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CLUB PARADISE

Club Paradise

Growing Up

    Growing Up is the debut physical release by Newcastle quartet Club Paradise, released on Kids Records (The Wombats, The Whip, Band of Horses, I Like Trains) featuring four epic guitar-pop tracks each, in the words of CMU: "featuring a chorus that will fill every corner of any room you'd care to put it in".

    The band have built a fierce local following and have already shared the stage with the likes of Vistas, Apre, Larkins, Kashmere, Vant, Saint Raymond, The Navettes and Only The Poets, as well as picking up early attention from the likes of Clash Magazine, Shortlist and a legion of blogs. Made up of school friends Ryan Young (vocals/guitar), Jackson Vert (lead guitar), Harry Webb (bass) and Nathan Hogg (drums), the band cite the likes of Foals, The Midnight, Jungle and The Horrors as influences, writing tracks reminiscent of an 80s Sunset Boulevard movie montage.

    FORMAT INFORMATION

    Ltd 12" Info: Limited to 300 copies.

    Paradise bears the touch of a songwriting unit who share and divide. Songs begin and end with Rebecca and Charles swapping verses, even when the song itself is deeply personal to one of them. On Never Look Back, which bubbles into existence with cooing two-part harmony, Charles delivers the startling lines: “Baby brother in the next room, trying to bring him back to life”. It sees the 23 year-old singer recalling a dream in which an imaginary brother lays dying in the next room. On forthcoming single Two Cousins, Rebecca imagines that life is simply a journey which ends in our return to childhood when we die. “Hold on to where you’re from, it’s where you heart goes when you’re done”. Gold Mountain drifts languidly, like the lonely walk home after a drunken night out. It is, in fact, yet another song in which the bittersweet melody belies the arresting theme at the heart of the lyrics- “They have found, when life is pouring out, you are the only one that counts-“ Earth and Ash is about Rebecca’s closeness to her granddad, and her underlying fear about what will happen when he dies. “I've not played him the song, he wouldn't get it,” says Rebecca, “He always says (adopting a gruff Sheffield accent): 'why can't you play one of them Eva Cassidy songs? Or something by Joni Mitchell?'”, so I can't imagine a song about him dying is the introduction to Slow Club he really needs.”



    Slow Club’s currency is songwriting which sees romance in the unlikeliest of corners, and Paradise applies a lighter, more honed lyrical touch to telling their story. More than anything, Paradise is a platform for Slow Club’s mordant Englishness at its best, displaying a restraint and self-deprecating wit even in the darkest of sentiments.




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