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CAITLIN ROSE

Caitlin Rose

Johnny Velvet / Carried Away (Demo) (RSD23 EDITION)

    THIS IS A RECORD STORE DAY 2023 EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED TO ONE PER PERSON.

    Caitlin Rose releases a special limited 7" Vinyl for Record Store Day 2023. The 500 unit Limited 'Cherry Red' Coloured 7" release features two exclusive tracks recorded during the sessions for Caitlinís new critically acclaimed album 'CAZIMI'. New Track 'Johnny Velvet' and the demo version of 'Carried Away (Demo)í will be available for fans for the first time as exclusive to this 7" release.

    Caitlin Rose

    CAZIMI

      In February of 2020, singer-songwriter Caitlin Rose settled in at Nashville’s Sound Emporium Studios for a week of tracking with William Tyler, Brian Kotzur, Jack Lawrence, and Luke Schneider. After a seven year absence following the release of her sophomore LP, The Stand-In—a self-described Sisyphean nightmare of false starts and career blocks—Rose was ready, with the encouragement of close friend and producer Jordan Lehning, to give the rock a final push. “It happened so fast that there was no time to worry about what could go wrong; all I walked in with was the excitement,” she says. When she and Lehning planned to return for overdubs in early March, neither expected that the world would turn on its head in little more than a week, that a tornado would soon wipe half of east Nashville off the map, or a global pandemic would, as it has for so many others’ projects, further delay completion.

      Paradoxically, though, sitting with her songs a little longer turned out to be exactly what Rose needed. “I had all the pieces,” she says. “It just took a while to make them fit. The initial charge of going into the studio with people I trusted and seeing it through was so inspiring, and then the world just stopped. It was a terrifying shift, but Jordan set the path for us and figured out how to utilize this new uncomfortable freedom of time. It led to a process more joyful than any I’ve experienced making music.”

      The resulting record, CAZIMI, finds itself released into the world at the exact right time. We’re not quite post-pandemic but we’re certainly post-vibe shift. Things are falling apart, systems are failing in front of us; chaos and danger await us the moment we step out our front doors. The perpetual mood is that of a constant hum of anxiety as we try to cope, with varying degrees of success, with the collective trauma that has consumed us unrelentingly for the past few years.

      Taking its title from the astrological term for when a planet is in such close, specific proximity to the sun that it’s considered to be in the heart of it, CAZIMI finds the listener at the moment with its examination of trauma, chronicling “the slow motion unraveling of somebody’s life” in the aftermath. The thing about cazimi is that it’s fleeting, accidental, even—a moment of exaltation that goes just as fast as it comes. It’s a phenomenon that Rose could relate to: “I was never prepared to take on everything that happened to me in my early twenties. Being all of a sudden thrust into spotlights that I had little business being under was rarely empowering, often more so debilitating, and being in the rush of it all, I never could quite catch up,” she explains. “I was living that ‘combust to the sun’ narrative and the burnout was inevitable”

      A standout staple of Nashville’s rock scene, Rose is “witty, brilliant company” (Pitchfork) and a “promisingly wry lyricist” (The Guardian) with a “wily and impressive blend of melancholy and cheek.” (New York Times) Her 2011 full-length Own Side Now earned her praise for her “sweet, knowing voice and a penchant for lyrics that are far darker” (New York Times), nestled in “simply adorned song-craft which…never seem constrained by Nashville tropes, old or new.” (BBC Music)

      STAFF COMMENTS

      Barry says: In many ways, it seems like Caitlin Rose's brand of swooning country music is reasonably traditional, but its when the songs open up into bracing pop progressions and bright, soaring ballads that Rose's skill really shows. Wonderfully new take on the tried-and-tested Nashville formula, and most importantly, a wonderful listen without being too familiar.

      TRACK LISTING

      1. Carried Away
      2. Modern Dancing
      3. Getting It Right
      4. Nobody’s Sweetheart
      5. Lil’ Vesta
      6. Black Obsidian
      7. How Far Away
      8. Blameless
      9. Gemini Moon
      10. All Right (Baby’s Got A Way)
      11. Holdin’
      12. Only Lies

      Caitlin Rose

      Own Side Now (Deluxe 10 Year Anniversary Edition)

        Nashville in 2010 was a time and place bristling with potential. Before the coastal dailies and culture mags had declared our town an “it city” — before rampant development was putting tall-and-skinny new-builds on every block and courting out-of-towners with mixed-use nonsense and vapid murals.

        Nashville has long been characterized by a sort of underdog spirit, and in 2010, that spirit was in full display at DIY punk venues, run-down honky-tonks and hole-in-the-wall dives. Over in East Nashville’s Lockeland Springs neighborhood, a handful of us lived in a century-old home that we called Holly House. Even more of us gathered there, musicians and artists who decided to form a collective of the same name, a half-dozen or so bands hopping on shows together, playing on each other’s records, calling meetings as an excuse to drink beer and talk shop.

        Most of those bands are long-gone, but not Caitlin Rose. Then as now, Caitlin — my roommate and fellow Holly House member — shined bright as a songwriter and performer.

        I first started seeing Caitlin play when she was around 16 or 17 years old, toting her guitar and tambourine to house shows and public parks and an all-ages punk venue downtown called The Muse, which has since been replaced by a Domino’s Pizza. I came to know her as “Cato,” a funny, brainy little weirdo with an outsized voice and ferocious collection of brilliant punky folk songs. I remember a question that would pop up from people in the crowd at various points throughout her performances, without fail: “Is this song a cover?” Caitlin was making songs that were so good, so memorable, so emotionally mature, that folks couldn’t believe they’d been written by a teen. I always grinned when I overheard someone asking the question.

        With time, Caitlin’s sound evolved — her approach to songwriting, her influences, her embrace of country music as an idiom she really excelled at. The collection of songs she was creating back in our Holly House days, a collection that would ultimately become Own Side Now, showcased Caitlin’s preternatural knack for taking a moment — an emotion, an experience, an interaction — and bottling it, turning it into something listeners can experience for themselves.

        The achingly lonesome “For the Rabbits” and “Sinful Wishing Well.” The tender, sprawling “Own Side.” The satisfying nostalgia of the intoxicatingly upbeat “Shanghai Cigarettes.” I remember Caitlin honing these songs in clubs and on tours, tweaking the arrangements with her world-class band. I must’ve seen Caitlin play “Spare Me” and “T-Shirt” dozens of times, and while no two performances were exactly the same, each one was a little bit closer to where it would ultimately land. She was always orbiting the perfect version of a song she’d been pouring her heart into for months or years. Own Side Now was the product of that long journey.

        Now, 10 years since the initial release of Own Side Now, it’s moving to listen back to these potent songs and remember our time in Holly House, and our time at DIY spaces and punk clubs and dives that no longer exist. As you listen, maybe you’ll recall where you were in life when you first heard Caitlin’s music. Or maybe you’re listening for the first time, discovering a batch of songs that you can connect to in a personal way. Whether it’s your first listen or your 1,000th, this is an exceptional album made by an artist truly coming into her own. Enjoy it.


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