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CRASS

Crass

Normal Never Was III

    'As part of their ambitious ‘The Feeding of the Five Thousand Remix Project’, punk pioneers Crass are returning with another exclusive coloured 12” single featuring remixes by legendary producer Steve Aoki and Japanese outsider musician Mikado Koko. In this latest release, the third in the series, ‘Banned From The Roxy’ is given a dirty, bass-heavy and anthemic turnaround by two-time Grammy nominated Aoki with ‘Roxy (Unf*ck the World Steve Aoki Remix)’, one that pushes the crucial original lyrics to the front but gleefully plays with the fast paced, maniacal beat. ‘Asylum (Mikado Koko Remix)’ preserves the antireligious spoken word piece with a subtle but no less impactful twist. Both serve to inject even more intensity to already powerful tracks and are crystal clear reminders of why Crass were so important and remain so vital today. All monies raised from the project will go to the charity ‘Refuge’ 

    FORMAT INFORMATION

    Ltd 12" Info: Coloured 12"

    Crass

    Normal Never Was II

      Following XL Recordings honcho Richard Russell’s remix of ‘Bomb’ a few weeks back, the Crass ‘Feeding Of The Five Thousand’ remix project enters its next stage with a high-energy dancefloor deconstruction of ‘G’s Song’ by New York DJ, producer and promoter Johnny Dynell. Well known for his 1983 cult hit ‘Jam Hot’ (remixed and sampled many times over, most famously by Fatboy Slim and his group Beats International for ‘Dub Be Good To Me’ in 1990), Dynell has had a long and illustrious career in music with his roots in the 70s Downtown No Wave art-punk scene. Dynell’s connection and friendship with Crass goes back to those days when the anarchist punk icons played their only US gigs in 1978 in New York.

      ‘The 12” also includes a jarring, cut-up experimental remix of the band’s infamous ‘Banned From The Roxy’ worked on by electronic composer and video artist Charles Webber who, apart from his own extensive compositions, has for many years collaborated closely with Crass vocalist Eve Libertine on such works as the chamber opera ‘Room of Worlds’, an arrangement of Wilhelm Reich’s ‘Listen Little Man’ and the ‘Kernschmelze’ series devised by Crass founder Penny Rimbaud.

      Late last year Crass took the step of making the original separate track stems of their seminal debut album ‘The Feeding of the Five Thousand’ available as a free download. With a call to take the original sixteen track recording in its pre-mix state, the intent was for people to create their own remixes and interpretations and breathe fresh life and ideas into this revolutionary music.

      First released in 1978, ‘The Feeding of the Five Thousand’ pre-empted rap and grime in its hard-on-the-beat, fast fire, uncompromising lyrics and the iconic sounds and messages are ripe for reinterpretation. Crass encouraged people to rip apart the sound and ideas and create something new, then send the files to Crass Records for future releases and charitable projects. The message is DIY like it never was before. “Yours for the taking, yours for the making,” Crass said. “You do it, we’ll stew it. Mix it backwards, forwards and upside down. Turn up the heat and fix it with a downbeat, bring in the trumpets and let ‘em blow, let the piper call the tune to let us all know. It’s up to you to do what you like with it. The only limitation is your imagination.”

      All monies raised from the project will go to the charity ‘Refuge’ - http://www.refuge.org.uk who state:
      ‘Refuge is incredibly grateful to Crass and their team for helping raise vital funds for Refuge. Since the start of lockdown, Refuge has seen a 66% rise in demand for its Helpline, and a 950% rise in visits to its Helpline website. This shows the sheer extent of the need for specialist domestic abuse services – not just during lockdown but beyond. Every penny raised helps us to ensure that no woman or child is turned away from safety.
      ‘While lockdown itself doesn’t cause domestic abuse - abuse happens all year round - it does, of course, have the potential to aggravate pre-existing abusive behaviours – and the data we have shows us the increase in the need for our services during lockdown. Refuge worked incredibly hard at the beginning of the pandemic to make sure our services remained open and remained safe. The generous donations we have received, including those from Crass, mean we can continue to provide the life-saving and life-changing services that women experiencing domestic abuse need and deserve.’


      FORMAT INFORMATION

      Ltd 12" Info: Blue vinyl limited to 500 copies.

      Crass

      Normal Never Was

        Late last year, anarchist punk icons Crass took the step of making the original separate track stems of their seminal debut album ‘The Feeding of the Five Thousand’ available as a free download on One Little Indian Records. With a call to take the original sixteen track recording in its pre-mix state, the intent was for people to create their own remixes and interpretations and breathe fresh life and ideas into this revolutionary music.

        First released in 1978, ‘The Feeding of the Five Thousand’ pre-empted rap and grime in its hard-on-the-beat, fast fire, uncompromising lyrics and the iconic sounds and messages are ripe for reinterpretation. Crass encouraged people to rip apart the sound and ideas and create something new, then send the files to Crass Records for future releases and charitable projects. The message is DIY like it never was before. “Yours for the taking, yours for the making,” Crass said. “You do it, we’ll stew it. Mix it backwards, forwards and upside down. Turn up the heat and fix it with a downbeat, bring in the trumpets and let ‘em blow, let the piper call the tune to let us all know, it’s up to you to do what you like with it. The only limitation is your imagination.”

        The response was fantastic with close to one hundred submissions from professionals, amateurs, do gooders, do badders, DIYers and give it a tryers twisting and morphing the sounds.

        The first results of this creative process are ready to be heard and released in the form of a twelve-inch EP (alongside a limited 1000 red vinyl pressing) of remixes by producer and XL Recordings honcho Richard Russell under the guise rLr, who tackles and further subverts the anti-war anthem ‘They’ve Got A Bomb’, turning it into a stuttering, rhythmic rattle, whilst Boston, Massachusetts experimental synth-pop artist Glasser takes aim at ‘Do They Owe Us A Living?’ and takes the original songs simple, direct messaging into entirely different realms of rhythm and distortion.

        “Crass is a great example of futuristic art and lifestyle; anchored in communal ethics and collective spirit, moving beyond mere defiance of authority and into radical ideas of love and creativity,” explains Glasser. “I’m so glad I had the chance to play around with their recordings. It’s basically the best gift a fan could get from the artists they admire. “


        FORMAT INFORMATION

        Ltd 12" Info: Limited Edition Red Vinyl.

        Crass

        Yes Sir, I Will

          Album has been remastered by Alex Gordon at Abbey Road Studios, as close as possible to the sound of the original release.

          “As it was in the beginning”. Yes Sir, I Will was the fifth and penultimate album released in March 1983 by the anarcho-punk band, Crass.

          The album was essentially a bitter and virulent attack on then prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, and her government in the aftermath of the Falklands War and was set nearly wholly over a raging and an almost free-form improvised backing provided by the group's musicians. Many of the lyrics from this album are extracted from Penny Rimbaud's extended poem ‘Rocky Eyed’. The original vinyl release contained no banding between songs, thus presenting the contents as one long piece split over both sides, making it the longest punk song ever recorded (the CD release was tracked by individual song). Rimbaud summarised the album in an interview to Radio Free France:

          “The boundaries increasingly ceased to have any relevance - prior to the Falklands War, one naively believed that there were separations between 'this' and 'that' and that if you dealt with 'this' then you could do 'that'... like songs - each song had its own little separate thing to deal with and Yes Sir, I Will is a statement about the fact that there isn't any separation - that it's all one and the same thing, that there is no single cause or single idea - there's no-one else to blame but yourself. That you can't say, "Well let's now concentrate on the Northern Ireland problem", "let's now concentrate on the problem of sexual relationships"... you can't do that - everything now is one major problem and that problem stems from yourself.”

          FORMAT INFORMATION

          CD Info: Fold-out poster sleeve – replicates first original pressing.

          Crass

          Ten Notes On A Summer's Day

            Ten Notes on a Summer's Day was Crass's final album under the Crass name. It was released in 1986 and consists of a vocal and instrumental version of the same tracks in an avant-garde musical style.

            Recorded at Southern Studios in the Winter of 1984 / Summer 1985. Penny Rimbaud says in the liner notes: “Just as throughout our seven years’ existence as a punk band we had made concerted efforts to avoid specific political pigeonholing (‘left-wing, right-wing, you can stuff the lot’), so, musically, we attempted to push the barriers, always avoiding the obvious.”

            In one respect alone we were absolutely consistent; our inconsistency. If the essentially rowdy Feeding of the Five Thousand and Stations Of The Crass had established us as the thinking man’s bovver band, so Penis Envy broke the mould as an almost lyrical, yet still very angry piece of rock’n’roll feminism. And just as at the very time that the BBC thought us safe enough to be given airplay, so we ploughed in with Christ, The Album, an uncompromisingly avantgarde noise album which in its own way went a long way in redefining rock’n’roll’s limited parameters.

            Then, in much the same way as our fifth album, Yes Sir, I Will, owed more to free jazz than to rock, so Ten Notes On A Summer’s Day nudged itself towards modern European atonality, and us completely out of the rock’n’roll arena (as testified to by dramatically reduced record sales). In this sense, Ten Notes On A Summer’s Day truly was a swansong.”

            The vinyl edition comes in a single sleeve with printed inner – bag/insert. The CD comes in cardboard digipack type packaging.

            Crass

            Best Before 1984

              One Little Indian are proud to announce that they will be distributing entire Crass Catalogue on behalf of Crass Records.

              Album remastered by Alex Gordon at Abbey Road Studios, as close as possible to the sound of the original release. “As it was in the beginning”.

              Best Before 1984 is a compilation of Crass' singles and other tracks, released in 1986, including lyrics and a booklet ("...In Which Crass Voluntarily 'Blow Their Own'") which details the history of the band in their own words.


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