving behind their early ska days – much like The Wailers and other peers – they had yet to settle into the slower tempos that blew in like ganja smoke by the mid-‘70s. As a result, music here generally gallops, and vocals fall in line. As heard on gems like “Koo Koo,” “Got To Feel,” and “Pee Pee Cluck Cluck,” the Maytals’ lyrics tend mostly towards love and the pursuit thereof. The group, throughout its career, was also deeply spiritual and much of this was expressed through song – a great case in point here is “Thy Kingdom Come,” essentially a church hymn set to reggae music. And the album concludes with an interesting cover of the Lennon/McCartney hippie chestnut, “Give Peace A Chance,” which is much faster than the original and quite groovy overall. The Maytals are generally overlooked in the pantheon of reggae giants, but this is unjust. Do your part in recognizing their legendary status by digging into this filling meal of classic Jamaican fare.

              U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the earliest 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called 'toasting', which in addition to branching out Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American genre in its infancy: rapping. On "Dread In A Babylon", his third full-length, he stretches out over traditional roots grooves provided by the Soul Syndicate and Skin, Flesh & Bones bands, riffing on topics including love (“Runaway Girl,” a 1975 single released in the UK on Virgin Records); the Bible (“The Great Psalms”); walking the straight and narrow (“Listen To The Teacher”); and even his take on governmental policy goals (“Chalice In The Palace”). The album finishes with an instrumental version of Bob Marley & The Wailers’ “Trench Town Rock,” for good measure.

              U-Roy’s style and charisma are always on display, and - as with all of his classic records - the groove rules all. Presented on black vinyl with a poster of the glorious, ganja-drenched cover art, it’s the perfect chance to revisit one of the more underrated voices in Jamaican musical history. 

              The contemporary realm of hip hop music can be seen as polarized between two sides; mainstream versus underground, industry versus independent, at a base level boiled down to catchy sounds & infective hooks over higher quality lyrical content. These elements don’t need to be mutually exclusive, but these days it’s rare to find an act that can please all sides of the discussion. Clipse are one of the few groups that successfully and consistently caters to both sides of rap’s splintered psyche, simultaneously serving the scene with upbeat bangers that get the club poppin’ & subwoofers rattlin’ while crafting clever quotable compositions deserving of repeated headphone submersions. Though their preceding official albums "Lord Willin’" & "Hell Hath No Fury" made bigger splashes commercially, 2009’s "Til The Casket Drops" is surely no slouch, a gem which deserves to be revisited with fresh ears – good thing Get On Down has given it the proper treatment it deserves with its first-ever vinyl pressing!
              Clipse have always delighted in dualities, juxtapositions and contradictions, unabashedly celebrating the capitalistic lifestyle and the grind as the kings of ‘coke-rap’, while taking hard looks at society’s mores and those of their own individual journeys. We hear Malice’s eventual transition to No Malice taking form on this album as he found religion, warning others who might follow in his path on ‘Footsteps’: “don’t let my wrongs give you the right of way/ to emulate my past escaping the law’s grasp” while refusing to be pinned down in one lane: “it weights on my conscience and I hate conscious rap”. Meanwhile Pusha T continues his lyrical ascent into the King Push persona with bars like “pompous motherfucker, look what them jewels made me/ I’m only finding comfort in knowing you can’t replace me/ What a thing to say, but what am I to do/ I’m role-playing a conscious nigga and true is true/ Cocaine aside, all of the bloggers behooved/ My critics finally have a verse of mine to jerk off to” decisively on album opener “Freedom”.
              Since it dropped, the Clipse have stated that Casket… is their final album together while subsequently alluding to the possibility of an eventual reunion. Only time will tell, but until then it’s time to re-celebrate one of hip hop’s most dynamic duos by hearing "Til The Casket Drops" in a whole new light with its long-overdue, first time on vinyl pressing via Get On Down featuring all 13 original tracks on wax and cover art by the legendary KAWS! It’s kinda like a big deal…

              By the time Mobb Deep hit with their third album – "Hell On Earth" – they were solidified street legends. Coming off the critically acclaimed "The Infamous", Havoc and Prodigy hit the lab and came back with a soundtrack that is fitting to its title. Havoc’s production is atmospheric; laced with his trademark drums loops and sharp pianos stabs. Add Prodigy’s unique flow and it’s evident that the pairing is a match made in heaven (or in this case hell!). While "Hell On Earth" is essentially a continuation of "The Infamous" you can still hear the growth in both performers and this double pack stands as some of their best work. The album features guest appearances by Nas, Raekwon, Method Man, and frequent collaborator Big Noyd. Not only did "Hell On Earth" boast acclaimed singles "G.O.D. Pt. III", "Hell on Earth (Front Lines)," and “Drop a Gem on 'Em", but it also featured killer album cuts “Animal Instinct”, “Bloodsport”, “More Trife Life” and “Can't Get Enough”. Essential listening for any rap fans out there, it's good to see this one back in the racks.

              Although they have been tragically defunct for almost two decades, the influence of Gang Starr is still felt today, almost as heavily as it was back in the 1990s, when DJ Premier and Guru ruled atop boom-bap mountain. As fans know, beyond the duo’s direct output, one of their lasting legacies was bringing younger talent to the rap world at large – including Jeru The Damaja, M.O.P., Afu-Ra and Big Shug. One of the more unsung talents that came out of the Gang Starr Foundation was the Brooklyn-based duo Group Home, consisting of MCs Lil Dap and Melachi The Nutcracker. Dap was first showcased on the Gang Starr posse cut “I’m The Man,” on 1992’s Daily Operation; Melachi appeared on “Words From The Nutcracker” from 1993’s Hard To Earn.

              The early Group Home song “So Called Friends” was also featured on 1993’s now-legendary Gangstarr Foundation Sampler, which also gave the world Jeru’s “Come Clean.” By 1995, Dap and Melachi had paid their dues and finally got their own full-length: Livin’ Proof. And it was everything that Gang Starr and any true school hip-hop fans could have wanted, produced almost entirely by DJ Premier (with two exceptions: “Serious Rap Shit” helmed by Guru himself; and “4 Give My Sins,” produced by Jay-Z mentor Jaz-O (aka Big Jazz).

              Beyond the album’s still-jocked commercial singles – “Supa Star,” “Livin’ Proof” and “Suspended In Time” – there are Premier-overseen classics all over, including “The Realness,” “Inna Citi Life,” and “Sacrifice.” In fact, many Gang Starr scholars agree that the beats on Living Proof are in the Top 5 of all Premier-produced albums – no small boast, but certainly hard to disprove. More than two decades later, the album still sounds as strong as it did upon its release. So dust off your turntable and give it another ride, back to the days when boom-bap was real, and ruling.

              Boogie Down Productions

              Ghetto Music: The Blueprint Of Hip Hop

              Amongst hip-hop fans, Boogie Down Productions’ first two albums – "Criminal Minded" (1987) and "By All Means Necessary" (1988) – loom very large. And for good reason: they both captured one of the late 1980s’ most important and influential crews at their highest powers of lyricism and musical invention. That being said, too many people sleep on BDP’s third LP, Ghetto Music. Released in 1989, when the hip-hop world was truly beginning to explode and reach new heights of sales and exposure around the world, the album is arguably as powerful as the group’s first two.
              As on "By All Means Necessary", in the wake of the tragic death of original founder, producer and DJ Scott LaRock, KRS-One pushed along mightily on the production side, with help from his extended crew. Musically the sound created on albums 2 & 3 was funky, catchy, and continually innovative, giving him the perfect backdrop to build his “Edutainment” syllabus. Lyrically there was never a question about KRS’ power, and on "Ghetto Music" he continues to impress, teach and ask important questions. Clear cases in point are two of the album’s singles, “You Must Learn” and “Why Is That?” but he gets even deeper on lesser-jocked tracks like the anti-police thought-piece “Who Protects Us From You” (still sadly relevant in 2017), “Ghetto Music” and “World Peace.” Still as strong and entertaining today as it was almost three decades ago, this new reissue is a perfect way for younger fans to embrace one of the most underrated hip-hop platters of the era.

              According to legend, when the Wu-Tang Clan formed like Voltron on their debut album in 1993, GZA happened to be the head - an appropriate place for a man also called “The Genius”. Yet at the time few could have predicted that his 1995 masterpiece Liquid Swords would be considered “one of the most substantial lyrical journeys in hip-hop history” (Chicago Tribune). At the peak of his powers as a producer, Wu-Tang mastermind RZA crafted the album's distinctive soundtrack at his basement studio in Staten Island; a haunting landscape of dusty samples, sharp snares and menacing urban gloom, with frequent interludes of dialogue from the classic Samurai flick Shogun Assassin. Cerebral, strategic and precise with his words, GZA crystallizes a range of influences - from chess to kung-fu films to mob flicks and Eastern philosophy - into sharply delivered rhymes. The album features appearances by the entire Wu-Tang Clan, and includes the auspicious debut of Killah Priest on “B.I.B.L.E.”. Endlessly quotable, unfeasibly flowable and sharp as a Hattori Hanzō blade, "Liquid Swords" is arguably the finest rap album ever made.

              U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the early 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called “toasting,” which in addition to bringing Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American vocal style also in its infancy: rapping. Following up the RSD17 release of U-Roy’s classic "Dread In A Babylon", Trafficnow brings us a very welcome reissue of the vocalist’s 1976 full-length (and fourth) album, "Natty Rebel", which has been out of print for more than 30 years. Produced by Tony Robinson (known for his work with Big Youth, Lloyd Parks, the Gladiators and many more), the album’s 11 cuts range from bouncier and sometimes even disco-tinged grooves – “Have Mercy,” “Go There Natty” and the album lead-off, “Babylon Burning” – to the classic roots stepping that drew fans to the legendary Jamaican vocalist over his long career – including “So Jay Jah Say” and “Natty Kung Fu.” At its core, this is a deep journey into the heart of rasta living, spoken by one of Jamaica’s most underrated dub and roots legends, and it’s one of the strongest full-lengths in his expansive catalog. Whether you are experiencing U-Roy for the first time, or replacing your decades-old original LP, diving into this reissue of "Natty Rebel" is one hell of a way to spend an afternoon. Or, if you’re not careful, a week or two. 

              STAFF COMMENTS

              Patrick says: As you read this, there's every chance I'm tucking into breadfruit stew, rice an' pea and a side of fried plantain, my culinary experience enhanced no end by this U-Roy classic.

              Wu-Tang Clan

              Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) 7" Box Set

                Get On Down Presents : "Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)" complete album on 7” for the first time ever housed in a deluxe casebook created in full collaboration with The RZA. This absolutely unique, deluxe edition of this classic album – which has been created in full collaboration with The RZA – is presented as a “Casebook” hardcover book, which houses the album’s 12 full songs that are divided into six 7”s. And beyond the 56-page liner notes, six additional pages have a Wu-Tang logo picture sleeve in which to put the vinyl.

                Besides the vinyl, the centerpiece of the Casebook is a 56-page Shaolinology book, featuring input by RZA, written by journalist Chris Faraone. Beyond many never-before-discussed Wu-Tang nuggets, the book also includes rare photos of the group, lyrics for all album songs, as well as other images and advertisements from the Enter The Wu-Tang era. For the Wu-Tang Clan fan – this is a trophy to be proudly displayed to celebrate the influence of one of music’s most influential groups. The group’s classic (November) 1993 debut album is presented as a set of six 7” vinyl records. The unique hardcover “Casebook,” holds six 7”s as book pages, along with an in-depth liner notes book. Casebook features a 56-page book (aka The Shaolinthology), with new RZA input / interviews, extensive research by journalist Chris Faraone, album lyrics, rarely-seen photos and other rare images from the Enter The Wu-Tang era. 

                FORMAT INFORMATION

                7" Box Set Info: Deluxe 7” Casebook

                Dr. Octagon

                Dr. Octagonecologyst

                  Dan The Automator’s and Kool Keith’s famed collaboration from the mid-‘90s is celebrated with a 28-track set housed in a custom, octagonal box, with 5 unreleased songs (originals + remixes); original Pushead cover artwork; and 40 page liner notes booklet. By the mid-1990s, the rap game had been through a lot in its two decades of existence: Early-days scraping to get by and be heard; The advent of sampling; The rise of groups ranging from Run-DMC to the Wu-Tang Clan and the sprawl of Dr. Dre’s shadow from the West across the globe; and solo juggernauts ranging from MC Hammer to the Notorious B.I.G. Thankfully, though, with everything that the genre had been through, there was still a lot of room to grow. And in early 1996, a new indie duo appeared that won over a whole new international audience, from hard rocks to skate punks. That pair was Dr. Octagon: Dan “The Automator” Nakamura and Kool Keith [Thornton]. In some ways, the Dr. Octagon album is a solo release.

                  But Keith wasn’t the only hand on deck. He brought along a young, New York-based MC with him: Sir Menelik. Menelik was featured on four album tracks, starting with “Dr. Octagon,” and proved to be an excellent super-scientifical, fast-rhyming foil to Keith. And there was one final featured contributor who helped add to the album’s next-level sound: San Francisco’s DJ Q*Bert, who cuts on half of the album’s songs. The album originally came out on The Automator’s Bulk Recordings label in early 1996, with cover art by metal and punk cult hero visual artist Pushead. Pressing numbers weren’t huge, but as the year went on, the buzz grew, and a slightly expanded version of the album was released on James Lavelle’s London-based Mo Wax label.

                  Then Dan took an offer from newly-formed major label DreamWorks, to re-release the album with extra tracks in mid-1997. The new domestic pressing allowed for a bigger press push, as well as the group’s first and only video, for “Blue Flowers.” Beyond “Blue Flowers,” the album is chock-full of mind-bending tracks, like “Earth People”; the wacked-out but sincere love ballad “Girl Let Me Touch You”; the metal-tinged “I’m Destructive”; Q-Bert’s turntable workout “Bear Witness”; and, of course, freaky Keith skits like “Elective Surgery” and “General Hospital”. Dr. Octagonecologyst is one of the most unique rap records the genre has ever seen, and this is the perfect way to celebrate it – whether it’s the first time you have heard this mind-expanding record, or the three thousandth. 

                  FORMAT INFORMATION

                  3xLtd LP Info: 28-track set housed in a custom, octagonal box, with 5 unreleased songs (originals + remixes); original Pushead cover artwork; and 40 page liner notes booklet.

                  FREE SHIPPING This item has FREE UK shipping!

                  Too many people sleep on "Tougher Than Leather", Run-DMC’s fourth album. But hear us out as we plead the case for this amazing LP. By 1988 there was a lot more competition in the rap game – Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, Eric B. & Rakim, Ice-T and many more had given Hollis, Queens’ prodigal sons lots of competition. But Joe, Darryl and Jay were still at the top of their game, and hip-hop fans should never let this classic – chiefly produced by their Queens neighbor, DJ and multi-instrumentalist Davy D[MX] – get lost in their crates. For starters, the album’s first single, “Run’s House” b/w “Beats To The Rhyme” is arguably the most powerful one-two punch of the trio’s career, showing contenders to the rap throne that they could still destroy a beat, tag-teaming with power at any speed. Not to be lost in the shuffle, fans were also reminded on both sides that Jam-Master Jay remained one of the world’s best DJs, flexing the pinnacle of what would be called “turntablism” a decade later. Both songs show a musical telepathy between all three that has rarely been equalled. The second single, “Mary, Mary,” driven by an infectious Monkees sample, took a different approach, shrewdly ensuring that pop fans who jumped on the Raising Hell bandwagon had something to chew on. But, like “Walk This Way,” the song wasn’t just bubblegum – there was an edge to it, and the lyrical gymnastics were very real. It wasn’t selling out, it was allowing fans to buy in. “Papa Crazy,” driven in concept and by a sample from the Temptations’ “Papa Was A Rolling Stone,” followed a similar pop-leaning path. Overall, the lyrical content on the album was a step up from the group’s first three LPs. It’s easy to infer, looking back, that they were feeling the heat from their younger competitors in the rap game.

                  Run-DMC’s self-titled 1984 debut pushed the doors of pop music open, showing that hip-hop was not the fad that haters had prophesized. As they proved decisively on Run-DMC, rap was a legit art form, fully capable of producing long-players full of no-fast-forward cuts. By 1985, any doubters were running on fumes, as the group’s King Of Rock blew the aforementioned pop doors off their hinges.

                  Emboldened by their success (including the first rap album to ever go Gold); energized by worldwide touring and accolades; and given all the support they could want by a genius producer (Larry Smith), an open-minded label (Profile) and a charismatic manager (Russell Simmons, who also lent a hand on production), they ruled the charts and hinted at even greater things to come. The album’s most fondly-remembered single set the album’s tone perfectly: “King Of Rock” was hard, full of charisma and tag-team vocal finesse, and had enough guitars to bring the suburbs into the rap fold. The song’s video was equally popular and powerful, and the pioneering MTV exposure drove the group into a new stratosphere. But there was much more to King Of Rock than the title track, including more rock / rap hybrids.

                  Not a lot of people know this, but Toots & The Maytal's were amongst the first group to coin the term 'reggae'. Pivotel in the ska movement of the late 50s / early 60s, they used the word in a song title which lead to popularization of the term 'reggae. "In The Dark" was the group's second long player and contains the synonymous, feel good sound of JA which would make cement the release into the pantheon of the great reggae albums. Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios in Kingston the album is polished, clean cut and radio friendly, elevating its status as this is was took the local music to Europe and beyond. Laying the foundations for Bob Marley and others to follow. There's even a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” If you’re only familiar with the original, well let’s just say Toots Hibbert’s beyond soulful vocals may make you forget you ever heard that other version of the song. Reissued in a lovingly re-printed version of the original LP sleeve, Get On Down now presents a superb reissue of a legendary piece of music history. Get on board!

                  Lyn Collins

                  We Want To Parrty, Parrty, Parrty / You Can’t Beat Two People In Love

                  People Records was the revered funk/soul imprint of the legendary James Brown, who throughout the 1970s curated and made it home to an array of top-tier deep funk artists, singers, and songwriters. It was during this time that the label hosted a variety of "funky divas" like Marva Whitney, Vicki Anderson, and Myra Barnes. Unquestionably the greatest of them all was Lyn Collins, whose R&B hit, the frequently-sampled "Think (About It)" is one of the most enduring singles to emerge from Brown's People label. Get On Down now presents here, an unearthed gem from the famed "Female Preacher." "We Want To Parrty, Parrty, Parrty" was previously unavailable on any Lyn Collins full-length release, and has never been reissued as a standalone 7" single until now. The track is a rollicking funk burner, produced by James Brown himself, and has sampled its way into tracks by Eric B. & Rakim, The Prodigy, De La Soul, and Big Daddy Kane among others, and comes on a large hole 45 with freshly re-mastered audio. "You Can't Beat Two People In Love", the funky soul-ballad B-side, is not to be missed either, featuring additional backing vocals by Brown.

                  Cypress Hill

                  Cypress Hill - Clear Vinyl Edition

                  Clear vinyl pressing limited to 700 copies. Somewhere in between the rock-star mischief of the Beastie Boys and the slow-creeping funk of Dr. Dre, Cypress Hill introduced their hazy-eyed sound to the world on their self-titled 1991 debut and things have never quite been the same since. The original Cypress Hill album captures the group at their risk-taking best, mixing gangster posturing, LA street politics, Latin flavor and warped humor together under a thick cloud of weed smoke and innovative beats. Nasal-voiced rapper B-Real and his partner Sen Dog, backed by the adventurous production styles of DJ Muggs, produce classics records like “How I Could Just Kill a Man,” “Pigs,” “Stoned is the Way of the Walk” and “Hand on the Pump.” Since its release, the album has won acclaim as one of Rolling Stone's “Essential Recordings of the 90s” and “Top 100 Best Rap Albums” by The Source magazine. Get On Down is proud to present one of the most influential and important hip-hop albums ever, Cypress Hil clear vinyl release, featuring audio remastered from the original source tapes.

                  Augustus Pablo

                  This Is Augustus Pablo - Get On Down Edition

                  Augustus Pablo (Horace Swaby) was born just outside of Kingston. “I am a Kingstonian,” he told the NME in 1986, “but my heart is for the hills.” This mystical connection to “the hills” is at the heart of Pablo's unique and immediately identifiable sound. By the late '60s, Swaby and his brother Dougie had founded a small sound system they called Rockers. The brothers spent a lot of time in record shops, including Aquarius, where owner Herman Chin-Loy heard Swaby experimenting on his melodica and was struck by the inspiration to record. The resulting tune was credited to Augustus Pablo, a name that Chin-Loy invented, as the story goes, to give an air of mystery to the release. Pablo recorded two more singles soon after with “Java” becoming a major hit and being voted Instrumental Song Of The Year by Jamaica's Swing Magazine. This success led to the Randy's label moving to create a full-length album from Pablo. Recording in the Randy's studio upstairs from the record shop “we weren't watching the clock...we had the studio,” Clive Chin recalled. The band included a cast of the greatest reggae musicians of all time: future Wailer Tyrone Downie on keyboards, Aston “Family Man” Barrett, “Fully” Fullwood and Lloyd Parks on the bass, Carlton Barrett, “Santa” Davis and Lloyd “Tin Leg” Adams were on drums and Earl “Chinna” Smith played guitar. In addition to these future Hall of Famers, the mixing board was helmed by Errol Thompson. Thompson and Chin would together pioneer a tough, new reggae sound that, Chin referred to as “Rockers” after the Swaby brothers' Rockers Hi-Fi sound system. 'This Is Augustus Pablo' is considered among the greatest collections of Jamaican instrumental music and is an essential part of reggae history. 

                  Ol' Dirty Bastard

                  Return To The 36 Chambers - The Dirty Version

                  It's safe to say that hip-hop has never seen an album like Ol’ Dirty Bastard's 1995 solo debut 'Return to the 36 Chambers'. The brief glimpses of ODB's unhinged genius provided by Wu-Tang Clan's landmark Enter the Wu-Tang album two years earlier were begging to be expanded on to a larger canvas, and, with RZA guiding production, the album promised to give Dirty the creative license to make one of the most bizarre, entertaining and original LPs in hip-hop history. With his raspy, drunken flow and dark sense of humor, Dirty fearlessly attacks from all angles, throwing himself fearlessly into punchy rhyme attacks (“Damage,” with GZA), drugged-out party jams (the monster singles “Brooklyn Zoo” and “Shimmy Shimmy Ya”) and bizarre, grimly hilarious fantasies of sex and violence (“Don't U Know” and the R&B-tinged “Sweet Sugar Pie”). Backed by RZA's appropriately gritty, dissonant beats and appearances from the Clan, Return became an instant hit, selling over 1 million copies and earning a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rap Album in 1996. The album stands as a high water mark in the Wu-Tang Clan's collective creative output and was selected as one of the Best 100 Rap Albums by The Source magazine in 1998.


                  Jurassic 5 flexed serious old-to-the-new muscles in the ‘90s, beginning with their independently released single “Unified Rebelution” in 1994, and book-ending with their stellar debut full-length: 2000’s Quality Control. They walked a tightrope between underground and mainstream hip-hop, and toured alongside rap peers as well as punk rockers on the Vans Warped Tour. With double the pleasure of your average hip-hop group – two DJs and producers (Cut Chemist and DJ Nu-Mark); and four MCs (Chali 2na, Akil, Marc 7 and Zaakir aka Soup) – they brought the late 1970s “unison MC” style of pioneering groups like the Fantastic 5 and the Force MCs to a new generation. Even more surprisingly, they did so out of Los Angeles, whose hip-hop flavors generally leaned towards Gangsta, G-Funk or Electro lines. Musically inventive and lyrically forward-thinking, each song on Quality Control is a new adventure, exploring engaging territory, delivered via one of the best live hip-hop shows fans had seen in years. From singles like the strutting groove of the title track to the throwback doo-wop samples on “The Influence” and the catchy, keyboard groove-driven “World of Entertainment (WOE Is Me),” to deeper album tracks like the lyrical gymnastics of “Jurass Finish First” and the thought-provoking “Lausd,” Jurassic 5 consistently stepped to the plate and their fans responded in kind, nearly pushing the album to Gold status. Add the innovative DJ-and-sample workout which closes out the album, “Swing Set,” and you have one of the 2000s’ most unique and solid full-length platters.

                  By 1976, Lee "Scratch" Perry was well established at his Black Ark studio, a fact proven by the quality of the creations emerging from its walls. The success of Max Romeo's "War in a Babylon" brought a deal with Island Records and the possibility of greater financial rewards. The single was followed by a full-length album of the same name as well as deejay Jah Lion's Columbia Colly LP. Riding this crest of productivity, Scratch then turned to a creation of his own. Super Ape offered a series of the producer's finest 1976 rhythms, from Devon Irons' "When Jah Come" and the Blue Bells' "Come Along" to Romeo's "War in a Babylon" and "Chase the Devil." All are bathed in the distinct, murky atmosphere that was becoming a Black Ark trademark, then served up in the form of dub-like de-constructions. Island's UK / US sequencing of Super Ape places "Dread Lion" at the album's heart. If any track fulfills the cover's promise to "Dub it up, blacker than dread", this is it. Vocals from numerous cuts seem to compete for their spot on the rhythm, while a dizzying mix of horns, flute and melodica swirl around them. Punctuating the song's rock-solid underbelly, Perry conjures startling thunderclaps from his mixing board. Other Super Ape heavyweights include "Croaking Lizard" and "Zion's Blood": thick muscular constructs from the Upsetter session team. The former features an excellent Prince Jazzbo toast over the "Chase the Devil" rhythm, while the latter, a cut of "When Jah Come," draws its elusive meaning from vocal phrases courtesy of Heptones Earl Morgan and Barry Llewellyn. Super Ape is a dubwise, alternate universe to Perry's Black Ark vocal hits. It awaits anyone willing to heed its closing call: "This is the ape-man, trodding through creation, are you ready to step with I man?".

                  Afrika Bambaataa & The Soul Sonic Force

                  Planet Rock - Glow In The Dark Vinyl Edition

                    Afrika Bambaataa & Soul Sonic Force “Planet Rock” 12-inch re-issue on glow-in-the-dark vinyl (Limited edition of 1982 copies) B-Boy anthem from 1982 lights up any dancefloor…literally! First time ever on glow-in-the-dark vinyl! Fresh off Bambaataa’s historic donation of his vinyl collection to the Cornell University Hip-Hop Collection and the Fall 2014 “Renegades of Rhythm” tour by DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist celebrating his unparalleled contribution to hip-hop, Get On Down celebrates the song for which the Godfather of Hip-Hop is best known: 1982’s “Planet Rock,” a Kraftwerk-meets-Bronx-B-Boy anthem. Renowned the world over as a never-fail floor-filler, this new 12-inch pressing of the single is pressed on glow-in-the-dark vinyl for the first time ever. Although Bambaataa may have gotten top-billing on the release, it was a team effort, with crucial contributions by a team including DJ Jazzy Jay, Afrika Islam, Arthur Baker, John Robie, a Roland TR-808 drum machine (aka Planet Patrol) and of course MCs Mr. Biggs, G.L.O.B.E. and Pow Wow. This edition is housed in a clear, custom-embossed Get On Down poly-bag to let the glow show through.

                    Eric B. & Rakim

                    Paid In Full (Mini Madness: Coldcut Remix)

                      THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2014 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

                      Available from Get on Down, we are proud to bring back this rare 7”, the UK Picture sleeve release of Eric B & Rakim’s Paid in Full (Mini Madness – The Coldcut Remix). When Eric B & Rakim debuted with Paid in Full in the summer of ‘87 the album was an immediate classic. By the time the cut "Paid in Full" was released as the album's fifth and final single, it became a hit in clubs, radio and MTV largely due to the songs remix. Enter Coldcut, a new DJ/Remix team from the U.K who at the time just made a big splash with a record of their own, the cut & paste classic “Say Kids What Time Is It”. It made such a huge buzz that Julian Palmer from Island Records urged them to do a remix of “Paid in Full”. The result was the “Mini Madness” mix which turned Rakim's one verse song into a magnum opus that that crossed cultures and influences into one seamless remix. Today it still holds as one of the most groundbreaking remixes ever, Rakim himself is even quoted as saying it was the “best remix” he has ever heard. What made this remix so special was how Coldcut incorporated several new elements in producing their remix, mainly the use of vocal samples. The most prominent in these samples was the addition of Israeli singer Ofra Haza, whose voice when lowered in pitch, synced perfectly with the Paid in Full breakbeat. Another notable element of the Coldcut remix is its opening vocal sample, "This is a journey into sound” which even today it is recognizable as the start of this Remix. "Now wait a minute, you better talk to my mother" comes from Humphrey Bogart and lines like "Pump up the volume" and "Dance to the record" are sampled from Eric B. & Rakim's own song "I Know You Got Soul". While there are many more vocal bits and breaks that go into what makes this remix so special, it’s better to let the music speak for itself.

                      Sly & The Family Stone

                      There's A Riot Goin' On - Gold Edition

                        This 24k audiophile gold disc reissue of Sly & The Family Stone’s classic There’s A Riot Goin' On is packaged in a deluxe box emblazoned with a unique embroidered flag cover and includes a 48 page hard cover book filled with photos and liner notes.

                        After 2 years in production the follow-up to Sly & The Family Stone’s 1969 smash Stand! was unveiled. Containing radio hits like “Family Affair,” “Runnin’ Away,” and “(You Caught Me) Smilin’,” it also (in true Sly fashion) dove deeper into a trippy sonic and lyrical universe exploring societal tensions (“Brave & Strong”) the motherland (“Thank You For Talkin’ To Me Africa”), personal relationships (“Just Like A Baby”) and artistic expression itself (“Poet”). The album reached #1 on both Pop and R&B charts and years later, was certified platinum, gaining tens of thousands of new fans with each passing year.

                        Sly definitively explained his concept for the cover art ‘I wanted the flag to truly represent people of all colors. I wanted suns instead of stars because stars to me imply searching, like you search for your star. And there are already too many stars in this world. But the sun, that’s something that is always there, looking right at you. Betsy Ross did the best she could with what she had. I thought I could do better.’”

                        That flag has been lovingly recreated by Get On Down, presented on the CD box cover as an actual embroidered fabric square to bring textureto an album which is already full to the brim with feeling. It’s a perfect way to pay tribute to one of the 20th century's musical geniuses a man who brought fans together during one of America's most turbulent eras.


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