soundtracks . library music . exotica . easy


Genre pick of the week Cover of Jodorowsky's Dune Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by Kurt Stenzel.

Kurt Stenzel

Jodorowsky's Dune Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

- First time release
- Liner notes by composer Kurt Stenzel
- Original artwork by Nick Stewart Hoyle
- 2xLP housed in a deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket
- Includes download card for full album

This is the soundtrack to the story about the greatest film that never was.

Jodorowsky’s Dune tells the tale of cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s unsuccessful attempt to adapt Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi novel, Dune, to the big screen. Composer Kurt Stenzel gives life to a retro-futuristic universe as fantastic as Jodorowsky’s own vision for his Dune–a film whose A-list cast would have included Salvador Dalí, Orson Welles, and Mick Jagger in starring roles and music by psychedelic prog-rockers Pink Floyd.

Building upon director Frank Pavich’s idea for a score with a “Tangerine Dream-type feel,” Stenzel lays out a cosmic arsenal of analog synthesizers that would make any collector green at the gills: among other gems are a rare Moog Source, CZ-101s, and a Roland Juno 6, as well as unorthodox instruments like a toy Concertmate organ and a Nintendo DS. “I also played guitar and did vocals,” says Stenzel, “some chanting… and some screaming, which comes naturally to me.” The score also features narration by Jodorowsky himself. As Stenzel notes, “Jodo’s voice is actually the soundtrack’s main musical instrument–listening to him was almost like hypnosis, like going to the guru every night.”

This highly-anticipated soundtrack LP was sequenced and mixed by Stenzel with the listener in mind and flows through a “four-sides” LP approach. “I wanted it to play like the records I grew up with, where every side was a journey.”

“My last record was a break up record and if I had to label this one I would call it a make up record. I’m making up with myself. making up for lost time. making up for everything I ever did and never did.”

So says Adele about her new long player '25'. "Highly anticipated" doesn't quite cut it, with the video for lead single 'Hello' clocking in at 404,293,556 views the last time I looked (and undoubtedly more by the time you read this). '25' might be the event record of 2015, but really it's a continuation of the sound that brought '21' 9 x platinum global sales. The intimate piano ballads, epic swelling choruses, R&B pop hints and BIG production are all present and correct on '25', along with the emotional catch in Adele's voice - the thing that lifts her head and shoulders above all the melisma-ing X-Factor wannabes. The album features co-production from Greg Kurstin, Tobias Jesso Jr ('When We Were Young'), Danger Mouse ('River Lea') and Swedish pop svengalis Max Martin & Shellback ('Send My Love (To Your New Lover)') 

Originally released in 1964, Zulu is among the most popular of John Barry’s early soundtracks, and the main theme is still frequently heard on radio, conjuring up images of the British army’s courageous defence of (and the Zulus’ equally fearless assault on) Rorke’s Drift during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, as depicted in Cy Endfield’s memorable film.

John Barry (1933-2011) was one of the best known composers of film music in the world. His early career found him working as in-house arranger for EMI, leader of hit instrumental combo the John Barry Seven, and composer, arranger and conductor on the first UK soundtrack album (the Adam Faith vehicle Beat Girl). After Barry’s involvement as arranger on the first James Bond film Dr No in 1962, he was appointed as primary composer for the film franchise. In 2002 he received the GoldenEye award, courtesy of the Ian Fleming Foundation.

The BAFTA-nominated Zulu (1964) was directed by Cy Endfield with a cast including Stanley Baker, Michael Caine and Jack Hawkins. Originally released in 1964 on the British indie label Ember, the LP comprises soundtrack music (with two of the tracks incorporating narration by Richard Burton), followed by “A Selection of Zulu Stamps”, which are essentially beat instrumentals flavoured with southern African influences, performed by the John Barry Seven.

Ember initially pressed the album in mono, switching to stereo for a 1972 reissue (same catalogue number), although a stereo pressing had previously surfaced in the USA. Long unavailable on vinyl, Zulu is now reissued by Fantastic Voyage as a 180g pressing, mastered from original stereo tapes. The vinyl is housed in the original Ember sleeve artwork, and bears the label design prevalent at the time of the stereo pressing.

'Under the shimmering diversions of the spectacle, banalization dominates modern society the world over and at every point where the developed consumption of commodities has seemingly multiplied the roles and objects to choose from. The remains of religion and of the family (the principal relic of the heritage of class power) and the moral repression they assure, merge whenever the enjoyment of this world is affirmed–this world being nothing other than repressive pseudo-enjoyment. The smug acceptance of what exists can also merge with purely spectacular rebellion; this reflects the simple fact that dissatisfaction itself became a commodity as soon as economic abundance could extend production to the processing of such raw materials.'

Steve Lyon's phenomenal Bitter Minnow project returns to Ono for another excursion into synthetic-organic sonic exploration. Lyon's guitar playing is spacious, ambient and experimental; often preferring singular harmonic resonances to full chords or scales. Comparisons could be drawn with Mark Mcguire as to the ethereal optimism contained within his frequencies and tones but Bitter Minnow sounds completely different to McGuire, instead floating on a Fuxa-esque wave of dreaminess. Absolutely sublime, from start to finish, and should keep you hovering above the heavens for some time after. Recommended. 


Ltd CD Info: Hand stamped, limited run CD complete with wrap-around Ono artwork sleeve. Exceptionally presented!

Rawhead & Bloodybones deftly spins together sampled Appalachian folk tales and field recordings with newly composed music. The album focuses on folk tales mostly told by children and recorded in the 1940s. The tales are humorous, gruesome, and full of meaning and character. They are weaved together with archival samples and newly composed instrumental parts. The combination of the youthful voices and often-grisly tales offer a striking contrast. 

Lee Hazlewood

Its Cause And Cure

    The mid-to-late '60s were strange days for Lee Hazlewood. Having struck gold as songwriter and vocal foil for Nancy Sinatra, he signed up to MGM as an artist in his own right, and between 1966 and 1968, produced three ambitious solo albums that were eclectic, idiosyncratic, and most of all, unpredictable.

    It was a happy time for Lee; his music was hot on the charts, he was fully immersed in his collaboration with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom.

    The second of his MGM trilogy - 1967's peculiarly named Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure - took on countrified French ye-ye (“The Girls In Paris”), a tale of a young bullfighter built on Spanish guitar and choral cowboys (“Jose”), a string-drenched song about the passing of time (“The Old Man And His Guitar”), and a western epic about a Native American tribe (“The Nights”). And that was just the first four tracks. Elsewhere, the honky tonk madness of “Suzi Jane Is Back In Town,” the Byrds-like jangle of “In Our Time” and–in the bonus tracks–an instrumental named “Batman” confirm this to be one of Hazlewood's most far-ranging, far-out LPs ever.

    It’s the result of two main factors: ambition–to top Phil Spector, primarily–and cash, which paid for orchestras, plush studios, and the inestimable talents of arranger Billy Strange. “I think the big sound of those records came out of the Spector thing,” says Hokom, in the new liner notes. “If you can have a big sound and you have money to burn… it was a flamboyancy.”

    Released before the Nancy & Lee LP–a bona fide hit for Reprise Records–Hazlewoodism was a tougher nut to crack, a record that confused by combining po-faced delivery with unabashed comical touches. By 1967, Hazlewood had founded the LHI imprint, and was busy building his own empire–one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, plus predecessor, The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and follow-up, Something Special. Welcome to Hazlewood's magnificent–and mad–MGM years.


    LP Info: LP housed in a deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket.

    Lee Hazlewood

    Something Special

      The three years spent on MGM Records between 1966 and 1968 were golden ones for Lee Hazlewood. He spent them working with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom, writing a still-unreleased book, The Quiet Revenge of Elmo Furback, competing with Phil Spector from their respective studios, and coming up with the formula for the "boy/girl” songs for which he'd become famous. In fact, the unflattering portrait on the cover of Something Special did little to hint at how hip this late-flowering talent (he was in his late 30s when “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’” made him a star songwriter) had become.

      The common strand on the MGM trilogy is one of the unexpected happening. They were an ill fit for a major label–experimental, difficult to pigeonhole, and unpredictable. Those descriptors apply nowhere more aptly than Something Special. Where 1966's The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and 1967's Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure had employed an arranger, Billy Strange, and a full orchestra, Something Special stripped things back and brought in a flavor of jazz and blues, complete with gravelly-voiced scatting courtesy of collaborator Don Randi. This sat alongside tracks like “Little War” and “Hands,” the kind of late night, acoustic balladeering Hazlewood would later seize for his career-highlight LP, Requiem For An Almost Lady. The sound was that of a stripped-down nightclub jazz/blues/folk combo, fully rejecting the psychedelic music going on all over the world.

      The album made clear that forging a career as a serious star was not at the top of Hazlewood's agenda, and at the third opportunity, he'd let the listener in on the joke. Tellingly, Hokom recalls Hazlewood saying the MGM albums were his “expensive demos. I’m sure that MGM thought that they would be successful.” Little chance of that with Something Special–it was originally released only in Germany. The same year, Hazlewood founded the LHI imprint, and began building his own empire, one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, three albums that generated some of Hazlewood's best–and most varied–work.


      LP Info: LP housed in a deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket.

      Lee Hazlewood

      The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood

        Lee Hazlewood was a late bloomer. Following a meandering career as a disc jockey, producer, songwriter, label executive and solo artist, Hazlewood hit the jackpot at the ripe age of 37 with “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” the song Nancy Sinatra took to the top of the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. Its success convinced MGM Records that Hazlewood was a bankable star, and they signed him as an artist in his own right the same year. But as a self-described "non-singer" whose cult 1963 debut, Trouble Is A Lonesome Town, was little more than a happy accident, they'd perhaps gotten the wrong end of the stick where Lee was concerned.

        In three years on the label, Hazlewood delivered three albums and sundry odds and ends, beginning with 1966 album The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood. The LP found Hazlewood gunning–in as much as he ever did–for commercial success, blending country, pop, novelty, mariachi, and lounge music into something unusually of-the-moment.

        Lushly orchestrated and–like the album that preceded it–half-sung, half-spoken in a way that Hazlewood made all his own, the album collected solo versions of songs made famous by Sinatra and others (“Sand,” “Boots,” “So Long Babe,” “Summer Wine”–included as a bonus duet with Suzi Jane Hokom) alongside some of his career-best solo compositions, among them the Morricone-like opener, “For One Moment.” It’s a record of extremes: “When A Fool Loves A Fool” is as light and throwaway as anything he ever laid down, while the wistful “My Autumn's Done Come” (sample lyric: "Let those I-don't-care days come in, I'm tired of holding my stomach in") is as raw and honest.

        Despite MGM's best efforts, Hazlewood proved difficult to market without a Sinatra to temper his baritone drawl, and you'd suspect Hazlewood wasn't taking it quite as seriously as they might have hoped anyway. By 1967, Hazlewood had founded the LHI imprint and was busy building his own empire–one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, plus follow-ups Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause and Cure (1967) and Something Special (1968). Welcome, then, to Hazlewood's magnificent MGM years.


        LP Info: LP housed in a deluxe gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket.

        Neil Hefti

        Batman Theme / The Batusi

          Theme song from the original 1960s television show. Pressed on opaque yellow vinyl. Graphics will be"cartoony" in nature lending to the original theme of the show.

          Mark Kozelek And Nicolas Pauls

          Dreams Of Childhood: A Spoken Word Album

          Dreams Of Childhood is a collection of 12 poems written by street kids in Argentina, translated Argentine actor/musician Nicolás Pauls, Federico Novik, Pablo Cubarle and Catalina Morano.

          Performed in English by Mark Kozelek and in Spanish by Nicolás Pauls. Executive producer Nicolás Pauls. All proceeds will go to La Casa de la Cultura de la Calle (The Streets House of Culture) which is a nonprofit civil organization that seeks the social inclusion of kids with no homes by giving them art, music, theatre and photography classes.

          David Lynch & Marek Zebrowski

          Polish Night Music - Vinyl Edition

          Barren train stations, Polish factories at night, and silent hotels where lonely travelers meet. These are the images and suggested narratives that pervade the spirit of Polish Night Music, the musical collaboration between American filmmaker David Lynch (Twin Peaks, Eraserhead) and Polish concert pianist and composer Marek Zebrowski.

          Zebrowski and Lynch first met during the Camerimage Film Festival in Lodz, Poland, and started to work together during the organic evolution of Lynch’s Inland Empire. Originally, Zebrowski served as a translator for the shooting of several Lodz-based Polish scenes in Empire, but upon discovering their shared interest in musical experimentation and improvisation, Lynch invited Zebrowski to his Los Angeles studio to participate in a series of musical experiments. From these initial collaborations, inspired by their unique and distinct connections to Poland, emerged a tangible mood and distinctly modern texture that became Polish Night Music.

          “(Poland) is a landscape that continues to remain at once familiar and completely alien to me,” Zebrowski explains. “Every time I am there, I am surprised by some- thing, and I think for David, Poland certainly represents the process of discovery.”

          “We don’t know what will happen,” says Lynch, simply. Somewhere in this not- knowing exists the experience of a Polish night, and this album is its soundtrack.

          Nouvelle Vague

          Nouvelle Vague - Vinyl Edition

          French musicians Marc Collin and Olivier Libaux are the duo behind the cleverly named Nouvelle Vague, which translates as new wave in English and bossa nova in Portuguese. The name gets to the very essence of the idea behind these songs - post punk new wave tracks re-played in a mellow bossa nova / easy latin style, fronted by a parade of guest female vocalists (six French, one Brazilian and one New Yorker). Joy Division, PIL, The Clash, The Specials, Depeche Mode, The Undertones, XTC, Sisters Of Mercy, Tuxedomoon, The Cure, The Dead Kennedys, Killing Joke and Modern English are all given the Nouvelle Vague homage, showing the brilliance of the original compositions, while breathing new life into them. Whether you grew up with these songs in the late 70s / early 80s, or are coming to them afresh, you have to agree that this LP is a bit special.

          Various Artists

          Transformers The Movie OST - 30th Anniversary Collector's Edition

            Marking the 30th Anniversary of the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack to Transformers The Movie comes this collector's edition, double vinyl package including two etched, coloured vinyl LPs in a Transforming gatefold sleeve. LP1 is pressed on red vinyl and etched with the Autobot logo, while LP2 is pressed on purple vinyl and etched with the Decepticon logo. The gatefold sleeve completely "transforms" all four sides from an Autobot themed jacket to a Decepticon themed jacket. This original 1986 cult classic, remastered and re-imagined, has never sounded or looked better! Transformers, There's More Than Meets The Eye!

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