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THE BEATLES

Television Personalities

They Could Have Been Bigger Than The Beatles - Restored Art Edition

    Originally released in 1982, ‘They Could Have Been Bigger Than The Beatles’ was the influential band’s third album. A collection of singles, demos, outtakes and rarities that was intended to mark the band's breakup in 1982, had they not got back together again so soon. This 2024 reissue comes with faithfully restored artwork, from one the album’s original hand painted sleeves.

    The record features ‘David Hockney's Diaries’, ‘The Boy In The Paisley Shirt’ and ‘Psychedelic Holiday’. With the formidable Daniel Treacy at its core, Television Personalities remain one of new wave’s longest serving and seminal artists, with a career spanning over three decades. The indie pop visionaries have influenced many people across the industry including Pavement, The Lemonheads, Fat White Family, MGMT and Creation Records’ Alan McGee.

    “Its scope is incredible, its ambition outstanding and its heart damn near broken.” Melody Maker.

    TRACK LISTING

    Side A
    A1. Three Wishes
    A2. David Hockney's Diary
    A3. In A Perfumed Garden
    A4. Flowers For Abigail
    A5. King And Country
    A6. The Boy In The Paisley Shirt
    A7. Games For Boys

    Side B
    B1. Painter Men
    B2. Psychedelic Holiday
    B3. 14th Floor
    B4. Sooty's Disco Party
    B5. Makin' Time
    B6. When Emily Cries
    B7. The Glittering Prizes
    B8. Anxiety Block
    B9. Mysterious Ways 

    The Beatles

    1962-1966 (The Red Album) + 1967-1970 (The Blue Album) - 2023 Edition

      These landmark compilations have introduced generations of fans to the incredible history of the most storied band in music. For its 50th anniversary, the collections have been expanded: ‘Red’ has 12 additional tracks, including for the first time some of George Harrison’s earliest songs and some classic Beatles versions of R&B and rock ‘n’ roll hits that were so influential on the band. ‘Blue’ has 9 additional tracks including “Blackbird” and “Glass Onion” including the last new Beatles song, “Now And Then” for a total of 21 new additions which are all compiled onto the 3rd disc, effectively creating a ‘new’ LP for each set.

      Together the 6LP’s contain 75 tracks, 36 of which have new mixes for 2023. The inserts contains new sleeve notes by journalist and author John Harris. For current fans and future generations alike, the new 1962 – 1966 & 1967 - 1970 collections are a joyous celebration of The Beatles’ timeless musical legacy.

      The Beatles

      1962-1966 (The Red Album) - 2023 Edition

        This landmark compilation has introduced generations of fans to the incredible history of the most storied band in music. For its 50th anniversary, the collection has been expanded with 12 additional tracks, including for the first time some of George Harrison’s earliest songs and some classic Beatles versions of R&B and rock ‘n’ roll hits that were so influential on the band. 

        The 3LP collection now contains 38 tracks, 30 of which have new mixes for 2023. The set’s 12 newly added tracks are collected on its 3rd LP. An insert contains new sleeve notes by journalist and author John Harris. For current fans and future generations alike, the new 1962 – 1966 collection is a joyous celebration of The Beatles’ timeless musical legacy.

        The 2CD collection now contains 38 tracks, 30 of which have new mixes for 2023. The booklet contains new sleeve notes by journalist and author John Harris. For current fans and future generations alike, the new 1962 – 1966 collection is a joyous celebration of The Beatles’ timeless musical legacy.

        The Beatles

        1967-1970 (The Blue Album) - 2023 Edition

          This landmark compilation has introduced generations of fans to the incredible history of the most storied band in music. For its 50th anniversary, the collection has been expanded with 9 additional tracks added chronologically, including “Blackbird”, “Glass Onion” and the new song, “Now And Then”. The last Beatles song, “Now And Then” completes John Lennon’s 1970s vocal and piano demo recording with parts played by Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, as well as a new arrangement for strings.

          The 3LP collection now features 37 tracks, 6 of which have new mixes for 2023. The set’s 9 newly added tracks are collected on its 3rd LP. An insert contains new sleeve notes by journalist and author John Harris. For current fans and future generations alike, the new 1966 – 1970 collection is a joyous celebration of The Beatles’ timeless musical legacy.

          The 2CD collection now features 37 tracks, 6 of which have new mixes for 2023. The booklet contains new sleeve notes by journalist and author John Harris. For current fans and future generations alike, the new 1966 – 1970 collection is a joyous celebration of The Beatles’ timeless musical legacy.

          The Beatles

          Now And Then / Love Me Do

            The Beatles’ double-A-side single for “Now And Then” and “Love Me Do” pairs the last Beatles song with the band’s first UK single. Powerful musical bookends to The Beatles’ recorded canon, both songs are also featured in the expanded Anniversary Editions for 1962-1966 (‘The Red Album’) and 1967-1970 (‘The Blue Album’).

            “Now And Then”
            “Now And Then” is the last Beatles song, written and demoed by John Lennon in the mid/late 1970s. With John’s voice now pristine in the mix, “Now And Then” features elements from the 1995 sessions including George Harrison’s guitar parts, and vocal and instrumental parts recorded by Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr in 2022, along with a new arrangement for strings. Produced by Paul and Giles Martin, “Now And Then” is the last song recorded by all four Beatles, a powerful and fitting finale for the band’s timeless recordings.

            “Love Me Do”
            The song that started it all, “Love Me Do” was The Beatles’ first UK single in 1962. For the first time, the iconic song has been de-mixed using machine aided learning and remixed in true stereo. “Love Me Do” launched The Beatles’ journey to unparalleled worldwide success and acclaim that continues to this day.

            Lesley-Ann Jones

            Fly Away Paul : The Extraordinary Story Of How Paul McCartney Survived The Beatles And Found His Wings

              the remarkable account of Paul McCartney's time in Wings and ascent into solo stardom, by renowned music biographer Lesley-Ann JonesNo comprehensive biography of the time Paul McCartney spent with Wings has ever been published, until now. A period often dismissed as McCartney's 'missing' years, in fact the band lasted for a decade: two years longer than the Beatles, and wielded such impact and influence that they at one point achieved the status as the biggest live band in the world. Band on the Run sold over 6 million copies worldwide and became EMI's biggest selling album of the 1970s in the UK.

              Music biographer Lesley-Ann Jones has met McCartney many times and knew his late wife Linda. Here she shows how crucial Linda was to the evolution of Wings - at great cost to herself given the ridicule she was to encounter. But Linda saw that McCartney needed the band in the wake of the break up of the Beatles.

              Drawing on extensive interviews and her trademark meticulous research, the author shows how this period in Paul McCartney's career was to become crucial not only to his development as an artist, but to his very survival.

              The Beatles

              Revolver - 2022 Reissue

                Turn off your mind, relax and float downstream…

                London - September 7, 2022 – Revolver: The Beatles’ 1966 album that changed everything. Spinning popular music off its axis and ushering in a vibrant new era of experimental, avant-garde sonic psychedelia, Revolver brought about a cultural sea change and marked an important turn in The Beatles’ own creative evolution. With Revolver, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr set sail together across a new musical sea.

                The Revolver album’s 14 tracks have been newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and engineer Sam Okell in stereo and Dolby Atmos, and the album’s original mono mix is sourced from its 1966 mono master tape. Revolver’s sweeping new Special Edition follows the universally acclaimed remixed and expanded Special Editions of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (2017), The BEATLES (‘White Album’) (2018), Abbey Road (2019), and Let It Be (2021).

                All the new Revolver releases feature the album’s new stereo mix, sourced directly from the original four-track master tapes. The audio is brought forth in stunning clarity with the help of cutting edge de-mixing technology developed by the award-winning sound team led by Emile de la Rey at Peter Jackson’s WingNut Films Productions Ltd. The physical and digital Super Deluxe collections also feature the album’s original mono mix, 28 early takes from the sessions and three home demos, and a four-track EP with new stereo mixes and remastered original mono mixes for “Paperback Writer” and “Rain”. The album’s new Dolby Atmos mix will be released digitally.

                Revolver Special Edition Super Deluxe 5CD
                This Special Edition of The Beatles’ REVOLVER features a new mix by Giles Martin and Sam Okell, plus the original mono mix, a 4-track EP, 31 session takes and home demos, a 100-page book with a foreword by Paul McCartney, an essay by Questlove, detailed track notes, photos and ephemera including handwritten lyrics, tape boxes and extracts from Klaus Voormann’s graphic novel on the making of the cover art. On 5 CDs in a 12.56” x 12.36” slipcase.

                Revolver Special Edition Super Deluxe 4LP + 7” Vinyl EP
                This Special Edition of The Beatles’ REVOLVER features a new mix by Giles Martin and Sam Okell, the original mono mix, a 4-track EP, 31 session takes and home demos, a 100-page book with a foreword by Paul McCartney, an essay by Questlove, detailed track notes, photos and ephemera including handwritten lyrics, tape boxes and extracts from Klaus Voormann’s graphic novel on the making of the cover art. Half-speed-mastered 180g LPs + 7-inch vinyl EP in a 12.56” x 12.36” slipcase.

                Revolver Special Edition Deluxe 2CD
                This 2CD Special Edition of The Beatles’ REVOLVER features a new mix by Giles Martin and Sam Okell, plus a disc of highlights from the album sessions that includes early versions of songs that deepen and expand the story of the album, as well as new stereo mixes of the non-album single, “Paperback Writer” and “Rain,” and a 40-page booklet with detailed info and rare photos.

                Revolver Special Edition 1CD
                From “Taxman” to “Tomorrow Never Knows,” The Beatles’ REVOLVER has been newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and Sam Okell, and sourced directly from the original four-track master tapes with audio brought forth in stunning clarity with the help of cutting-edge technology developed by the award-winning sound team at Peter Jackson’s WingNut Films Productions Ltd.

                Revolver Special Edition 1LP Vinyl
                From “Taxman” to “Tomorrow Never Knows,” The Beatles’ REVOLVER has been newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and Sam Okell, and sourced directly from the original four-track master tapes with audio brought forth in stunning clarity with the help of cutting-edge technology developed by the award-winning sound team at Peter Jackson’s WingNut Films Productions Ltd. Now available on 180g vinyl.

                STAFF COMMENTS

                Andy says: Revolver is the moment where the Beatles turned their back on the hysteria and announced they weren't going to tour anymore, but instead were going to concentrate solely on The Music. Out went boy-meets-girl and any country or rock'n'roll songs, in came psychedelic pop with deep or abstract words and a dizzying array of styles. The influence of drugs can't be ignored when appreciating these new sounds, and what we have is basically a band actually creating the zeitgeist, up in the crow's nest of what was suddenly the great ship Counter Culture, sailing to who knows where. It's their best album.

                The Beatles

                Let It Be - Reissue

                  Following on from the global success of ‘Abbey Road’, Apple Corps and USM are proud to present the next multi-format Beatles album reissue of ‘Let It Be’.

                  January 1969 – The Beatles planned to return to live performance, setting up in Twickenham Film Studios, London, for 21 days of rehearsals. They then decamped to their new studio in their Apple office building in Saville Row and on January 30th performed their last ever live group performance on the rooftop. All of this was filmed for a proposed documentary (eventually released in 1970). During the rehearsal process, they asked Glyn Johns, who had been hired to help with the live sound, to attempt a mix to create an album. This was never released, becoming known as one of the great ‘lost’ albums in rock history and is now included in this Super Deluxe Set. The album was delayed further and in fact became their 12th and final official album release on 8th May 1970 following additional production by American producer Phil Spector.


                  The Beatles

                  Abbey Road - 50th Anniversary Edition

                    London – August 8, 2019 – It was 50 years ago today, on August 8, 1969, that the world’s most famous band stepped out from London’s EMI Recording Studios to stride, single-file, across the black and white stripes of Abbey Road’s nearby zebra crossing. With photographer Iain Macmillan balanced on a stepladder and one policeman stopping the street’s light traffic, The Beatles crossed back and forth three times, led by John Lennon, followed by Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison. Just six photos were taken, with the fifth selected as the cover shot for The Beatles’ penultimate studio album, Abbey Road, named after the tree-lined street in which the studios are located. Released September 26, 1969, Abbey Road was not The Beatles’ final album, as Let It Be followed in 1970, but it was the last one John, Paul, George, and Ringo recorded together as a band. The Beatles will celebrate Abbey Road’s anniversary with a suite of beautifully presented packages to be released worldwide on September 27 by Apple Corps Ltd./Capitol/UMe.

                    This is the first time Abbey Road has been remixed and presented with additional session recordings and demos. The album’s sweeping new edition follows the universally acclaimed remixed and expanded anniversary editions of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and The BEATLES (‘White Album’) released in 2017 and 2018, respectively. To create Abbey Road’s new stereo, 5.1 surround, and Dolby Atmos mixes, Martin and Okell worked with an expert team of engineers and audio restoration specialists at Abbey Road Studios. All the new Abbey Road releases feature the new stereo album mix, sourced directly from the original eight-track session tapes. To produce the mix, Giles was guided by the album’s original stereo mix supervised by his father, George Martin.

                    “The magic comes from the hands playing the instruments, the blend of The Beatles’ voices, the beauty of the arrangements,” Giles Martin explains in his written introduction for the new edition. “Our quest is simply to ensure everything sounds as fresh and hits you as hard as it would have on the day it was recorded.”


                    STAFF COMMENTS

                    Andy says: Their final album, and it's a beauty! This is a gorgeous, opulent, warm rock record that set the tone for FM seventies music. And for its 50th Anniversary, ‘Abbey Road’ gets remixed and presented with additional session recordings and demos across six different formats.

                    TRACK LISTING

                    DELUXE 2CD

                    CD ONE: 2019 Stereo Mix
                    1. Come Together
                    2. Something
                    3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
                    4. Oh! Darling
                    5. Octopus’s Garden
                    6. I Want You (She’s So Heavy)
                    7. Here Comes The Sun
                    8. Because
                    9. You Never Give Me Your Money
                    10. Sun King
                    11. Mean Mr Mustard
                    12. Polythene Pam
                    13. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window
                    14. Golden Slumbers
                    15. Carry That Weight
                    16. The End
                    17. Her Majesty

                    CD TWO: Sessions
                    1. Come Together (Take 5)
                    2. Something (Studio Demo)
                    3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12)
                    4. Oh! Darling (Take 4)
                    5. Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)
                    6. I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session & Reduction Mix)
                    7. Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)
                    8. Because (Take 1 Instrumental)
                    9. You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)
                    10. Sun King (Take 20)
                    11. Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)
                    12. Polythene Pam (Take 27)
                    13. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window (Take 27)
                    14. Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3 / Medley)
                    15. The End (Take 3)
                    16. Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)

                    STANDARD [1CD; Digital; 1LP Vinyl
                    2019 Stereo Mix
                    1. Come Together
                    2. Something
                    3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
                    4. Oh! Darling
                    5. Octopus’s Garden
                    6. I Want You (She’s So Heavy)
                    7. Here Comes The Sun
                    8. Because
                    9. You Never Give Me Your Money
                    10. Sun King
                    11. Mean Mr Mustard
                    12. Polythene Pam
                    13. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window
                    14. Golden Slumbers
                    15. Carry That Weight
                    16. The End
                    17. Her Majesty

                    The Beatles

                    Abbey Road - 50th Anniversary Box Set Editions

                      London – August 8, 2019 – It was 50 years ago today, on August 8, 1969, that the world’s most famous band stepped out from London’s EMI Recording Studios to stride, single-file, across the black and white stripes of Abbey Road’s nearby zebra crossing. With photographer Iain Macmillan balanced on a stepladder and one policeman stopping the street’s light traffic, The Beatles crossed back and forth three times, led by John Lennon, followed by Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison. Just six photos were taken, with the fifth selected as the cover shot for The Beatles’ penultimate studio album, Abbey Road, named after the tree-lined street in which the studios are located. Released September 26, 1969, Abbey Road was not The Beatles’ final album, as Let It Be followed in 1970, but it was the last one John, Paul, George, and Ringo recorded together as a band. The Beatles will celebrate Abbey Road’s anniversary with a suite of beautifully presented packages to be released worldwide on September 27 by Apple Corps Ltd./Capitol/UMe. Now available for preorder, the album’s 17 tracks are newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and mix engineer Sam Okell in stereo, high res stereo, 5.1 surround, and Dolby Atmos, accompanied by 23 session recordings and demos, most of which are previously unreleased.

                      “The Beatles recording journey had gone through many twists and turns, learning curves and thrilling rides. Here we were – still wondering at the magic of it all,” McCartney recalls in his written foreword for Abbey Road’s anniversary edition packages.

                      This is the first time Abbey Road has been remixed and presented with additional session recordings and demos. The album’s sweeping new edition follows the universally acclaimed remixed and expanded anniversary editions of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and The BEATLES (‘White Album’) released in 2017 and 2018, respectively. To create Abbey Road’s new stereo, 5.1 surround, and Dolby Atmos mixes, Martin and Okell worked with an expert team of engineers and audio restoration specialists at Abbey Road Studios. All the new Abbey Road releases feature the new stereo album mix, sourced directly from the original eight-track session tapes. To produce the mix, Giles was guided by the album’s original stereo mix supervised by his father, George Martin.

                      “The magic comes from the hands playing the instruments, the blend of The Beatles’ voices, the beauty of the arrangements,” Giles Martin explains in his written introduction for the new edition. “Our quest is simply to ensure everything sounds as fresh and hits you as hard as it would have on the day it was recorded.”

                      Abbey Road’s Super Deluxe box set presents 40 tracks – including “The Long One” Trial Edit & Mix for the album’s epic Side 2 medley – on three CDs (stereo) and one Blu-ray disc (Dolby Atmos, 96kHz/24 bit high resolution stereo, and 96 kHz/24 bit DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1). The four discs are housed in a slip-sleeved 12” by 12” 100-page hardbound book with McCartney’s foreword; Martin’s introduction; insightful, in-depth chapters written by Beatles historian, author, and radio producer Kevin Howlett covering the months preceding The Beatles’ Abbey Road sessions, track-by-track details and session notes, the cover art and photo shoot, and the album’s reception upon its release; plus an essay by music journalist and author David Hepworth looking at the album’s influence through 50 years. The gorgeous book is illustrated with rare and previously unpublished photographs, including many taken by Linda McCartney; never before published images of handwritten lyrics, sketches, and a George Martin score; Beatles correspondence, recording sheets, and tape boxes; and reproduced original print ads. The Super Deluxe digital audio collection presents all 40 tracks for download purchase and streaming in standard and MFiT formats, as well as in high resolution audio (96kHz/24 bit) for download.

                      Abbey Road’s limited edition Deluxe vinyl box set features all 40 tracks from the Super Deluxe collection on three 180-gram vinyl LPs. The album’s new stereo mix LP is packaged in a faithfully replicated sleeve, with the two Sessions LPs paired in their own jacket, presented with a four-page insert in a lift-top box. 

                      Abbey Road’s Super Deluxe and Deluxe vinyl box sets’ 23 session and demo recordings are presented in chronological order of their first recording dates. “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” leads the charge:

                      For an overnight session on February 22, 1969, The Beatles were joined at London’s Trident Studios by producer George Martin and engineer Glyn Johns to record “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” Abbey Road’s new edition combines a take from that session with the concluding part of the Trident master’s eight-track reduction mix made later at the EMI studios, revealing for the first time Billy Preston’s thrilling overdubbed organ solo. With their amps turned up high, The Beatles received a noise complaint from one of the studio’s neighbors in the Soho area of the city. The take starts with Lennon exclaiming, “My boys are ready to go!,” before the band is told about the complaint. Lennon replies, “What are they doing here at this time of night?,” then lays it down: “Well, we’ll try it once more very loud. And then if we don’t get it, we’ll try it quiet, like it might do it the other way. OK. The loud one, last go. Last chance to be loud!”

                      In the same month that the raucous Trident session took place, McCartney recorded a home demo of “Goodbye” for the Apple-signed singer Mary Hopkin and Harrison recorded a solo demo of “Something” at EMI Recording Studios. Both demos are featured on Abbey Road’s new edition. “Goodbye” makes its release debut. Although previously released on Anthology 3 in a version featuring guitar and vocal, the new anniversary mix of George’s “Something” demo features for the first time vocal, guitar and piano.

                      The Beatles reconvened at EMI’s studios and Olympic Sound Studios for sessions spanning mid-April to early May. On April 14, Lennon and McCartney recorded the single “The Ballad Of John And Yoko” in EMI’s Studio Three, with Geoff Emerick as the balance engineer. Two days later, the single’s B-side, “Old Brown Shoe” was recorded. Session recordings for these tracks, as well as three more songs started during this period, “Oh! Darling,” “Octopus’s Garden,” and “You Never Give Me Your Money,” are featured in Abbey Road’s anniversary edition.

                      The remainder of Abbey Road’s sessions took place in July and in August with George Martin producing, and with principal engineers Geoff Emerick and Phil McDonald taking turns at EMI’s groundbreaking new mixing console, the TG12345. On July 2, 3, and 4, McCartney, Harrison, and Starr recorded “Golden Slumbers”/“Carry That Weight” as a medley (Lennon was hospitalized in Scotland, recuperating after a car accident). A sequence of Takes 1-3 from the first day’s session is featured in the anniversary edition. Take 9 from McCartney, Harrison, and Starr’s backing track session for “Here Comes The Sun” on Starr’s July 7 birthday is also included.

                      On July 21, 22, and 23, The Beatles were in-studio to record “Come Together,” followed by additional sessions on July 25, 29, and 30. The anniversary edition features Take 5. On July 23, The Beatles began recording “The End,” which, along with McCartney’s timeless couplet – “And in the end, the love you take / Is equal to the love you make” – features Starr’s only drum solo on a Beatles recording. Take 3 is included in Abbey Road’s new edition. The next day, just before the band’s 34-take session for “Sun King” and “Mean Mr Mustard,” McCartney cut a quick studio demo for “Come And Get It” – later a hit for the Apple-signed band Badfinger. The demo’s original 1969 stereo mix, made with McCartney and Lennon present in the control room, is released for the first time in the new edition, as is Take 20 from The Beatles’ “Sun King” and “Mean Mr Mustard” session. On July 25, two more songs, “Polythene Pam” and “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window,” were recorded as one for inclusion in the album’s epic medley. Take 27 from that session is featured on the new edition.

                      After Harrison had transported his rare and cumbersome Moog synthesizer to the studios, four songs received Beatle-played synthesizer parts: “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” (Lennon), “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer” (McCartney), and “Here Comes The Sun” and “Because” (Harrison). This was a very early use of the newly-invented instrument on a pop record. George Martin wrote arrangements for several tracks that were recorded in Studio One toward the end of the sessions in August 1969. The original overdubbed recordings of Martin’s scores for “Something” and “Golden Slumbers”/“Carry That Weight” are included in Abbey Road’s anniversary edition.

                      August 20, 1969 was the last time The Beatles were together as a band at the EMI studios, for an evening session to compile Abbey Road’s master tapes. The album’s sides were sequenced, with “Come Together” opening Side 1, and with the medley of “You Never Give Me Your Money,” “Sun King,” “Mean Mr Mustard,” “Polythene Pam,” “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window,” “Golden Slumbers,” “Carry That Weight,” and “The End” placed on Side 2. “The Long One,” a different trial edit and mix of the medley, including “Her Majesty” (ultimately placed 14 seconds after “The End” as an unlisted, hidden track) is included in Abbey Road’s new edition.

                      A few weeks before Abbey Road’s release on September 26, 1969, Apple’s press officer Derek Taylor revealed that the album was “recorded at nice, workmanlike sessions which usually began at 2pm and continued until the end of the evening.” Millions of Abbey Road LPs were pressed at manufacturing plants around the world. The album was another blockbuster release for The Beatles, holding the No. 1 spot on the U.K. albums chart for a total of 17 weeks and topping Billboard’s U.S. albums chart for 11 weeks. For their work on Abbey Road, Geoff Emerick and Phil McDonald won the year’s GRAMMY Award® for Best Engineered Recording, Non-Classical. In 1995, Abbey Road was inducted into the Recording Academy’s GRAMMY Hall of Fame, recognizing “recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance.” The Beatles’ best-selling studio album, Abbey Road’s universal popularity and influence have continued to grow since its debut.

                      Since Abbey Road’s release, the street’s zebra crossing has been one of the most celebrated and photographed sites in the world, protected as an historic landmark and visited by thousands of Beatles fans each year. Due to the success of The Beatles’ album, EMI Recording Studios was renamed Abbey Road Studios. Owned and operated by Universal Music Group, Abbey Road Studios is the most famous recording studio in the world and a global music icon.


                      TRACK LISTING

                      SUPER DELUXE [3CD+1Blu-ray Set; Digital Audio Collection]

                      CD ONE: 2019 Stereo Mix
                      1. Come Together
                      2. Something
                      3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
                      4. Oh! Darling
                      5. Octopus’s Garden
                      6. I Want You (She’s So Heavy)
                      7. Here Comes The Sun
                      8. Because
                      9. You Never Give Me Your Money
                      10. Sun King
                      11. Mean Mr Mustard
                      12. Polythene Pam
                      13. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window
                      14. Golden Slumbers
                      15. Carry That Weight
                      16. The End
                      17. Her Majesty

                      CD TWO: Sessions
                      1. I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session & Reduction Mix)
                      2. Goodbye (Home Demo)
                      3. Something (Studio Demo)
                      4. The Ballad Of John And Yoko (Take 7)
                      5. Old Brown Shoe (Take 2)
                      6. Oh! Darling (Take 4)
                      7. Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)
                      8. You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)
                      9. Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)
                      10. Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3 / Medley)
                      11. Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)
                      12. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12)

                      CD THREE: Sessions
                      1. Come Together (Take 5)
                      2. The End (Take 3)
                      3. Come And Get It (Studio Demo)
                      4. Sun King (Take 20)
                      5. Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)
                      6. Polythene Pam (Take 27)
                      7. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window (Take 27)
                      8. Because (Take 1 – Instrumental)
                      9. The Long One (Trial Edit & Mix – 30 July 1969)
                      (Medley: You Never Give Me Your Money, Sun King, Mean Mr Mustard, Her Majesty, Polythene Pam, She Came In Through The Bathroom Window, Golden Slumbers, Carry That Weight, The End)
                      10. Something (Take 39 – Instrumental – Strings Only)
                      11. Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Take 17 – Instrumental – Strings & Brass Only)

                      BLU-RAY: Abbey Road
                      Audio Features:
                      - Dolby Atmos
                      - 96kHz/24 Bit DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
                      - 96kHz/24 Bit High Res Stereo (2019 Stereo Mix)

                      DELUXE 3LP VINYL BOX SET (limited Edition)

                      LP ONE: Side 1 (2019 Stereo Mix)
                      1. Come Together
                      2. Something
                      3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
                      4. Oh! Darling
                      5. Octopus’s Garden
                      6. I Want You (She’s So Heavy)

                      LP ONE: Side 2 (2019 Stereo Mix)
                      1. Here Comes The Sun
                      2. Because
                      3. You Never Give Me Your Money
                      4. Sun King
                      5. Mean Mr Mustard
                      6. Polythene Pam
                      7. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window
                      8. Golden Slumbers
                      9. Carry That Weight
                      10. The End
                      11. Her Majesty

                      LP TWO: Side 1 (Sessions)
                      1. I Want You (She’s So Heavy) (Trident Recording Session And Reduction Mix)
                      2. Goodbye (Home Demo)
                      3. Something (Studio Demo)
                      4. The Ballad Of John And Yoko (Take 7)
                      5. Old Brown Shoe (Take 2)

                      LP TWO: Side 2 (Sessions)
                      1. Oh! Darling (Take 4)
                      2. Octopus’s Garden (Take 9)
                      3. You Never Give Me Your Money (Take 36)
                      4. Her Majesty (Takes 1–3)
                      5. Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Takes 1–3) / Medley)
                      6. Here Comes The Sun (Take 9)
                      7. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer (Take 12)

                      LP THREE: Side 1 (Sessions)
                      1. Come Together (Take 5)
                      2. The End (Take 3)
                      3. Come And Get It (Studio Demo)
                      4. Sun King (Take 20)
                      5. Mean Mr Mustard (Take 20)
                      6. Polythene Pam (Take 27)
                      7. She Came In Through The Bathroom Window (Take 27)
                      8. Because (Take 1 Instrumental)

                      LP THREE: Side 2 (Sessions)
                      1. The Long One (Trial Edit & Mix – 30 July 1969)
                      2. Something (Take 39 – Instrumental – Strings Only)
                      3. Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight (Take 17 – Instrumental – Strings & Brass Only)

                      The Beatles

                      White Album (Stereo 50th Anniversary Reissue)

                      In November 1968, millions of double LPs were shipped to record stores worldwide ahead of that tumultuous year’s most anticipated music event: the November 22nd release of The BEATLES (soon to be better known as ‘The White Album’). With their ninth studio album, The Beatles took the world on a whole new trip, side one blasting off with the exhilarating rush of a screaming jet escorting Paul McCartney’s punchy, exuberant vocals on “Back In The U.S.S.R.” “Dear Prudence” came next, John Lennon warmly beckoning his friend and all of us to “look around.” George Harrison imparted timeless wisdom in “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” singing, “With every mistake we must surely be learning.” Ringo Starr’s “Don’t Pass Me By” marked his first solo songwriting credit on a Beatles album. For 50 years, ‘The White Album’ has invited its listeners to venture forth and explore the breadth and ambition of its music, delighting and inspiring each new generation in turn.

                      For it’s 50th anniversary, The Beatles release a suite of lavishly presented ‘White Album’ packages. The album’s 30 tracks are newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and mix engineer Sam Okell in stereo and 5.1 surround audio, joined by 27 early acoustic demos and 50 session takes, most of which are previously unreleased in any form.

                      “We had left Sgt. Pepper’s band to play in his sunny Elysian Fields and were now striding out in new directions without a map,” says Paul McCartney in his written introduction for the new ‘White Album’ releases.

                      This is the first time The BEATLES (‘White Album’) has been remixed and presented with additional demos and session recordings. The album’s sweeping new edition follows 2017’s universally acclaimed Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Anniversary Edition releases. To create the new stereo and 5.1 surround audio mixes for ‘The White Album,’ Martin and Okell worked with an expert team of engineers and audio restoration specialists at Abbey Road Studios in London. All the new ‘White Album’ releases include Martin’s new stereo album mix, sourced directly from the original four-track and eight-track session tapes. Martin’s new mix is guided by the album’s original stereo mix produced by his father, George Martin.

                      “In remixing ‘The White Album,’ we’ve tried to bring you as close as possible to The Beatles in the studio,” explains Giles Martin in his written introduction for the new edition. “We’ve peeled back the layers of the ‘Glass Onion’ with the hope of immersing old and new listeners into one of the most diverse and inspiring albums ever made.”

                      The minimalist artwork for ‘The White Album’ was created by artist Richard Hamilton, one of Britain’s leading figures in the creation and rise of pop art. The top-loading gatefold sleeve’s stark white exterior had ‘The BEATLES’ embossed on the front and printed on the spine with the album’s catalogue number. Early copies of ‘The White Album’ were also individually numbered on the front, which has also been done for the new edition’s Super Deluxe package. The set’s six CDs and Blu-ray disc are housed in a slipsleeved 164-page hardbound book, with pull-out reproductions of the original album’s four glossy color portrait photographs of John, Paul, George, and Ringo, as well as the album’s large fold-out poster with a photo collage on one side and lyrics on the other. The beautiful book is illustrated with rare photographs, reproductions of handwritten and notated lyrics, previously unpublished photos of recording sheets and tape boxes, and reproduced original ‘White Album’ print ads. The book’s comprehensive written pieces include new introductions by Paul McCartney and Giles Martin, and in-depth chapters covering track-by-track details and session notes reflecting The Beatles’ year between the release of ‘Sgt. Pepper’ and recording sessions for ‘The White Album,’ the band’s July 28 1968 “Mad Day Out” photo shoot in locations around London, the album artwork, the lead-up and execution of the album’s blockbuster release, and its far-ranging influence, written by Beatles historian, author and radio producer Kevin Howlett; journalist and author John Harris; and Tate Britain’s Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Andrew Wilson.

                      The Deluxe 3CD is presented in an embossed digipak with the fold-out poster and portrait photos, plus a 24-page booklet abridged from the Super Deluxe book. Presented in a lift-top box with a four-page booklet, the limited edition Deluxe 4LP vinyl set presents the 2LP album in a faithful, embossed reproduction of its original gatefold sleeve with the fold-out poster and portrait photos, paired with the 2LP Esher Demos in an embossed gatefold sleeve.

                      Much of the initial songwriting for ‘The White Album’ was done in Rishikesh, India between February and April 1968, when John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr joined a course at the Maharishi’s Academy of Transcendental Meditation. In a postcard to Ringo, who had returned to England before the others, John wrote, “we’ve got about two L.P.s worth of songs now so get your drums out.”

                      During the last week of May, The Beatles gathered at George’s house in Esher, Surrey, where they recorded acoustic demos for 27 songs. Known as the Esher Demos, all 27 recordings are included in the new edition’s Deluxe and Super Deluxe packages, sourced from the original four-track tapes. Twenty-one of the demoed songs were recorded during the subsequent studio sessions, and 19 were ultimately finished and included on ‘The White Album.’

                      The Beatles’ studio sessions for The BEATLES (‘White Album’) began on May 30, 1968 at Abbey Road Studios. In the 20 weeks that followed, The Beatles devoted most of their time to sessions there for the new album, with some recording also done at Trident Studios. The final session for the album took place at Abbey Road on October 16, a 24-hour marathon with producer George Martin to sequence the double album’s four sides and to complete edits and cross-fades between its songs. The Beatles’ approach to recording for ‘The White Album’ was quite different from what they had done for ‘Sgt. Pepper.’ Rather than layering individually overdubbed parts on a multi-track tape, many of the ‘White Album’ session takes were recorded to four-track and eight-track tape as group performances with a live lead vocal. The Beatles often recorded take after take for a song, as evidenced by the Super Deluxe set’s Take 102 for “Not Guilty,” a song that was not included on the album. This live-take recording style resulted in a less intricately structured, more unbridled album that would shift the course of rock music and cut a path for punk and indie rock.

                      The Beatles’ newly adopted method of recording all through the night was time consuming and exhausting for their producer, George Martin. Martin had other duties, including his management of AIR (Associated Independent Recording), and he had also composed the orchestral score for The Beatles’ animated feature film, Yellow Submarine, released in July 1968. After the first three months of ‘White Album’ sessions, Martin took a three-week holiday from the studio, entrusting the control room to his young assistant Chris Thomas and balance engineer Ken Scott. Scott had taken the place of engineer Geoff Emerick, who left the sessions in mid-July. On August 22, Ringo Starr also left the sessions, returning 11 days later to find his drum kit adorned with flowers from his bandmates. While the sessions’ four and a half months of long hours and many takes did spark occasional friction in the studio, the session recordings reveal the closeness, camaraderie, and collaborative strengths within the band, as well as with George Martin.

                      The BEATLES (‘White Album’) was the first Beatles album to be released on the group’s own Apple Records label. Issued in both stereo and mono for the U.K. and in stereo for the U.S., the double album was an immediate bestseller, entering the British chart at number one and remaining there for eight of the 22 weeks it was listed. ‘The White Album’ also debuted at number one on the U.S. chart, holding the top spot for nine weeks of its initial 65-week chart run. In his glowing ‘White Album’ review for Rolling Stone, the magazine’s co-founder Jann Wenner declared: “It is the best album they have ever released, and only The Beatles are capable of making a better one.” In the U.S., ‘The White Album’ is 19-times platinum-certified by the RIAA and in 2000, it was inducted into the Recording Academy’s GRAMMY® Hall of Fame, recognizing “recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance.”


                      TRACK LISTING

                      Super Deluxe [6CD+1Blu-ray Set / Digital Audio Collection]
                      CD 1: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix
                      Back In The U.S.S.R.
                      Dear Prudence
                      Glass Onion
                      Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
                      Wild Honey Pie
                      The Continuing Story Of Bungalow Bill
                      While My Guitar Gently Weeps
                      Happiness Is A Warm Gun
                      Martha My Dear
                      I’m So Tired
                      Blackbird
                      Piggies
                      Rocky Raccoon
                      Don’t Pass Me By
                      Why Don’t We Do It In The Road?
                      I Will
                      Julia

                      CD 2: The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix
                      Birthday
                      Yer Blues
                      Mother Nature’s Son
                      Everybody’s Got Something To Hide
                      Except Me And My Monkey
                      Sexy Sadie
                      Helter Skelter
                      Long, Long, Long
                      Revolution I
                      Honey Pie
                      Savoy Truffle
                      Cry Baby Cry
                      Revolution 9
                      Good Night

                      CD 3: Esher Demos
                      Back In The U.S.S.R.
                      Dear Prudence
                      Glass Onion
                      Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
                      The Continuing Story Of Bungalow Bill
                      While My Guitar Gently Weeps
                      Happiness Is A Warm Gun
                      I’m So Tired
                      Blackbird
                      Piggies
                      Rocky Raccoon
                      Julia
                      Yer Blues
                      Mother Nature’s Son
                      Everybody’s Got Something To Hide
                      Except Me And My Monkey
                      Sexy Sadie
                      Revolution
                      Honey Pie
                      Cry Baby Cry
                      Sour Milk Sea
                      Junk
                      Child Of Nature
                      Circles
                      Mean Mr. Mustard
                      Polythene Pam
                      Not Guilty
                      What’s The New Mary Jane

                      CD 4: Sessions
                      Revolution I (Take 18)
                      A Beginning (Take 4) / Don’t Pass Me By (Take 7)
                      Blackbird (Take 28)
                      Everybody’s Got Something To Hide
                      Except Me And My Monkey (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
                      Good Night (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
                      Good Night (Take 10 With A Guitar Part From Take 5)
                      Good Night (Take 22)
                      Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (Take 3)
                      Revolution (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
                      Revolution (Take 14 – Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Cry Baby Cry (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
                      Helter Skelter (First Version – Take 2)

                      CD 5: Sessions
                      Sexy Sadie (Take 3)
                      While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Acoustic Version – Take 2)
                      Hey Jude (Take 1)
                      St. Louis Blues (Studio Jam)
                      Not Guilty (Take 102)
                      Mother Nature’s Son (Take 15)
                      Yer Blues (Take 5 With Guide Vocal)
                      What’s The New Mary Jane (Take 1)
                      Rocky Raccoon (Take 8)
                      Back In The U.S.S.R. (Take 5 – Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Dear Prudence (Vocal, Guitar & Drums)
                      Let It Be (Unnumbered Rehearsal)
                      While My Guitar Gently Weeps (Third Version – Take 27)
                      (You’re So Square) Baby, I Don’t Care (Studio Jam)
                      Helter Skelter (Second Version – Take 17)
                      Glass Onion (Take 10)

                      CD 6: Sessions
                      I Will (Take 13)
                      Blue Moon (Studio Jam)
                      I Will (Take 29)
                      Step Inside Love (Studio Jam)
                      Los Paranoias (Studio Jam)
                      Can You Take Me Back? (Take 1)
                      Birthday (Take 2 – Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Piggies (Take 12 – Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Happiness Is A Warm Gun (Take 19)
                      Honey Pie (Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Savoy Truffle (Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Martha My Dear (Without Brass And Strings)
                      Long, Long, Long (Take 44)
                      I’m So Tired (Take 7)
                      I’m So Tired (Take 14)
                      The Continuing Story Of Bungalow Bill (Take 2)
                      Why Don’t We Do It In The Road? (Take 5)
                      Julia (Two Rehearsals)
                      The Inner Light (Take 6 – Instrumental Backing Track)
                      Lady Madonna (Take 2 – Piano And Drums)
                      Lady Madonna (Backing Vocals From Take 3)
                      Across The Universe (Take 6)

                      Blu-ray: The BEATLES (‘White Album’)
                      Audio Features:
                      : PCM Stereo (2018 Stereo Mix)
                      : DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (2018)
                      : Dolby True HD 5.1 (2018)
                      : Mono (2018 Direct Transfer Of ‘The White Album’ Original Mono Mix)

                       Deluxe [3CD Digipak / 180-gram 4LP Vinyl Box Set (limited Edition)
                      The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix
                      Esher Demos

                      Standard 2LP Vinyl [180-gram]
                      The BEATLES (‘White Album’) 2018 Stereo Mix

                      The Beatles

                      Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band - 2017 Stereo Mix

                        Produced by Giles Martin for this year’s universally heralded ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition releases, the album’s new stereo mix was sourced directly from the original four-track session tapes and guided by the original, Beatles-preferred mono mix produced by Giles’ father, George Martin. Praised by fans and music critics around the world, The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition is 2017’s most celebrated historical music release and an ideal gift for Beatle People here, there, and everywhere.

                        The Beatles

                        Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band - 50th Anniversary Edition

                          London – April 5, 2017 – It was 50 years ago this June 1st when The Beatles’ John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr astonished and delighted the world, ushering in the Summer of Love with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, a groundbreaking masterwork that became popular music’s most universally acclaimed album. To salute the occasion, The Beatles release a suite of lavishly presented ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition packages. The album is newly mixed by Giles Martin and Sam Okell in stereo and 5.1 surround audio and expanded with early takes from the studio sessions, including no fewer than 34 previously unreleased recordings.

                          “It’s crazy to think that 50 years later we are looking back on this project with such fondness and a little bit of amazement at how four guys, a great producer and his engineers could make such a lasting piece of art,” says Paul McCartney in his newly-penned introduction for the ‘Sgt. Pepper’ Anniversary Edition.

                          “‘Sgt. Pepper’ seemed to capture the mood of that year, and it also allowed a lot of other people to kick off from there and to really go for it,” Ringo Starr recalls in the Anniversary Edition’s book.

                          This is the first time Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band has been remixed and presented with additional session recordings, and it is the first Beatles album to be remixed and expanded since the 2003 release of Let It Be… Naked. To create the new stereo and 5.1 surround audio mixes for ‘Sgt. Pepper,’ producer Giles Martin and mix engineer Sam Okell worked with an expert team of engineers and audio restoration specialists at Abbey Road Studios in London. All of the Anniversary Edition releases include Martin’s new stereo mix of the album, which was sourced directly from the original four-track session tapes and guided by the original, Beatles-preferred mono mix produced by his father, George Martin.


                          TRACK LISTING

                          CD
                          (‘Sgt. Pepper’ 2017 Stereo Mix)
                          1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
                          2. With A Little Help From My Friends
                          3. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds
                          4. Getting Better
                          5. Fixing A Hole
                          6. She's Leaving Home
                          7. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite!
                          8. Within You Without You
                          9. When I'm Sixty-Four
                          10. Lovely Rita
                          11. Good Morning Good Morning
                          12. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)
                          13. A Day In The Life

                          Deluxe [2CD]
                          CD 1: ‘Sgt. Pepper’ 2017 Stereo Mix (same As Single-disc CD Tracklist, Above)

                          CD 2: Complete Early Takes From The Sessions In The Same Sequence As The Album, Plus Various Versions Of “Strawberry Fields Forever” And “Penny Lane”
                          1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band [Take 9]
                          2. With A Little Help From My Friends [Take 1 - False Start And Take 2 – Instrumental]
                          3. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds [Take 1]
                          4. Getting Better [Take 1 - Instrumental And Speech At The End]
                          5. Fixing A Hole [Speech And Take 3]
                          6. She's Leaving Home [Take 1 – Instrumental]
                          7. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite! [Take 4]
                          8. Within You Without You [Take 1 - Indian Instruments]
                          9. When I'm Sixty-Four [Take 2]
                          10. Lovely Rita [Speech And Take 9]
                          11. Good Morning Good Morning [Take 8]
                          12. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise) [Take 8]
                          13. A Day In The Life [Take 1 With Hummed Last Chord]
                          14. Strawberry Fields Forever [Take 7]
                          15. Strawberry Fields Forever [Take 26]
                          16. Strawberry Fields Forever [Stereo Mix - 2015]
                          17. Penny Lane [Take 6 - Instrumental]
                          18. Penny Lane [Stereo Mix - 2017]

                          Deluxe Vinyl [180g 2LP]
                          LP 1: ‘Sgt. Pepper’ 2017 Stereo Mix (same As Single-disc CD Tracklist, Above)
                          SIDE 1 SIDE 2
                          1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 1. Within You Without You
                          2. With A Little Help From My Friends 2. When I'm Sixty-Four
                          3. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds 3. Lovely Rita
                          4. Getting Better 4. Good Morning Good Morning
                          5. Fixing A Hole 5. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
                          6. She's Leaving Home 6. A Day In The Life
                          7. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite!

                          LP 2: Complete Early Takes From The Sessions In The Same Sequence As The Album
                          SIDE 3
                          1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band [Take 9 And Speech]
                          2. With A Little Help From My Friends [Take 1 - False Start And Take 2 – Instrumental]
                          3. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds [Take 1]
                          4. Getting Better [Take 1 - Instrumental And Speech At The End]
                          5. Fixing A Hole [Speech And Take 3]
                          6. She's Leaving Home [Take 1 – Instrumental]
                          7. Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite! [Take 4]

                          SIDE 4
                          1. Within You Without You [Take 1 - Indian Instruments]
                          2. When I'm Sixty-Four [Take 2]
                          3. Lovely Rita [Speech And Take 9]
                          4. Good Morning Good Morning [Take 8]
                          5. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise) [Take 8]
                          6. A Day In The Life [Take 1 With Hummed Last Chord]

                          The Beatles

                          Please Please Me - Vinyl Edition

                            Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                            The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                            Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                            In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                            For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                            There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                            The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                            A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                            The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                            Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                            The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                            An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                            Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                            TRACK LISTING

                            Side 1:
                            1. I Saw Her Standing There (2009 - Remaster)
                            2. Misery (2009 - Remaster)
                            3. Anna (Go To Him) (2009 - Remaster)
                            4. Chains (2009 - Remaster)
                            5. Boys (2009 - Remaster)
                            6. Ask Me Why (2009 - Remaster)
                            7. Please Please Me (2009 - Remaster)

                            Side 2:
                            1. Love Me Do (2009 - Remaster)
                            2. P.S. I Love You (2009 - Remaster)
                            3. Baby It's You (2009 - Remaster)
                            4. Do You Want To Know A Secret (2009 - Remaster)
                            5. A Taste Of Honey (2009 - Remaster)
                            6. There's A Place (2009 - Remaster)
                            7. Twist And Shout (2009 - Remaster)

                            The Beatles

                            Past Masters (Volumes 1 & 2) - Vinyl Edition

                              Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                              The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                              Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                              In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                              For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                              There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                              The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                              A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                              The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                              Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                              The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                              An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                              Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                              TRACK LISTING

                              Side 1:
                              1. Love Me Do (Original Single Version) (2009 - Remaster)
                              2. From Me To You (2009 - Remaster)
                              3. Thank You Girl (2009 - Remaster)
                              4. She Loves You (2009 - Remaster)
                              5. I'll Get You (2009 - Remaster)
                              6. I Want To Hold Your Hand (2009 - Remaster)
                              7. This Boy (2009 - Remaster)
                              8. Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand (2009 - Remaster)
                              9. Sie Liebt Dich (2009 - Remaster)

                              Side 2:

                              1. Long Tall Sally (2009 - Remaster)
                              2. I Call Your Name (2009 - Remaster)
                              3. Slow Down (2009 - Remaster)
                              4. Matchbox (2009 - Remaster)
                              5. I Feel Fine (2009 - Remaster)
                              6. She's A Woman (2009 - Remaster)
                              7. Bad Boy (2009 - Remaster)
                              8. Yes It Is (2009 - Remaster)
                              9. I'm Down (2009 - Remaster)

                              Side 3:
                              1. Day Tripper (2009 - Remaster)
                              2. We Can Work It Out (2009 - Remaster)
                              3. Paperback Writer (2009 - Remaster)
                              4. Rain (2009 - Remaster)
                              5. Lady Madonna (2009 - Remaster)
                              6. The Inner Light (2009 - Remaster)
                              7. Hey Jude (2009 - Remaster)
                              8. Revolution (2009 - Remaster)

                              Side 4:

                              1. Get Back (2009 - Remaster)
                              2. Don't Let Me Down (2009 - Remaster)
                              3. The Ballad Of John And Yoko (2009 - Remaster)
                              4. Old Brown Shoe (2009 - Remaster)
                              5. Across The Universe (2009 - Remaster)
                              6. Let It Be (2009 - Remaster)
                              7. You Know My Name (Look Up The Number) (2009 - Remaster)

                              The Beatles

                              Rubber Soul - Vinyl Edition

                                Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                                The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                                Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                                In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                                For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                                There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                                The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                                A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                                The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                                Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                                The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                                An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                                Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                                TRACK LISTING

                                Side 1:
                                1. Drive My Car (2009 - Remaster)
                                2. Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) (2009 - Remaster)
                                3. You Won't See Me (2009 - Remaster)
                                4. Nowhere Man (2009 - Remaster)
                                5. Think For Yourself (2009 - Remaster)
                                6. The Word (2009 - Remaster)
                                7. Michelle (2009 - Remaster)

                                Side 2:
                                1. What Goes On (2009 - Remaster)
                                2. Girl (2009 - Remaster)
                                3. I'm Looking Through You (2009 - Remaster)
                                4. In My Life (2009 - Remaster)
                                5. Wait (2009 - Remaster)
                                6. If I Needed Someone (2009 - Remaster)
                                7. Run For Your Life (2009 - Remaster)

                                The Beatles

                                Yellow Submarine - Vinyl Edition

                                  Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                                  The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                                  Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                                  In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                                  For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                                  There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                                  The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                                  A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                                  The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                                  Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                                  The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                                  An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                                  Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                                  TRACK LISTING

                                  Side 1:
                                  1. Yellow Submarine (2009 - Remaster)
                                  2. Only A Northern Song (2009 - Remaster)
                                  3. All Together Now (2009 - Remaster)
                                  4. Hey Bulldog (2009 - Remaster)
                                  5. It's All Too Much (2009 - Remaster)
                                  6. All You Need Is Love (2009 - Remaster)

                                  Side 2:
                                  1. Pepperland (2009 - Remaster)
                                  2. Sea Of Time (2009 - Remaster)
                                  3. Sea Of Holes (2009 - Remaster)
                                  4. Sea Of Monsters (2009 - Remaster)
                                  5. March Of The Meanies (2009 - Remaster)
                                  6. Pepperland Laid Waste (2009 - Remaster)
                                  7. Yellow Submarine In Pepperland (2009 - Remaster)

                                  The Beatles

                                  Magical Mystery Tour - Vinyl Edition

                                    Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                                    The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                                    Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                                    In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                                    For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                                    There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                                    The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                                    A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                                    The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                                    Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                                    The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                                    An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                                    Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                                    TRACK LISTING

                                    Side 1:
                                    1. Magical Mystery Tour (2009 - Remaster)
                                    2. The Fool On The Hill (2009 - Remaster)
                                    3. Flying (2009 - Remaster)
                                    4. Blue Jay Way (2009 - Remaster)
                                    5. Your Mother Should Know (2009 - Remaster)
                                    6. I Am The Walrus (2009 - Remaster)

                                    Side 2:
                                    1. Hello, Goodbye (2009 - Remaster)
                                    2. Strawberry Fields Forever (2009 - Remaster)
                                    3. Penny Lane (2009 - Remaster)
                                    4. Baby, You're A Rich Man (2009 - Remaster)
                                    5. All You Need Is Love (2009 - Remaster)

                                    The Beatles

                                    Help! - Vinyl Edition

                                      Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band’s cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles.

                                      The titles include The Beatles’ 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group’s core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities.

                                      Since it was recorded, The Beatles’ music has been heard on a variety of formats – from chunky reel-to-reel tapes and eight-track cartridges to invisible computer files. But there has never been a more romantic or thrilling medium for music than a long-playing twelve-inch disc. We ‘play’ records. The process of carefully slipping the disc out of the sleeve, cleaning it and lowering the stylus provides a personal involvement in the reproduction of the music.

                                      In September, 2009, The Beatles’ remastered albums on CD graced charts around the world. Seventeen million album sales within seven months was resounding evidence of the timeless relevance of their legacy. Through five decades, the music of The Beatles has captivated generation upon generation.

                                      For producer Rick Rubin, surveying The Beatles’ recorded achievements is akin to witnessing a miracle. “If we look at it by today’s standards, whoever the most popular bands in the world are, they will typically put out an album every four years,” Rubin said in a 2009 radio series interview. “So, let’s say two albums as an eight year cycle. And think of the growth or change between those two albums. The idea that The Beatles made thirteen albums in seven years and went through that arc of change... it can’t be done. Truthfully, I think of it as proof of God, because it’s beyond man’s ability.”

                                      There has always been demand for The Beatles’ albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011’s best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles’ acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles’ vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple.

                                      The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl.

                                      A ‘blind’ listening test was arranged to choose between a ‘lacquer’ or ‘copper’ cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day’s Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having ‘blank’ discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers.

                                      The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting’ - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs.

                                      Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes’ - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of ‘inner-groove distortion’ was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.

                                      The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

                                      An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the ‘lock-groove’ at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

                                      Highly-skilled technicians have worked long and hard to make The Beatles on vinyl sound better than ever. All we need to do is listen to the results of their dedicated labour on the remastered LPs. Handle with care. But most of all, enjoy the music.

                                      TRACK LISTING

                                      Side 1:
                                      1. Help! (2009 - Remaster)
                                      2. The Night Before (2009 - Remaster)
                                      3. You've Got To Hide Your Love Away (2009 - Remaster)
                                      4. I Need You (2009 - Remaster)
                                      5. Another Girl (2009 - Remaster)
                                      6. You're Going To Lose That Girl (2009 - Remaster)
                                      7. Ticket To Ride (2009 - Remaster)

                                      Side 2:
                                      1. Act Naturally (2009 - Remaster)
                                      2. It's Only Love (2009 - Remaster)
                                      3. You Like Me Too Much (2009 - Remaster)
                                      4. Tell Me What You See (2009 - Remaster)
                                      5. I've Just Seen A Face (2009 - Remaster)
                                      6. Yesterday (2009 - Remaster)
                                      7. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (2009 - Remaster)

                                      The Beatles

                                      Help! - Enhanced Edition

                                        The last of The Beatles be-suited, writing-to-order, perfect pop albums, this was a brilliant collection of songs from the film Help!, and other newies, that includes the superb "Ticket To Ride", "Yesterday" and of course, the title track itself. Albums in this era, up until about 1965, were simply collections of songs that could have been singles; there was no real concept of 'the album as a statement', as a piece of art in its own right. This was just pop music: short, simple, catchy, and in the case of The Beatles, brilliant!

                                        Tracklisting
                                        1. Help!
                                        2. The Night Before
                                        3. You've Got To Hide Your Love Away
                                        4. I Need You
                                        5. Another Girl
                                        6. You're Going To Lose That Girl
                                        7. Ticket To Ride
                                        8. Act Naturally
                                        9. It's Only Love
                                        10. You Like Me Too Much
                                        11. Tell Me What You See
                                        12. I've Just Seen A Face
                                        13. Yesterday
                                        14. Dizzy Miss Lizzy
                                        15. Help! Documentary

                                        The Beatles

                                        A Hard Days Night - Enhanced Edition

                                          The biggest band in rock history sees their original catalogue digitally remastered for the first time with improved packaging, including extra rare photographs, expanded and new essays and all enhanced with a video mini-documentary on the making of each album in the Beatles own words.


                                          1. A Hard Day's Night
                                          2. I Should Have Known Better
                                          3. If I Fell
                                          4. I'm Happy Just To Dance With You
                                          5. And I Love Her
                                          6. Tell Me Why
                                          7. Can't Buy Me Love
                                          8. Any Time At All
                                          9. I'll Cry Instead
                                          10. Things We Said Today
                                          11. When I Get Home
                                          12. You Can't Do That
                                          13. I'll Be Back
                                          14. A Hard Day's Night Documentary

                                          TRACK LISTING

                                          1. A Hard Day's Night
                                          2. I Should Have Known Better
                                          3. If I Fell
                                          4. I'm Happy Just To Dance With You
                                          5. And I Love Her
                                          6. Tell Me Why
                                          7. Can't Buy Me Love
                                          8. Any Time At All
                                          9. I'll Cry Instead
                                          10. Things We Said Today
                                          11. When I Get Home
                                          12. You Can't Do That
                                          13. I'll Be Back
                                          14. A Hard Day's Night Documentary

                                          Various Artists

                                          Glass Onion - Songs Of The Beatles

                                            A selection of Beatles covers from the Atlantic and Warner vaults. Includes Aretha Franklin, Ella Fitzgerald, Arif Mardin, The Harvey Averne Dozen, The Meters, Charles Wright, Herbie Mann etc.

                                            Various Artists

                                            Here, There And Everywhere - The Songs Of The Beatles A Windham Hill Collection

                                              Unintentionally funny and totally pretentious versions of classic Beatles songs performed by musicians on the Windham Hill label who should be told that just playing things slowly doesn't impart 'feeling' or 'meaning' to a song. These guys kill most of the melody lines of these great songs stone dead. A notable exception is George Winston's "Martha My Dear" which is humourous but joyful.


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