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Although James Chance’s Contortions had already appeared on Brian Eno’s legendary "No New York" compilation in 1978, "Buy" was the group’s first full-length LP. An angular and brilliant mix of free jazz and post-punk funk, this seminal 1979 album is the quintessential No Wave release and the spark for much of what has come out of the Downtown New York music scene over the past thirty years.

Harumi

Harumi

    Originally released in 1968, Harumi is a classic double album of obscure Japan meets Greenwich Village psych with legendary producer Tom Wilson (Velvet Underground, Zappa, Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel) at the helm, desperately trying to reign in the talents of this enigmatic Japanese artist on the outer fringes of an East/West freak out. All songs are sung in English. 'Harumi' is a remarkable album with tracks ranging from catchy pop to more experimental moments. Including contributions from his parents, this is a truly unique and seriously psychedelic work. A great reissue!

    Centipede

    Septober Energy

      An ambitious, four-movement suite, led by Keith Tippett, and produced by Robert Fripp in 1971. This 50-piece orchestra brought together the best British musicians of the day, including members of Soft Machine, King Crimson and Nucleus, as well as jazz musicians Gary Windo, Mark Charig, Elton Dean, Karl Jenkins, Nick Evans, and Ian Carr. Despite having been released over 30 years ago, Septober Energy remains a force to be reckoned with, and while the 85-minutes of music often resembles that of KC or SM, it also brings in elements of free jazz and contemporary classical music. Finally reissued on double gatefold vinyl and featuring the original artwork!

      Flower Travellin' Band

      Anywhere

        A true cult band of the early 1970s, the Flower Travellin’ Band (initially called the Flowers) was started in 1969 by Yuya Uchida, who went on to become a major figure on the Japanese music scene. In the months leading up to his starting the band, Uchida had spent time in London visiting a good friend named John Lennon (who he had met during the Beatles Asian tour in 1966). During his stay in London he met a huge array of artists, including Cream and Jimi Hendrix, and returned home with the idea of bringing a similar sound to Japan.

        The band soon caused a stir in the media, not so much for their music (which at this early stage was made up mostly of covers), but for their shocking sleeve art, which in the case of this LP featured the naked band members riding low-rider motorcycles! Anywhere opens with a 52 second original intro followed by a freaked-out 15 min version of Muddy Water’s “Louisiana Blues”, followed by the Sabs “Black Sabbath” (probably the first cover of that song ever to appear on LP), “House of the Rising Sun” and King Crimson’s “21st Century Schizoid Man”, and then an original outro. It was not until their next album however, that Uchida would truly come into his own, penning his first LP of all original material (1971’s Satori) and a true classic of the era.

        FORMAT INFORMATION

        LP Info: LP with inside pocket / Japanese liner notes.


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