Underground Youth

Fill The Void

Image of Underground Youth - Fill The Void
Record Label
Fuzz Club

About this item

The Underground Youth have always been steeped in a romantic nostalgia, their poignant psychedelic post-punk sounding like what might happen if Rowland S. Howard, Leonard Cohen, Bauhaus and The Velvet Underground jammed in a room together, but on this new 45 the band have turned this nostalgia in on themselves. The lyrics are taken from Dyer’s old notebooks dating back nearly a decade and in its minimalistic yet impassioned instrumentation, it also feels like somewhat of a throwback to the older recordings that left them to pick up a cult following (their 2010 LP Mademoiselle 2010 picking up over six million views on Youtube.) 'Fill The Void' and 'Take Me Awry' offer a reflective journey through the band's impassioned psychedelic post-punk, with it's 80s-style percussion, funeral vocals croons and dark jangly instrumentation that occasionally breaks down into a whirlwind of fuzzed-out guitars.

This desire to strip things back to their raw fundamentals and reflect on the last decade of the project came after the two tracks were nearly shelved because they didn’t quite fit the new direction they’re set to travel down on their forthcoming album. “We’d been experimenting with a completely different sound whilst in the studio recording our ninth album. What we created with these two tracks wasn't really what I was looking for and so I almost scrapped them,” Craig continues: “I just couldn't shake the rhythm of 'Fill the Void' though, we ran through the track as a band and took it out on the road. It fast became one of the most exciting tracks of our set, with Olya's pounding drum and Leo jumping on the additional snare towards the end. When we got back from the tour we revisited the tracks in the studio and decided to use them for a special release.” As The Underground Youth set to delve into exciting new waters, on this special release they've taken us on a typically-gloomy trip down memory lane - not just in terms of post-punk and psychedelia's darker histories, but also for the band themselves.

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