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ERIC COPELAND

I've never met him, but I'm fairly certain Eric Copeland is a total lunatic. Don't get me wrong, he dealt in the deranged during his time in Black Dice, but since going solo on our ass, the NYC musician has disappeared through the looking glass. Wrong speed brain mulch, queasy tape loops, jacking perx, all brought together with the same narcotic glee you find at the heart of the darkweb.
This time out Eric delivers "Trogg Modal Vol. 2" pushing his 'Freakbeat 4/4' envelope further than ever before. Self-described as “late Night Flight proto tekno,” the tracks pulse with thick layers of percussion, melodic fever dreams, and riffs wrung through a taffy puller.
Opener "Beat It" is less a reference to a lately disgraced child molesting popstar, and instead a slamming combo of girthy bass and kick, red lining hats and overlapping synth work - generally as demented as it is danceable. "High Score Zed" scoots down the coin slot of a Jamaican arcade game, blasting out a high speed hybrid of digi-dancehall and 8-bit funk, while "United Banana" slides a morbidly obese bass sound under dreamy pads and crashing cymbals for some unorthodox house bizz. A-side closer "Pay Off" is optimistic, off kilter and kinda nonsensical in the best way possible - play this and put your lampshade on your head. Over on the flipside "BS Dropout" stomps and squelches like Krang in a washing machine, "Light Fantastic" flips e-funk and new wave into a new form of drug addled wrongness (Super intense!) and "Blazin" sounds like Mr Fingers after 7 bottles of cough syrup. Last but not least "Falo" picks up the videogame vibe, recreating a Sonic in the labyrinth ambiance but with way more bitrate. Top notch weirdshit from my favourite experimentalist.


TRACK LISTING

01. Beat It
02. High Score Zed
03. United Banana
04. Pay Off
05. BS Dropout
06. Light Fantastic
07. Blazin
08. Falo

Eric Copeland

Courtesy, Professionalism, Respect

Copeland brings the (schizoid, neon, frenetic) noise for his newest LP on L.I.E.S. Kicking things off with the juddering lo-fi stomp of 'Convoy', pushing hi-passed snares and delayed synth squeals through the mincer and ending up with some mechanically recovered heat, slavered liberally atop a solid foundation of mealy kicks and shuffled hats. 'Qualified' continues where we left off where vox are concerned, taking the mean voice of a hundred robots and gating them with some brutal sample & hold abstractions. In case this wasn't enough of thematic giveaway, bit-crushed synths fire off like lasers into the neon-lit heavens, turning the casual romp through the dystopian wilderness into a climactic white-knuckle boss-fight. 
Moving further along, and 'Doggy' presents the first indication of rhythmic convention, with lithe bass fragents flickering over a classic four-to-the-floor percussive backdrop before pulling out the flicker-machine once again to heavily treat the melodic overtones into a brittle amalgam of crystalline pulses and terse filter cuts. 
'Ultimo' veers into lite grime territory with sqelchy digital synths weaving their way around the cut-up vocal snippets and tinny flanged cymbals (it would sound great blaring out of a nokia speaker on the back of the 168). Brilliantly futuristic but with nods to everything that has secured its passage up to this point. Copeland has always pushed the boundaries, and this is no different, it just so happens that his boundary pushing has veered squarely into the wonky lo-fi house/techno/misc zone I find so appealing. RIYL Opal Tapes / Cloudface / SNES.  

STAFF COMMENTS

Barry says: Brilliantly eccentric soundtrack to futuristic mishaps, last-life white-knuckle gaming and dusty sampler glitches. Superb.

TRACK LISTING

1. Convoy
2. Qualified
3. Chinatown
4. Doggy
5. Oopsy Dazee
6. Following The Man
7. Ultimo
8. From The Hip
9. Flipper
10. Copacabana
11. Big Wheel
12. Larry Of Acadia 

Eric Copeland

Alien In A Garbage Dump

Eric Copeland is a founding member of New York's Black Dice. "Alien In A Garbage Dump" represents almost two years of basement jamming and collecting. At the same time he was immersed in two Black Dice albums. Consequently, there are obvious parallels in the results; an uncompromised sonic landscape. But alone, Copeland has found places one can only find alone: small inner dialogues and isolated mind caves where the idea may only last a moment, but he captures and tweaks it into a fragment of many memories. "Alien" proves to be a strangely curated time capsule of OUR time right NOW; music where birds beat-box with car-stereo subwoofers and the neighbours' espanol sings on top the Sabbath siren. With all this going on, Copeland sometimes disappears into the anonymity, playing a 'behind-the-scenes' role, pushing cords and pulling buttons, laughing because the batteries are dying. The result is a collection of songs at once uniquely urban but still strangely universal in language. Fifteen years strong in the game and somehow it's easier to see where his music is going as opposed to where it's been. The first seven songs of this release appeared as a vinyl EP by the same name put out by Paw Tracks last year. The last six songs appear as a vinyl EP named "Al Anon" put out by Catsup Plate.


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