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R. Stevie Moore

Afterlife

    This guy again. The Godfather of DIY home recording. Hundreds of self-released albums over the past 50 years. Dozens issued on countless indie labels since 1976. Pop craftsman, crafty grandpop, notorious curmudgeon. Blah blah blah blah blah. Most recently teamed with Jason Falkner on the album Make It Be.

    Since R. Stevie can't make a decent living on his music, he's trying to accomplish the task in the Afterlife. This album is an upgrade from the lo-fi, damaged-equipment home recording process for which RSM has become legendary. With a career-long sweep, R. Stevie took some of his best home-recorded lo-fi songs and re-recorded them with full-studio sparkle. All recordings were made in the past 15 years, with tracks captured in five U.S. states. Some compositions date from the 1970s to the 1990s, and there's a few newer tunes. The album lacks one thing: filler. Lou Reed famously said about his final Velvet Underground album: "I gave them an album loaded with hits," then he walked away. Afterlife is R. Stevie's Loaded—an album full of hits. He's walking away with a cane, a bum knee, and cataracts.

    Afterlife was compiled and produced by Irwin Chusid (who oversees the musical estates of Sun Ra, Raymond Scott, and others). Chusid, a WFMU DJ since 1975, has been a compatriot of RSM since they met in 1978 after R. Stevie relocated to New Jersey from his native Nashville (to which he returned in 2010). It's often been pointed out that RSM's daddy Bob played bass with Elvis. But we won't dwell on that here.


    Alex Chilton

    Memphis To New Orleans

      These recordings from Alex Chilton have been out of print for over a decade. Hugely influence to and lauded by the likes of Wilco, REM, The Replacements among many others....these are the best of his recordings from the 1980's.

      Some know him as the lead singer of the Boxtops who had a number one hit in 1967 with “The Letter,” others know him from the majestic Beatlesque pop of Big Star or as the name in a song by the Replacements (“Children by the millions sing of Alex Chilton…”) Others know him as the songwriter of the theme song for That 70s Show.

      He was at the height of his cult star fame in the mid 1980s when he made these recordings and it is some of his best most honest work oddly neglected for some time but delivered here for enthusiasts and neophites alike. 


      Alex Chilton

      Songs From Robin Hood Lane

        Alex Chilton, front man for the Boxtops and Big Star was always known to surprise his fans with different directions he took over the years. Songs From Robin Hood Lane finds Chilton tackling a variety of numbers from the great American songbook. These songs are the first Alex ever heard as a kid in the 1950s growing up in a Memphis suburban streat called Robin Hood Lane. Recorded in 1990.

        Many of the songs he learned from his father Sidney Chilton, a jazz trumpeter and pianist when Alex was a kid growing up in the Memphis suburbs in the 1950s. It features some of his most expressive singing from his time as a solo artist. This set includes previously un-released recordings and others that are quite rare. All have been out of print for some time. This is a great lazy Sunday afternoon record to listen to and curl up with someone you love.


        R. Stevie Moore And Jason Falkner

        Make It Be

        R. Stevie Moore and Jason Falkner are both brilliant solo artists but, as Make It Be loudly announces, their voices, performances, and arrangements make for a match made in heaven that's been realised here on earth.

        What happens when R. Stevie Moore and Jason Falkner get together to record, arrange, and mix R. Stevie's songs? We get to hear an audacious realization of the tracks full potential in an epic collaboration no one saw coming.

        Moore and Falkner burst through your door with "I H8 Ppl" and take you on a journey through rock, pop, and experimental textures. Anchors such as "Play My Self Some Music" and "Sincero Amore," keep the effort focused, while guitar-only interludes and spoken word pieces push boundaries.

        Before they met up, both artists had long and storied careers, but their paths to cult status take completely opposite routes. Moore is widely considered to be the godfather of the DIY recording aesthetic. Dubbed a “lo-fi legend” by the New York Times, he started his career in the late 60’s, gaining widespread underground recognition during the 70’s punk explosion. Anticipating the viral internet era, Moore made innumerable cheap but brilliant videos. Luckily, many of them eventually found their way to YouTube where a whole new generation of fans discovered his work including the likes of MGMT, Mac DeMarco, The Vaccines and collaborator Ariel Pink.

        Falkner was involved in various major label deals as a group member and solo artist. He started with Paisley Underground pioneers The Three O Clock, joined supergroups Jellyfish with Andy Sturmer and Roger Manning, and the Grays with Jon Brion, finally scoring a solo deal with Elektra. He’s gone on to release numerous solo records and has worked with a wide range of artists, including Beck, Air, Brendan Benson and Paul McCartney.

        Recorded by Jason Falkner at his Rhetoric Studio in Hollywood with the majority of songs composed by Moore, with one by Falkner, one co-written by the pair, one co-written by Roger Ferguson. There's a wonderful rendition of Huey Smith & The Clowns "Don't You Just Know It."


        FORMAT INFORMATION

        Ltd LP Info: Vinyl comes with a digital download code including bonus tracks.

        Teen Men is the self-titled debut album from this Delaware-based four piece audio/visual group. The album was recorded at The Garden Center and Paper Lab Recording studios in Delaware and engineered, mixed and produced by band member Nick Krill.

        Teen Men comprises two musicians Nick Krill and Joe Hobson (members of The Spinto Band) and two visual artists Albert Birney (creator of the Simply Sylvio series on Vine) and artist Catharine Maloney (who has exhibited internationally and has a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University).

        The resultant music is an ambitious blending of tunefully trippy melodies delivered via guitars, synthesizers, and vocals, with impertinent samples and haunting, atmospheric ambient electronics. These performances are audio/visual experiments; innovative, individualistic and concise, reflecting a love of the pop thrill and a dedication to classic song craft.

        The members of Teen Men didn’t start working together with the conscious goal of “making a band." Long time friends, Nick, Joe and Albert decided to collaborate on a quick and spontaneous one-off project involving music and video. The idea was an attempt to reawaken and become inspired after completing especially intense projects in their respective fields (a Spinto Band recording for Nick and Joe and a feature film entitled The Beast Pageant for Albert). After viewing what they created they decided to make more and invited friends to come participate. Catharine started showing up at sessions and then was assimilated into the project. After a few months, the four realized they’d created a body of work and that’s when the project was christened "Teen Men”. The term, taken from an advertisement in a 1960s Playboy, is a state of mind, which anyone can imbibe in. To be a Teen Man involves taking risks, irrational self-confidence, and the search for new experiences.

        At the core of the Teen Men’s artistic identity is their unique style of creative interplay, the contrast between how the musicians responded to artistic inspirations and challenges as opposed to the visual artists and the ingenious ways they’d combine them. The results were often beyond what any of them would have imagined left to their own devices. Fundamental was their desire to translate visual elements into music, though the opposite process was constantly occurring as well.

        In concert Teen Men perform along to a homemade interactive video that is synchronized to the music. The video provides an interactive platform for the band members and audience.

        5/5 review in the Guardian: “Please take the five stars not as a statement that this is the best record of 2013, but as a delighted endorsement of a genre classic.

        *8/10 review in NME: “this Chicago-based singer-songwriter offers a bratty, ragged take on new york dolls, spector-era ramones and e street band carnival rock, revealing a gift for crafting freeway-cruisn' tunes served with an extra helping of roadkill.”

        *Guardian playlist: “feeling a Velvety itch in the wake of Lou Reed's death? Ezra Furman might just hit the spot...”


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