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ALICE COLTRANE

Alice Coltrane

The Carnegie Hall Concert

    Kicking off what will be an Alice Coltrane year with more releases to come in the next 12 months, is a previously unreleased, killer live recording from 1971. Recorded live, by Impulse! at a charity gala given at Carnegie Hall for the benefit of the Integral Yoga Institute in 1971, this incredible set never saw commercial release until now. The gala concert was one of two halves with the first two transcendental tunes by Alice taken from the album she had just released on Impulse! and then two explosive tunes by her late husband John Coltrane. Naturally, à la Coltrane/Dolphy at the Gate, which picked up the recent Grammy nomination for Best Liner Notes, the package includes some knockout editorial, with essays by Lauren Du Graf and Alice’s producer Ed Michel. 

    TRACK LISTING

    Journey In Satchidananda
    Shiva-Loka
    Africa
    Leo 

    Alice Coltrane

    World Spirituality Classics 1: The Ecstatic Music Of Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda - 2023 Repress

      As some of you may know, Alice Coltrane was a legendary pianist, composer, spiritual leader, and the wife of John Coltrane, the most venerated and influential saxophonist in the history of jazz. In 1967, four years after meeting John, he died of liver cancer, leaving Alice a widow with four small children. Bereft of her soul mate, Alice suffered sleepless nights and severe weight loss. At her worst, she weighed only 95 pounds. She had hallucinations in which trees spoke, various beings existed on astral planes, and the sounds of “a planetary ether” spun through her brain, knocking her into a frightening unconsciousness.

      The critical event of this period was not that Alice fell into the nadir of her existence, but rather that she experienced tapas, a vital period of trial. These tapas (a Sanskrit term she used to describe her suffering) helped prepare Alice for the spiritual ally she found in Swami Satchidananda, an Indian guru, with whom Alice made her first trip to India. On her second trip there, Alice had a revelation instructing her to abandon the secular life and become a spiritual teacher in the Hindu tradition – so she moved out West – eventually opening the Shanti Anantam Ashram on 47 acres she’d bought in Agoura Hills, California.

      Music was the foundation of Alice’s spiritual practice. From the mid 1980’s to mid 1990’s, Alice Coltrane self-released four brilliant cassette albums. These cassettes contained a music she invented, inspired by the gospel music of the Detroit churches she grew up in, mixed together with the Indian devotional music of her religious practice, and even finds Alice singing for the first time in her recorded catalog. Originally only made available through her ashram, they are her most obscure body of work and possibly the greatest reflection of her soul.

      TRACK LISTING

      1. Om Rama
      2. Om Shanti
      3. Rama Rama
      4. Rama Guru
      5. Hari Narayan
      6. Journey To Satchidananda
      7. Er Ra
      8. Keshava Murahara
      9. Krishna Japaye*
      10. Rama Katha

      Alice Coltrane

      Journey In Satchidananda - Acoustic Sounds Series Edition

        One of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, Alice Coltrane’s fourth Impulse! album finds her on piano and harp in the company of saxophonist Pharoah Sanders. "Almost 50 years after [it] was released, the album remains a vision of universal healing, spiritual self-preservation in times of trouble and the god that appears when you seek her out." (NPR)

        Verve’s Acoustic Sounds Series features transfers from analog tapes and remastered 180-gram vinyl in deluxe gatefold packaging.

        TRACK LISTING

        Side A
        1. Journey In Satchidananda
        2. Shiva-Loka
        3. Stopover Bombay
        Side B
        1. Something About John Coltrane
        2. Isis And Osiris (rec. Live)


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