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Space Dimension Controller

Planète Contraire

Beyond the Mikrosector, passed the Love Quadrant and over the Intersect lies another reality that exists in contrary to our own. This is where we now find Mr. 8040, the Space Dimension Controller, on a planète contraire, a world very much like our own, but one that runs in opposite to the norm. Here he toys with intergalactic Detroit funk and sequenced machines, creating celestial signals of minimalistic, atmospheric boogie. It’s a new course of interconnected, cinematic electro that exists outside of time and yet is apt for moments of timelessness.

Within the world of astrophysics there are select scientists out there that believe space-time gradually loops in on itself. Within this infinite realm of time and space, we can find ourselves once again living our past lives. It’s in this eternal domain that the Space Dimension Controller returns once more, applying his knowledge from the planète contraire to his absorbing palette of C-beams, moon-lit orchestrations, and graviton beats. Matured from his time cavorting through the core of the unknown, the Space Dimension Controller’s sound becomes more focussed, filled with the knowledge of the worlds his visited.

On the A side, Mr. 8040’s strain of progressive and unequivocal deep-space disco lends towards his studio competence, creating lush melodies that will have even the geysers of Enceladus erupting in time along with the symphony of syncopated drum machines. On the flipside, the prodigious Jack Hamill, aka. the Space Dimension Controller, flexes his machine savviness once more creating a timeless electro-funk rhythm for a timeless, time-travelling pioneer.

“Welcome / to my galaxy / of snare drum samples / full of emotions”

The year is 2019, and Jan Schulte is spelling out his vision in simple terms. Within the first few of Albumsi’s hour-plus runtime, our host lays out the mat, and welcomes us to the ‘Galaxy’, just as he welcomed us to ‘Zum Paradies’ on Instrumentalmusik von der Mitte der World. There, he donned a Wolf Müller mask. Here it is nom de doof, Bufiman. The directive is clear: buckle up, as this trip advisor for countless left-of-the-dial dancers and deep thinkers alike is back in the hot seat.

True to his word, the first thing that hits is the drums. Across the album are samples that Bufiman has been collecting since he was a mere Bufiboy. Recordings culled from market stalls 20+ years ago and song sketches that lay dormant since 2006 get a facelift at the Wolf Müller Flanger Studio and walk into the world as finished articles. A proggy tribute to funk classic ‘Blow Your Head’ takes this updating job most directly, transporting Fred Wesley & The J.B.’s to the fringes of a Frankfurt rave with a decanter of spiked punch, doin’ the worm through a space-time wormhole as they go.

Sometimes those drums jive away steadily, and sometimes they boom and bap right under your nose (and in the middle of the LP, they are barely present at all). Live instrumentation and digitised rat-a-tat link like brothers in arms. What might Mantronix sound like if they were from North Sentinel Island instead of New York City? Albumsi could be the answer.

This is the first record Bufiman has since leaving his day job of 11 years. It is the first made after touring and exploring some of the furthermost pockets of the globe – something that left a naturally great and greatly natural impression on him. A switch was flipped, he says, once he realised he could finally paint these pictures without pressure: “For the first time in my life I suddenly had a studio, a bit of gear and 3-4 days of time every week at once. Before I might have had one or two of these components, but never all at once.”

The resultant Albumsi is the most accurate measure of the ‘man to date. Thick waves of bass lap up at an exotic shoreline of greenery and indistinct birdsong. Tunes swell, ebb, crest and recede over 6, 8, 13 minutes at a time. Are we in Goa or Grafenburg? Rasping synthesisers taking off on ‘Well, Traumhaft’ and SFX like suction cups on ‘Hoolock Rock’ suggest the latter. But then, listen to the ecosystem of competing animal voices on ‘Apo-Calypso’ or the marriage of hand drums and wavering lead on ‘Pantasy’, and it’s impossible to be sure.

As ever, our host does not toil in studio solitude. Master mastering engineer Carsten Dämbkes brings the hi-def best out of the dense thicket of grooves. Close collaborators and friends like Niklas Rehme-Schlüter (Cass.), Lucas Croon, Nikolai Szymanski (Airchina), Alexander Dorn (Credit 00), Gregor Darman & Aki Vierboom (Phaser Boys), Sara Dudzinski Rodriguez and Florian Van Volxem variously add tweaks to the kit and compliments to the overall product.

Truly however, "Albumsi" begins and ends in the galaxy of Bufiman. With feet in the forests and head in the night sky, one arm pulling samples from the past and another jutting fingers into the future, the album is a rich stew of sounds, mantras and motifs and that have been simmering inside for a long, long time.

STAFF COMMENTS

Patrick says: Our main man Jan switches into disco drunkard mode with his ever goofy Bufi moniker, delivering a frankly MASSIVE LP for the Dekmantel family. Born out of a lifetime of drum samples and some sort of preternatural dance floor knowledge, "Albumsi" brings the breaks, serving retro-futurist rave with a cosmic twist. Mind melting, body moving brilliance from the Dusseldorf magician.

Dekmantel's hot streak continues as the imperious Dutch imprint follow up that killer Epsilove 12" with this blistering debut from Neon Chambers, the new collaboration between Kanding Ray and Sigha. Aiming to expand on their already impressive solo careers the two men have pooled hardware, sonic know-how and club experience to create this new audio-visual vehicle for studio and live enjoyment. 
The duo’s debut EP, "One" is a whirlwind of crushing modern sonics, that is equal parts jagged rave, progressive dub-fuelled two-step and night time-ethereal IDM. Throughout all five-tracks, the producers wield a wicked awareness of state-of-the-art sound design, that makes each kick cerebral, every bass-sound an epic vibration, and every synth a futuristic cacophony of finely-tuned noise. The sounds are an amalgamation of everything that has made each artistic unique in their own right, while correspondingly helping create something new. ‘Apollo’ is a prodigious working of melodic synthesis, with delicate, and rolling breaks, while ‘Cascade’ moves into a more grandiose, heavenly territory, befit with trance-like, precision synthesis. ‘What It Takes’ brings on board a more UK, post-dubstep sound, albeit one with more craft, and sonic mastership. ‘Your Touch’ toys once more with atmospheric rolling breaks and solemn vocal samples, while ‘Helles’, the closing track, is an excursion into more compelling, auditory realms.


STAFF COMMENTS

Matt says: Yup, it's Dekmantel, so you know it's gonna bang! Neon Chambers is a new one on me, but under the reasuring guidance of the label, they have of course, tickled my feathers somewhat here. You should also check it out.

Freedom Engine

A Box Full Of Magic

    Worthwhile albums tend to be as much about the process of making them as they are about the end products themselves. One can almost hear formal, technical, even philosophical questions being asked and answered on them in order to arrive at something personally and politically new for the artist. "A Box Full of Magic," at once sprawling, cosmic, and psychedelic in the best of ways, follows in this album-making tradition. It is a record steeped in off kilter percussive time, live recording, occasionally summer cloud-paced tempos, and lush, emotional, melodic instrumentation. "A Sunrise On the Front," the final track of the record (and a composition crushing in its beauty), encapsulates much of this: recorded live on a Rhodes, the melody gives voice to the paradoxical sense of hope even during the pathology of war.

    Such conceptual ambition fits perfectly well within the capacious vision of Mathew Jonson's Freedom Engine, a project whose very name seems to explore and allow for the conceptual paradox and complexity of approaching freedom through the engine of technology. In a fundamental sense this tension between freedom and machine informs much of the album proper. Desiring to break out of his old ways of production and the boxes that went with it, the album abounds with fresh fascinations in things like the sound of mathematical equations, quirky time signatures, and experimental phrasing through intuitive timings to unlock a sense of magic, play, and spontaneity. There is, likewise, an interest in the liberating potential of deconstructing old sounds to make new ones, as Jonson applies techniques like innovative noise gating on classic drum samples to create space age percussion. At other moments, on "The Very Strange," for instance, air itself is sampled in field recordings to create unnatural percussive patterns.

    As is often the case with Jonson's work, an encyclopedia of machines and synths are employed in the making of 'A Box Full of Magic," but what is perhaps new here, and in keeping with the dialectic he traces between freedom/engine, is that there is a non-mechanistic, spontaneous impulse at work in the recordings. While it is not a live album, it has an at times spiritual and organic inclination despite or perhaps because of the way his panoply of gear--Prophet 5, cs60, VCS3, et al--attempts to capture dream-like tonalities that can reach poetic heights on a track like the aforesaid "Sunrise" or morph into an almost diabolical, Lynchian dimension on "An Evil Charm (Where Is the Forest)." But while it is tempting to get lost in the trees of synth-arcana with Jonson's work, we should not lose sight of the forest here: With its openness to new ideas which in turn generate an album teeming with them, "Box Full of Magic" helps to expand the sonic vocabulary of contemporary dance music. Mathew Jonson lives and works in Berlin. He has been experimenting with electronic music since 1986.

    STAFF COMMENTS

    Barry says: Beautiful crisp Rhodes and blips of analogue synths work away beneath the sometimes frantic percussive backdrop, forming a perfectly balanced juxtaposition between airy ambience and euphoric electronica.

    French wielder of exotic machine music Epsilove debuts a full EP of sensuous, melodic electro on Dekmantel. Formerly one-half of Syracuse, Isabelle Maitre depicts a vision of daring, yet euphoric vocal-led, dreamy electro that oscillates with sturdier, warehouse sounds full of heaving 808s, and experimental qualities.

    ‘Time is the longest distance’ preaches the qualities that brought Antinote’s Epsilove to the distinguished status she has today. It is the sound of chic dancers, shuffling-together leisurely under neon lights, pressing against each other along to nostalgic acid basslines, interstellar synths, and dreamy, cinematic vocals. Rich with harmony, emotion, and cold-wave sensuality. ’Sea Snakes’ pulses faster under a Drexciyan dream-state, painting kaleidoscopic motifs, as the 808 rattles out multi-paced tempos, driving levels of uncompromising Detroit velocities, through to Lynchian-mirror-world listlessness. It’s an acid-acid test of colourful, pulsing electro.

    On the remixes are fellow Parisian’s Ali Bobo (Bruits De La Passion) and Shelter (Bigwax Records), who rework ‘Time is the longest distance’ into something more sinister, reflecting the dystopic IDM aesthetics of early Rephlex Records with playful, darkened electronics. The more elusive pairing of French producer HAJJ (Dawn Records) and Lastrack (BFDM) meanwhile, team up to turn ‘Sea Snakes’ into something that harkens towards the world of Warp-like experimental and progressive contemporary post-trap, and breakbeats.

    "À dix mètres sous moi, l'eau invisible. Entre l'eau et la brume, pas de frontière, la brume aussi lourde que l'eau, l'eau aussi irréelle que la brume. Passage dans un autre monde, transition par une osmose où toute forme ancienne est désagrégée et dissoute.” Raymond Abellio, Heureux les Pacifiques (1946)

    STAFF COMMENTS

    Patrick says: Dekmantel mine the fertile French scene for their latest release, inviting Epsilove to work her cosmic, coldwave magic across two electro-influenced cuts. The A1 brings the interplanetary drift for the cosmic clubkids, while 'Sea Snakes' is a snapping electro banger with a wriggling bassline. Featuring HAJJ, Lastrack, Ali Bobo and personal fave Shelter on remix duties, this is the complete package folks.

    The second edition of Dekmantel’s foray into the era-defining, trans-Atlantic, cult techno label that is Djax-Up-Beats, comes another re-issue of classic 90s cuts.

    The label say 'The Dutch label was responsible for releasing some of underground’s most foundational dance music, mixing together Chicago and European artists alike, and acting as the launchpad for some of today’s biggest producers. Featuring offerings from luminaries such as Felix Da Housecat, and Glenn Underground, alongside veterans such as Steve Poindexter, and DJ Skull, this second EP highlights the classic label’s old-school’s sound, while showcasing its diverse range, from dubbier, ambient moments, to wall-thumping, body crushing house force. Timeless music, repressed, and re-released for a new generation of DJs who covet the classic machine music.'

    This second volume offers a more introspective look at the label’s earlier releases. Terrace’s "Bewitched" kicks us off, to which DJ Richard has described as being the defining track of the label’s beginnings with its dreamy, Detroit-style techno mixed with the harder rave elements of Northern Europe. Glenn Underground’s bass-roller "Real Space" weaves together soulful passion and primo beats Chicago beats, while Felix Da Housecat’s "Temptation" - originally from 1993 - gets a well earned re-release, reminding us of the soulful, deep and lustful energy the producer once had. China White, whose name doesn’t get banded around as much as it should nowadays, see their ethereal hit "Theme from the Underground" get another opportunity to bliss out the more upbeat rave community before disc one comes to a close...

    The energy turns darker with Frank de Groodt’s The Operator alias, breaking the outer-most barriers of electro-techno, with "The Mind Strike". Chicago and Dance Mania’s Steve Poindexter turns out the shoulder-rolling, dance-energy bomb "Body Jam", while Mike Dearborn’s deliverance of unreal, dry techno in "Deviant Behaviour" runs aplomb with classic drum-machine pulses, claps, and uncomfortable, yet punishing melodies. DJ Skull’s "Don’t Stop The Beat" rides the EP with gushings of hand claps, and gentle, early 90s warm techno color, that transport you back to a time of more informed, and conscious electronic musings, a feeling that embodies Djax’s heyday.

    Founded in Eindhoven at the turn of the 90s, Djax-Up-Beats quickly earned an international reputation for being a key source of Chicago house, acid techno, and floor-filling, heavy-hitting, straight up underground 12”s. 


    Last year, Dekmental got together with The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision’s RE:VIVE initiative for the second time, inviting four local artists to breathe new life into four archival films from the Sound and Vision and EYE Filmmuseum archives. Jordan GCZ, Suzanne Kraft, Parrish Smith and Upsammy were all assigned short animated films dating back to 1921. The films and their new scores debuted at EYE on August 2nd as part of Dekmantel Festival 2018. Unsurprisingly, each artist imparted their unique styles onto the films that they previously had no relation with. From Suzanne Kraft's sparse atmospherics that have become more apparent in his new SK U KNO project to Jordan GCZ’s free flowing hardware jams. Parrish Smith showed his contemplative side and sparse orchestrations that he demonstrated on his RE:VIVE release, "Genesis Black", a sonic departure from his bombastic releases and DJ-sets while upsammy showed yet again her deft hand for melody and texture, a style that dominates all her releases to date.

    These four scores can live apart from their films, fitting seamlessly into each artists' growing catalogs of work. But when combined, it’s as if the films and music were made simultaneously with the artist and filmmaker together in the same room. It shows off a more contemplative, dare-I-say-it, artistic side to the label that could be misunderstood as just a young person's dance music brand and festival. Dekmantel seem eager to add to the creative forces existing in dance music, reinventing and improving on areas and preventing themselves becoming tried and stale. They should be celebrated as solid baton bearers of the scene, even as they achieve more commercial success. 


    Bufiman

    Peace Moves - Inc. DJ Normal 4 Remix

      Piccadilly favourite, video game fanatic and former breakdance champ Jan Schulte makes his Dekmantel debut with "Peace Moves", an EP of percussive soul, that captures the Salon Des Amateurs resident in full, tribal swing. Blasting out the A-side with tough body moving breaks, rasping vocal idents and skewed synth riffery, the main mix of "Peace Moves" harnesses the 5 a.m. insanity of a mushroom fuelled romp, deploying a Tri Atma style 12 string riff to totally trip the hippie dancers out. Breakbeat king and previous collaborator DJ Normal drops by on the A2, taking the intensity up a notch with a 'back to the oldschool', 'carpark in North Manchester', 'pocket full of pingers' 'ardcore mix complete with nagging bass, synth strings and more energy than a whizzed up all nighter at R&S HQ, 1993. Over on the flip, Bufi brings the euphoria with a medicated, manipulated dream-house flip on "Peace Moves", infusing the OG with doped up sequences and sultry incense tinged pads. Saving my personal favourite til last, Jan hits us with "Graffiti Moves", a kaleidoscopic vision of cut up funk breaks, tribal percussion, ring modulated leadlines and well wonky fx abuse. Expect to hear this on the Talking Drums dancefloor very soon.

      FORMAT INFORMATION

      12" Info: 1 COPY FOUND!

      Now for a trip into an impossible land, generated on a hacked copy of Populous, wrought out of melting circuitry and bootlegged YMO LPs, projected on early green screen and filled with failed CGI from the Waterworld era. Panagiotis Melidis and Stathis Kalatzis are Territroy, the newest member of the Dekmantel family, and the creative insanity behind the newest UFO release, "Skulls & Plants". Now, I don't recall taking a massive dose of 4-AcO this morning with my cornflakes, but that may well have happened, as this is one trippy listen. At various points EBM, tropical house, machine voodoo and shamanic breaks are twisted, warped and frazzled, all achieving the demented sound signature of this lunatic Grecian duo. Rhythms collapse, stutter skip and slur, crispy distortion coats otherwise healthy melodies and oddly exotic idents flutter across the landscape, though you could never be certain they were there. Highly psychoactive electronics and primal rhythms for fans of Helena Hauff, Detlef, Lena Willikens and the Silk Road.


      It's a Piccadilly debut for Dutch production Lamellen here, who join the ever swelling ranks of the Dekmantel family with a five tracker of atmospheric, emotive and groovy Balearic house. Keeping true to the original island ideal, the duo barely break a sweat over 100bpm, keeping it easy and breezy as they provide the perfect soundtrack for sundowners the globe over. 
      A tranquil and trippy opener, "Horse Massage" calls to mind the cosmic explorations of Farbror Resande Mac, all space port idents, sparkling sequences and slow moving bass tones. "Spider" ups the tempo to a comparitive sprint (though still in reality glacial), injecting a little 80s Italo funk into the bassline, toughening the percussion up a bit and adding some glassy mallet tones for a nu disco-tinged heater. "Oyster" takes the intensity back down, savouring the same nebulous vibrations as the opener, but with a fresh Oceanic twist - think A Vision Of Panorama and you won't be too far away. 
      So far so 4/4, and the duo throw us a curious curveball with the skipping rhythm, tropical bubble and chiming chords of proggy pearl "Railrunner". We're back in the deep to close as the duo deliver "Pippo Denemarken" a downbeat shuffler decorated with insistent organ tones and bright and glassy synths. Luscious stuff from the Dekmantal debutants.

      STAFF COMMENTS

      Patrick says: The eagle eared selectors at Dekmantel introduce us to more fresh talent, namely Dutch duo Lamellen, who drop the tempo and up the groove for a quintet of synth heavy Balearic jams. Cocktail killers folks.

      Moving on from their time holed up in a leisure resort relic, the Dutch retrogressive, analogue synth machine obsessives and tape fanatics Betonkust & Palmbomen II have teamed up together once more for a new EP.

      An immediate follow up to their debut LP "Center Parcs", the new EP pays fictional homage to a now deceased famous TV star, who instead on working on the screen, took up a new direction in making music. More replete with esoteric experimentalism, analogue jams, drums machines, synths, and a healthy dose of acid basslines, the production duo advance upon their aesthetic with a new extended EP of nostalgic, melancholic electro.

      With Palmbomen II aka Kai Hugo, based out and working in Los Angeles, collaborations with Dutch-based partner Betonkust happen less frequently than they should - especially when you acknowledge that they do not use, or record to computers. When they do happen though, their distinctive sonic palette of saturated distortion and warm melodic waves shine through. This time recorded in a bungle somewhere in the Dutch countryside, the two producers have created a concept record about Bart, a local hero and his imagined life in a parallel universe. In this reality, instead of making it in TV, Bart is a successful music producer, the track titles detailing his journey through this new and imagined life. "Bart Is Alone Again" kicks off the record with its wistful melodies, and harmonic leads, before "Underground Dance Floor" kicks in with its predominate bassline, and squelching deep-rooted, undercurrents of hardcore. Along Bart’s odyssey there are moments for "Bart's Jam", an early days Warp Records / Detroit belter; "Rejected Demo Tape" a downbeat moment of anguish; ending with "A Series of Bad Decisions," in which the EP plays out to somber, yet harmonious conclusion.


      STAFF COMMENTS

      Matt says: Lo-fi tape sizzlers from this creative pairing who impart a level of evocative narrative through the six track journey. A must for fans of Legowelt, Person Of Interest & Ed DMX, fans of the recent RAMZi are also gonna enjoy this.

      Randomer

      Slicing

        UK DJ and producer Rohan Walder, aka Randomer furthers his exploration into deep, spatial techno on Dekmantel’s UFO imprint. Fusing together two-step rhythms, cavernous beats, distortion, layered kicks, and an attentive detail to sound design, Randomer delivers an uncompromising array of abstract and destructive techno tracks.

        Randomer’s approach to techno has always maintained a bassier, obtuse approach to sound, with polyrhythmic beats that have helped set his sonic identity apart from his peers. Having released the "Running Dry EP" on DKMNTL UFO in 2016, Randomer is firmly establishing himself as one of the label’s favourite artists, with a resounding appearance at the Dekmantel festival in São Paulo, and a prime slot awaiting for him in the UFO tent at this year’s festival in Amsterdam (happenin' this very weekend! - ed)

        Kicking off with "Van Pelt", which skips along at just over 130bmp and textured with kicks that sound like two robust, metal dumpsters being hit together. Littered in the background are gongs, random percussive sounds, and something very alien, making it the perfect track for the UFO tent. "Shadow Harp" is quintessential UK techno, with yet more thudding, dark-kicks layered against a syncopated plucked and jarring bass. Birmingham would be proud! "Dissolve" drips and oozes with a sunken undercurrent of dystopic-melancholy, driving in ruptured reverb with a tribal percussive foundation. Final track "Slicing" dares to take things a little further, as the rounded-hollow kicks punctuate against more metallic, and analogue sounds - like a war of machines, set to a rhythm of abstract, free-flowing gust of techno cuts. Throughout the four-tracks, Randomer showcases his innate ability to excite and surprise with dynamism, and cutting sounds, with a technique that has been well-honed throughout the years. As he stated in an interview with Resident Advisor in 2016; 'Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.'


        FORMAT INFORMATION

        12" Info: One copy available

        Recorded in an ageing holiday park during off-season, "Center Parcs" is the debut LP by Dutch artists Betonkust & Palmbomen II; a conceptual, musical-tristesse full of lo-fi harmony and fanciful, psychedelic-coloured modulations. With an undercurrent of in-vogue saturation - beats, vintage synths and the omnipresent gnarl of the Roland 303 - all recorded to tape. the duo have crafted an LP of esoteric-electronic-pop, reflective of the time the two spent holed-up in isolation, in the out-of-time Center Parcs setting.

        'It’s a weird environment, but we like it,' Palmbomen II says about "Center Parcs", where the album was recorded. Originally built in the 70s, Center Parcs De Eemhof in Zeewolde provides a pseudo-tropical environment for vacationing families, with an ageing, ersatz jungle; its faux decor gradually fading to grey. Recorded during the winter, the two Dutch men took-up home in one the park’s chalets with select hardware - predominately synths and drum machines - and recorded all of their progress to tape. Being the only occupants in the melancholic, somber settings, the duo made an LP that was reflective of the unpretentious surroundings. 'Some people think it’s ironic, but this is not a tongue-in-cheek joke,' Hugo says about the record. 'There’s sadness here that people try not to hide.'

        Everything on "Center Parcs" was recorded on hardware, in the moment; 'real jams' as the guys describe them. No computers. It was through this in-the-present-process that led to the recondite, lo-fi shoegaze record, reflective of their shared influences - from the likes of I-F. through to Cocteau Twins.

        Opener "24x33", has a reverberated VHS aesthetic; "De rust die je zocht"('The peace you were looking for') sounds like an angelic score to a forgotten family game show; "Nintendo Pantera" a solemn, upbeat Detroit-retroffited-vapourware melody. The album is a follow up to the "Center Parcs EP" - the producer’s debut cassette release on Canadian label 1080p in 2016. This will be the first time that these tracks have been made widely available, and on vinyl release, and is seen by both artists as a chance to expand on the moment that they captured together - to share the beautiful-tristesse with all.


        STAFF COMMENTS

        Matt says: Proper feelin' this concept me. If anyone wants to rent a chalet in Southport Pontins this winter and make some lo-fi gabber with me - you know where to find me... x


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