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Field Music

Making A New World - Outstore Wristband Edition

    PRE-ORDER ANY FORMAT FOR 1 FREE WRISTBAND FOR AN INTIMATE EVENING (ONSTAGE AT 7PM) OUTSTORE GIG AT THE SOUP KITCHEN IN MANCHESTER ON ALBUM RELEASE DATE OF FRIDAY JANUARY 10th.

    WE ALSO HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF WRISTBAND ONLY PURCHASES AVAILABLE.

    IT'S ADVISED THAT YOU USE THE PICK-UP INSTORE OPTION AT THE CHECKOUT, THAT WAY YOU'LL BE ABLE TO COLLECT YOUR ALBUM AND THE WRISTBAND PRIOR TO THE GIG ON THE RELEASE DAY FRIDAY.


    NB: SOUP KITCHEN IS AN 18's ONLY VENUE. ID WILL BE REQUIRED.

    Field Music’s new release is “Making A New World”, a 19 track song cycle about the after-effects of the First World War. But this is not an album about war and it is not, in any traditional sense, an album about remembrance. There are songs here about air traffic control and gender reassignment surgery. There are songs about Tiananmen Square and about ultrasound. There are even songs about Becontree Housing Estate and about sanitary towels.

    The songs grew from a project for the Imperial War Museum and were first performed at their sites in Salford and London in January 2019. The starting point was an image from a 1919 publication on munitions by the US War Department, made using “sound ranging”, a technique that utilised an array of transducers to capture the vibrations of gunfire at the front. These vibrations were displayed on a graph, similar to a seismograph, where the distances between peaks on different lines could be used to pinpoint the location of enemy armaments. This particular image showed the minute leading up to 11am on 11th November 1918, and the minute immediately after. One minute of oppressive, juddering noise and one minute of near-silence. “We imagined the lines from that image continuing across the next hundred years,” says the band’s David Brewis, “and we looked for stories which tied back to specific events from the war or the immediate aftermath.” If the original intention might have been to create a mostly instrumental piece, this research forced and inspired a different approach. These were stories itching to be told.

    The songs are in a kind of chronological order, starting with the end of the war itself; the uncertainty of heading home in a profoundly altered world (“Coffee or Wine”). Later we hear a song about the work of Dr Harold Gillies (the shimmering ballad, “A Change of Heir”), whose pioneering work on skin grafts for injured servicemen led him, in the 1940s, to perform some of the very first gender reassignment surgeries. We see how the horrors of the war led to the Dada movement and how that artistic reaction was echoed in the extreme performance art of the 60s and 70s (the mathematical head-spin of “A Shot To The Arm”). And then in the funk stomp of Money Is A Memory, we picture an office worker in the German Treasury preparing documents for the final instalment on reparation debts - a payment made in 2010, 91 years after the Treaty of Versailles was signed. A defining, blood-spattered element of 20th century history becomes a humdrum administrative task in a 21st century bureaucracy.

    FORMAT INFORMATION

    Coloured LP Info: + 1 WRISTBAND.
    Limited transparent red 180 gram vinyl housed in a gatefold sleeve.

    CD Info: + 1 WRISTBAND.

    Wristband Only Info: IMPORTANT - this gives you access to the outstore gig on Friday January 10th ONLY.
    It does not entitle you to a copy of the album.
    Max 2 per person.

    Cassette Info: + 1 WRISTBAND.

    Field Music

    Making A New World

      Field Music’s new release is “Making A New World”, a 19 track song cycle about the after-effects of the First World War. But this is not an album about war and it is not, in any traditional sense, an album about remembrance. There are songs here about air traffic control and gender reassignment surgery. There are songs about Tiananmen Square and about ultrasound. There are even songs about Becontree Housing Estate and about sanitary towels. 

      The songs grew from a project for the Imperial War Museum and were first performed at their sites in Salford and London in January 2019. The starting point was an image from a 1919 publication on munitions by the US War Department, made using “sound ranging”, a technique that utilised an array of transducers to capture the vibrations of gunfire at the front. These vibrations were displayed on a graph, similar to a seismograph, where the distances between peaks on different lines could be used to pinpoint the location of enemy armaments. This particular image showed the minute leading up to 11am on 11th November 1918, and the minute immediately after. One minute of oppressive, juddering noise and one minute of near-silence. “We imagined the lines from that image continuing across the next hundred years,” says the band’s David Brewis, “and we looked for stories which tied back to specific events from the war or the immediate aftermath.” If the original intention might have been to create a mostly instrumental piece, this research forced and inspired a different approach. These were stories itching to be told.

      The songs are in a kind of chronological order, starting with the end of the war itself; the uncertainty of heading home in a profoundly altered world (“Coffee or Wine”). Later we hear a song about the work of Dr Harold Gillies (the shimmering ballad, “A Change of Heir”), whose pioneering work on skin grafts for injured servicemen led him, in the 1940s, to perform some of the very first gender reassignment surgeries. We see how the horrors of the war led to the Dada movement and how that artistic reaction was echoed in the extreme performance art of the 60s and 70s (the mathematical head-spin of “A Shot To The Arm”). And then in the funk stomp of Money Is A Memory, we picture an office worker in the German Treasury preparing documents for the final instalment on reparation debts - a payment made in 2010, 91 years after the Treaty of Versailles was signed. A defining, blood-spattered element of 20th century history becomes a humdrum administrative task in a 21st century bureaucracy.

      FORMAT INFORMATION

      Coloured LP Info: Limited transparent red 180 gram vinyl housed in a gatefold sleeve.

      The two years since Commontime have been strange and turbulent. If you thought the world made some kind of sense, you may have questioned yourself a few times in the past two years. And that questioning, that erosion of faith - in people, in institutions, in shared experience - runs through every song on the new Field Music album.

      But there's no gloom here. For Peter and David Brewis, playing together in their small riverside studio has been a joyful exorcism. Open Here is the last in a run of five albums made at the studio, an unprepossessing unit on a light industrial estate in Sunderland. Whilst the brothers weren't quite tracking while the wrecking balls came, the eviction notice received in early 2017 gave them a sense of urgency in the recording of Open Here.

      There probably won't be many other rock records this year, or any year, which feature quite so much flute and flugelhorn (alongside the saxophones, string quartet and junk box percussion). But somehow or other, it comes together. Over thirteen years and six albums, Field Music have managed to carve a niche where all of these sounds can find a place; a place where pop music can be as voracious as it wants to be.

      STAFF COMMENTS

      Barry says: Oh Field music, will your jagged chords and thumping, percussive oddness never grow weary? Apparently not, because here we have another outing that hasn't been off the shop stereo since we got the promo a few weeks back. We're all still enamoured here, and you will be too.

      Various Artists

      Drop On Down In Florida: Field Recordings Of African American Traditional Music 1977–1980

        An expanded reissue of a double LP from 1981. The book contains original liner notes with new essays, annotations and 60 images (most of which are published for the first time). The CDs feature all of the recordings from the original double-LP, plus 80 minutes of audio available for the first time.

        Based on four years of fieldwork throughout the state, the Florida Folklife Program released the two-album, 27-track LP Drop on Down in Florida: Recent Field Recordings of Afro-American Traditional Music in 1981. The album was intended to highlight African American music traditions for a statewide public audience, blues and sacred traditions in particular. In recent years, the Folklife Program sought the opportunity to produce an expanded reissue of the album that would include previously unissued fieldwork recordings and photos. Dust-to-Digital, an award-winning record label known for specially packaged rereleases of American vernacular music, agreed to release the expanded reissue. Drawing upon extensive fieldwork materials now housed in the State Archives of Florida, the expanded reissue includes nearly 80 new minutes of music on 28 new tracks, plus numerous photos documenting the musicians and communities that perpetuated these traditions.

        Notable among the previously unreleased tracks are additional musical selections and personal narratives from one-string musician Moses Williams, four-shape-note Sacred Harp singing from an African American community in the Florida Panhandle, and recordings from the Richard Williams family in the blues and gospel-blues traditions. The reissue also includes new track notes from respected music scholars David Evans and Doris J. Dyen; reflective essays from past and present folklorists with the Florida Folklife Program, including Peggy A. Bulger, Dwight DeVane, Doris J. Dyen, and Blaine Waide; and an extensive essay on African American one-string instrument traditions by David Evans. The 2012 edition, Drop on Down in Florida: Field Recordings of African American Traditional Music 1977–1980, highlights the significance of the previously unreleased material. In addition, it calls attention to the importance of the original LP and makes it available once again, this time to a larger audience. compiler bio : Dwight DeVane worked as a folklorist for the Florida Folklife Program from 1977 to 1982, and continued to serve as a folklife consultant until the mid-1980s. Dwight played a leading role in the research, fieldwork, and analysis that resulted in the original 1981 two-album LP, Drop on Down in Florida: Recent Field Recordings of Afro-American Traditional Music. He is currently a musician in Gainesville, Florida. Blaine Waide is the State Folklorist and director of the Florida Folklife Program, a position he has held since November 2010. He is responsible for presenting the folklife, folklore, and folk arts of the state, as documented through an annual fieldwork survey and other activities. He previously served for four-plus years as Managing Editor of Sing Out! magazine, the nation’s oldest folk music magazine.


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